Diesels available in the USA

Mortimer wrote:


Well, yes and no. Purchased at the filling station, it is. But some of us have alternative sources*. this is not easily done with petrol, unless you distill your own ethanol and buy an E85 vehicle. But then the BATF will be watching you. Rumor has it that one reason the feds were so interested in cracking down on moonshiners during the Prohibition was that they didn't want farmers running their product in their vehicles, bypassing the taxable sales outlets for petrol.
*With respect to 'alternative sources', then next time you people come up with an idea like running your cars on used cooking oil, please keep your yaps shut! Now the recyclers buy it all up and tack road tax plus a 'green fuel' premium on it.
--
Paul Hovnanian snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mortimer wrote:

Uh, diesel is twice the price of gas in the U.S. Also the diesels sold here during the past turned a LOT of people away from them. They were VERY noisy, low powered and STANK to high heaven. The modern engines are much better but nobody want to try the experiment and see IF they would sell. For a while there were a lot of diesels available, GM had the LUV,the S-10, Chevette, the Cutlass and a few others. Ford had a similar line up as well. Chrysler was about the only one that didn't have a bunch, but that was also the era of the Kcar rebound and they had enough problems at the time.
Currently there are a few imports available but they don't sell well except to folks who came from Europe OR ones who just want to stand out.
You also have to remember that drive distances and times are usually much higher in the US, and the small engines sold in Europe just won't take that kind of use for long periods.
--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Autobahn has its share of diesels, and they run at high speeds for long distances. I am not sure I can agree with you on this.
The purposefully constructed diesels hold up rather well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I regularly do 250 miles each way non-stop on motorway / dual-carriageway all the way - so at 70-80 mph. At the end of the journey, it's me that's tired, not the car!
The car's done 138,000 miles since new, and the only things that have failed have been the sort of things that could fail on any car: fan belt (twice in succession - garage didn't spot a wobbly pulley the first time), clutch (after about 70,000 miles) and routine service items like brake discs/pads, tyres and shock absorbers / dampers.
It's still returning the same fuel consumption that it did when it was new (well, excluding the first few thousand miles till the engine was properly loosened up) and it still feels to have as much acceleration and hill-climbing ability.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are in Europe, I might add that maintenance items are required under the EU inspection that are not even considered in the USA.
A lot of the cars on the road in the USA today would not be allowed on the road if they had to pass European rules.
Therefore, service items might appear to be more severe than they actually are, on an equal basis.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message news:BLudne3wU73O-

At one time garages used to fail a car on its MOT (annual inspection) if it had a blown light bulb in the indicator or brake light, then make you pay a retest fee. There seems to have been a change in the rules because now they will simply replace the bulb and record that as a pass. Even for major work they will do it (after getting your permission) and record that as a pass. From memory, the things that are covered in the MOT are: brakes (visual inspection of pads and discs; rolling road test for equal braking force left/right; handbrake applies at least a certain force when it's on), tyres (tread and sidewall), suspension (check for leaking dampers, check for bouncing), windscreen wipers and washer (do they clean the screen without leaving smears), structural load-bearing bodywork (or chassis, for cars that have one), exhaust emissions (CO2, CO, NOx, particulates for diesel etc), indicator/break/side/tail, alignment of headlights (check that they don't point too low or high when dipped and that they dip to the left (kerb) side), number plate (font, size - see next paragraph). Until the emissions test was introduced, it was not actually mandatory that a car being tested had a working engine - or even an engine at all ;-) What do US inspections test, and do the requirements vary from state to state or are the same across the country?
There are several construction and use regulations in the UK which are different: indicators must flash orange and must be separate to any other light, unlike in the US where combined indicator/side or indicator/brake lights are permitted; cars must have a front number plate as well as a rear one and both must be a prescribed size of plate, size of text and typeface. On the other hand, headlights may be rectangular as an alternative to round and they may swivel with the steering to "look" into a bend - I believe several European cars had to have their headlights modified from rectangular to round for export to the US and the Citroen DS had to have its steered headlights locked to the straight-ahead position. Maybe those restrictions have been relaxed in the US as well now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mortimer wrote:

US testing does indeed vary widely from state to state, and even areas within a state. As an example of the later, TX has an annual safety inspection which does cover lights, brakes, etc. similar to what you noted, but whether there is an emissions inspection depends on the county, and in my county there are no emissions inspections.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In America, if there were full size six passenger cars, 500 horsepower, 600 miles per gallon cars, the commie fed govt would be taxing everybody $100.00 per mile. cuhulin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete C. wrote:

The biggest example I can think of is Texas vs. California. Texas has safety inspections (lights, wipers, brakes, fluid leakage, they're SUPPOSED to check for structural rust or damage, etc. Plus the designated EPA "non-attainment" areas (Austin, Houston, El Paso, D/FW, maybe San Antonio) have emissions tests.
California: No safety test. If it passes an emissions test but has enough rust to see the pavement between your feet, no worries.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What do US inspections

As was mentioned by another poster, in Texas they check the lights and function of the brakes. Bald tires will fail you, wipers should work, etc. Minor stuff. Emissions tested in some counties.
An EU test takes a look at all those things and others, such as dripping motor oil, broken ball joint rubbers, broken CV joint rubbers, rust, and other things. You have to have them fixed or walk. I have mostly heard the term MOT used in the UK, and am not sure if this is now the same as the EU inspection or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Whenever my van is ue for a new safety sticker, I drive over to Pete Robertson's auto repair shop.He scrapes off the old sticker and then puts a new sticker on there and I pay $5.00 and that is that. cuhulin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I don't know whether there's an EU-wide standard for vehicle inspection tests and whether the UK's is more or less stringent than those in other EU countries.
There used to be a big black market trade in forged MOT certificates to make it look as if dangerous cars were still roadworthy. However the bottom dropped out of that when a computerised system was introduced, because the entry in the database became the definitive record, rather than it being the piece of paper. If the police suspect any fraud, they check back in the database - which is much harder to forge than a piece of paper. It also means that when applying for an annual road tax disc, for which proof of insurance and MOT is needed, it can be done online rather than requiring the local post office who issues the tax disc to check the insurance and MOT forms - apply online, giving your credit card, the system checks your registration in the insurance and MOT databases and the new tax disc arrives by post a few days later - nice and easy.
I think most MOT failures are not regarded as a reason for immediately grounding a car. Obviously there will be some things which will be reason for condemning a car immediately, but in many cases you are allowed to carry on driving until the current MOT runs out - and you can get your car tested up to (I think) a month before the expiry of the certificate, which gives you leeway to get the faults fixed when it's convenient. But if you take the car away rather than getting the testing garage to fix it, you pay for it to be re-tested.
I'm surprised that some counties and/or states in the US don't do emissions tests, because I'd always thought that emissions tests and standards were pioneered there. Certainly US cars required catalytic converters on all new cars a long long time before they became mandatory here in the UK.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mortimer wrote:

I'd guess that emissions tests in the U.S. are the exception rather than the rule. Same for so-called safety inspections. In Arizona only two counties require emissions tests and there is no safety inspection. Except for the DOT (and perhaps EPA) standards for vehicles, there is no country-wide standard or testing for much of anything regarding cars & trucks...it's mostly up to the states. Ditto for most other things as well (education, voting rules, etc.).
On the original topic of this thread...I believe Honda is planning to offer a Diesel engine in 2010, in the Accord, I think.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I doubt too that there would be an EU-wide standard for that. Here in Finland people consider our tests most stringent in the EU. I believe it's among the most stringent ones but still probably not the most stringent. Of course, people whose cars have got failed in an annual inspection keep grumbling how in _any_ other EU member state their car would've passed with no problems...
However, I know there _are_ differences in accepting imported (outside of Europe) vehicles first time to be registered for road use. In Finland it seems to be often outright impossible to get accepted a car or truck imported e.g. from US. I don't have first-hand experience about this but I believe the problem is that the inspection offices here would require some certificates that only exist for vehicles that have been sold in Europe originally by manufacturer.
The solution? People simply have their imported vehicles first registered in e.g. Sweden. And once a vehicle has been found to be road legal in one member state, every member state will have to accept it in the condition in which it was accepted in the first one. It seems that in several other member states procedures exist to find out if a car or its component despite lacking certificates still meets the requirements, but in Finland officials are afraid to make their own decisions as one day some of them might turn out to be bad ones.
P.V.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"P.V." wrote:

Honestly, these "safety" inspections are mostly just another tax, since for private vehicles, probably less than 1% of accidents result from mechanical failure.
Heavy trucks are a bit different in that the professional drivers are usually better, and the trucks log a lot more miles than a passenger car. Even there, mechanical failures probably account for a single digit percentage of accidents, with driver exhaustion and accidents caused by passenger cars doing stupid things accounting for most accidents.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This afternoon, I think that married Irish woman wayyyyyy over yonder across the big pond in Bognor Regis,England got unpizzed off enough at me, because she emailed me twice.I asked her if she is still driving that Fiat Punto car and does it have a diesel engine?
Later,,,,, no telling when she might decide to tell me. cuhulin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What really happened to Rudolph Diesel? Inventor of the Diesel Engine. I once read many years ago, he disapperead from a Ship from New York to Europe. cuhulin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

easy: http://www.cleangrease.com/index_files/Page322.htm
--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/2008 5:04 PM Mortimer ignored two million years of human evolution to write:

The requirements vary *wildly* from state to state.
Some states have no inspections at all, except for emissions testing in built-up urbanized areas. Washington state has no overall vehicle inspection requirements; emissions inspections are done only every two years in urbanized areas, Seattle and surrounding regions being the most obvious. Cars older than a certain age are exempt from emissions testing. Yes, you read that correctly: if your car is an old polluter built in 1965, but still running all right, there are no inspection or emissions requirements of any kind.
Oregon state is similar.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message >> If you are in Europe, I might add that maintenance items are required

Things are are not a pass on EU inspection will not necessarily get you off the road immediately, but you will have to have them fixed within a period of time. If you do not, cannot, past the inspection, the car can be taken off the road.
Rust is one issue that is seldom considered in the USA. Lack of integrity used to be considered on the MOT(such as rusted sills, rust around struts, etc) and I suppose still is.
Oil drips are considered, including grease seals at hubs, ball joints, CV joints, tranny, etc. These, if they catch the eye of the inspector, have to be fixed. And it goes on and on.
Cuhulin just gave you a clue as to what is really done here. They often scrape off the old sticker and put on a new one..Typically American way of doing things, I am afraid.
We Americans stirred up the shit about pollution, about alkylphenolethoxylates, and a number of other issues ,but we typically do not taste of our own medicine. As in the news stories lately, there is a new scandal almost every day, and our view of our moral highground is less and less credible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.