Studebaker Engines and Ethanol Blended Gas

Hi Guys, Boy, I'm just loaded with questions today! Here in New Jersey gas stations are now required to sell gasoline that is blended with
anywhere between 10% - 15% ethanol. I've noticed that the 289 engine in my 63 GT Hawk has been idling a bit rougher with this new gas formulation, not horribly but noticably to me. Anyone else out there noticing any performance or operational changes with ethanol mixed gas? I'm using 93 octane high test high quality gas all the time. I'm wondering if the fuel volatility level may have changed or if it may be advisable to tweak the timing. Right now it is precisely on the timing mark when idling at 550 RPM. -George-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
reichsrundfunk wrote:

You will probably need to change the mixture to get it to run right. this is probably true of any car with a carburetor.
nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in the real world i am a petroleum distributor for a number of large refineries. as part of the govt mandated change from mtbe to ethanol additized gasolines our industry has been faced with a lot of conversion problems related to the changeover. as an example all of our underground storage tanks had to be thourougly cleaned which in some cases meant we had to put men down in the tanks to make absolutely certain the tank bottoms were both dry [water is typically found in the bottoms of gasoline tanks as a result of natural condensation] and clear of any soluble debris that oftentimes finds it way into storage tanks. the primary problem being water as since gas will not absorb water product will float on top of any water in the tanks. this is not usually a problem since the submerged turbine pumps that lift the product from the tanks bottoms are cut off at anywhere from 6 to 12 inches from the bottom of the tank. with the introduction of ethanol that all changed because ethanol will absorb water which of course in any quantity will raise havoc with any internal combustion engine. as a result not only do the tanks have to be cleaned of water but they must also be continually monitored so that when water appears [as it will inevitablely] a stop sale on the product will be instituted. additionally the indusrty has developed a filter which should be installed on the fuel dispensers [gas pumps] which will shut off the flow as soon as any contaminated product is detected. the other probably more significant issue is that all gasoline leaves a varnish type residue which is found in virtually every system the product touchs. ethanol is a solvent for varnish so the ethanol additized product is actually stripping the accumulated varnish from the underground storage tanks, piping, gas pumps, car fuel tanks, fuel lines, carbs, injectors, manifolds etc. with all the above as background what we are probably experiencing is some water dilution of the ethanol along with the varnish scrubbing effect which is resulting in rough idling etc. my guess is that the more ethanol additized product you burn the cleaner your fuel system will become and the quicker your performance issues will resolve. my advice is to be patient and wait for the new fuels to do their job BEFORE you start fooling around with fuel mixtures etc. hope the above helps. ed ellis
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Works for me Ed. Right now I'm compensating as much as I can be throwing in 1/2 can of 104+ octane booster and fuel system cleaner (as well as lead substitute in the same quantity). I've really noticed a huge difference in engine performance frm gas brand and station to brand. Generally I stick to Exxon or Shell, but once in awhile I might use Valero or something else in a pinch.
My trusted mechanic is also an Exxon retailer and not long ago he had asked me to pass around the question of whether the new fuels were having any effect on other classic cars I kn ow of. He had recently returned from a class on the new fuels at Exxon and they wer talking quite a bit about the natural cleaning properties of ethanol and their possible effects in various aspects of fuel and automotive applications. They mentioned older carbureted cars and classics, etc but said they had no raw data and to try to find out what the retailers could find. I've been spreading the conversation around my Studebaker friends as wll as my Packard friends and no one has really come back with anything difinitive, either with OHV or flathead configurations.
Now, my 63 GT Hawk of course has an overhead valve design. however my two Packards both have flathead eights, and neither of those have exhibited any effects of the changeover whatsoever. The 1940 252 CID 8 has a 6.75 to 1 compression ratio and the 1950 288 CID eight has a 7.5 to 1 ratio. Otherwise, they are the same design and virtually the same displacement.
By the way, the sign looks great on the side of the house (much to the chagrin of my neighbors at night....) Gotta send pix! Hee hee hee hee :-) -George-
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have noticed the HFH having mini heart attacks upon acceleration, and at idle it farts. This started since our trip out to the Shrock Brothers. Since I cannot get the fuel guage to work properly, we top off every 120 to 140 miles. All our fuel stops were in Pa. and NJ.
BG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What I tell my customers is to add a fuel filter between fuel tank and fuel pump and a second filter between fuel pump and carburetor. Use a see-thru type disposable filter and have both filters the same. As the filter darkens from fuel system being cleaned you replace the primary fuel filter (tank to pump) with the secondary fuel filter (pump to carb) and put new filter in secondary position (i.e. fleet maint. procedures) this way you are only buying a new secondary filter. Also keep eye on fuel pump gaskets, carb gaskets and any fuel system rubber components (fuel line to accel pumps) for deteriation. I only use fuel injection quality hoses anymore. We need to adapt and I personally feel better using the new fuel blends vs. the older blends with "patchfuk" chemicals.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.