Impala steering wheel falling apart?



Mine has been perfect. But only time will tell.
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Eh, I wouldn't go so far as to call it a "lemon." The two real failures of the car were the stock tires, which were dangerously tractionless, and the parking brake which goes out of adjustment every couple months. Other than that, it's been eminently reliable - which is obnoxious, because I just wish it would fail in some spectacular manner so I could insist that it's time for a new car :(
It's one of those cars that's so reliable but you wish it wasn't - kind of an anti-Ferrari, if you will.
nate
======================================================== Gotcha. Been there, done that.
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Almost entirely off topic, I left the office last night and almost immediately caught up to a really pretty black Ferrari 275. Sadly, the driver not only had the top up and was driving like my grandmother but he was also talking on a cell phone. It is sad (at least to me) that driving a vintage Ferrari is so commonplace to some people that they don't mind multitasking while doing so... I must be doing something wrong with my life.
nate
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Maybe it's because they aren't drivers, but rather have the cars as status symbols? Or maybe it's because in this society police officers can use selective enforcement to act out their desires to punish people who've done better than they have?
I've never seen a exotic driven properly. Have seen an MFFY you in a Bently on the dan-ryan expressway. And then there was that guy in the Aston Martin who had to race the torqueless wonder car. (although he's offset by the another Aston Martin driver I out accelerated with my bicycle and in another sighting out turned with my '73)
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Jesus Brent, Did the wife say your dick was a little short this morning or what?
wrote:

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The frack? Whatever you read into that is your problem, not mine, mr. top poster. I just stated the fact of my experiences.

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wrote:

I've seen a Miura get all crossed up and smoky on a public street before. (that might not fit some people's definitions of "properly" but it certainly was likely "as intended by the manufacturer.") Of course I suspect that it was a mechanic giving it a post-tuneup test drive, as it was leaving the service bay of an exotic car dealership/ service center. I guess I just kind of expected that the kind of person that buys a NEW exotic might fit that mold, but someone who obviously went to the effort to purchase a rare, vintage example instead must actually be an enthusiast.
I'd personally be a little nervous about giving a thorough workout to a proper "crumpet catcher" on public roads because of a) the value of the thing approximating the purchase price of my house and b) the cop attracting factor, but one would assume that if you can afford to have one of your own that a) is not so much of a concern.
nate
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Best I've ever seen was when I was riding in a viper... although I don't put the viper in the same class. I did get to drive that car briefly.

I would too ;)

I've seen too many fine old cars abused (as in not being cared for) to think that would be the case.

I can see being careful with it, but driving like a old woman on the way to church is just not necesscary to keep it nice. Driving it like that probably makes it more likely to end up having someone plow into it.
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What is there, in your background, that would lead us to believe that 'you' know how a Ferrari should be driven. Do you frequently watch Magnum reruns, or something?
dave
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Years of posting to rec.autos.driving? I don't go there anymore, but seeing Brent here in a tech group makes me think it's dead, so he brings this OT crap here.
--Vic
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The frack? I didn't bring anything here. Try to follow the thread.
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I'll phrase it differently for you, I usually see exotics driven in a granny like manner that isn't even correct for stock taurus. For example, 55mph in the leftmost lane of an interstate in a 75mph traffic flow.
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Sounds like the only Diablo I've ever seen on the street (while yours truly was in a stock Taurus, as it happens). He had a good reason, though: a motorcycle cop holding formation off his left rear corner like a remora on a shark (soon joined by another one who swooped in after merging from another freeway).
The Lamborghini driver kept steady on, 55 (the speed limit on that stretch) right on the nickel; and didn't do what I was afraid he would, which was see just one cop, merge right, and smack the other into oblivion. After several miles of laboriously not giving them the sorely desired excuse, they went their separate ways.
--Joe
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N8N wrote:

I agree that all modern cars have HORRIBLE ergonomics in this regard. I'm absolutely certain that its because of airbags- they want to keep the wheel as far from the driver as possible so the airbag is less likely to take the driver's head off. But the result is a horrific straight-armed driving position that is both uncomfortable and greatly reduces control authority. When I get rental cars, I typically compromise between having my feet too close to the pedals (knees bent) in order to get the wheel in a halfway decent position. On cars with adjustable pedals, I lower the pedals as far as possible and that helps a bit.
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viestiss:OPWdnbwwnuFHIC_VnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@texas.net...

That's one theory. Another would be that manufacturers want also fast-food lovers to fit behind the wheel without having to squeeze there :)

I'm surprised you didn't mention telescoping steering wheel. According to my experience, it's much more common -- at least here in Europe -- than adjusting pedals. Did you take it for granted that steering wheel already was pulled as close to the driver as possible before finding the wheel still being too far, or don't cars where you live have that feature?
I think it would be good if adjusting pedals would become more common too, as they would help more people of different sizes to find comfortable driving position. I once saw on TV how a woman shorter than average, but not unusually short, was looking for car suitable for her. Here typically in a family with two cars, man drives the larger car and woman the smaller, but in the show it was found that small cars have limited adjustability and suit better for average-size drivers. In typical "women's cars" the woman in question had to move the seat all the way forward to reach the pedals, but then the steering wheel was so close to her chest (something like 10 cm) that she was worried about what would happen if in an accident the airbag would deploy... Ironically the best-fitting car for her tuurned out to be a large station wagon or space wagon that had adjusting pedals so she didn't have to move the seat so far forward!
P.V.
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Some do, some don't. The '05 Impala does not have that, or at least it's not standard equipment on the 'el strippo fleet beater' model.

I think it must be the airbag thing. I was driving a new-ish Malibu the other day which had a telescoping steering wheel and I still pulled it all the way towards me. Oddly enough I find that I fit fine in all the small cars I've owned, many VW's and a Porsche 944. I even fit in a 914 comfortably, but without a whole lot of room to spare - the same is true for a Miata. Of course none of the cars I've actually owned have had airbags.
There must be a preference, or at least lack of complaints, among consumers for a straight-armed driving position, because recent vehicles seem to universally encourage it. Back in the day this was not the case however, if nothing else you needed the leverage of having the wheel close to you if you didn't pop for the power steering option. Again this is a situation where I find my "antique" cars actually ergonomically better than modern ones (but then again, having the wiper/washer controls on the column, mirroring the turn signal stalk, is a wonderful innovation... of course GM, Ford, et. al. are still yet to adopt this eminently sensible arrangement and instead provide you with a 'multi-function stalk' with all the tactile feedback of a bowl of warm pudding, and which feels like it's going to snap off if you aren't ever so delicate in operating it...)
I guess right about now is where I show myself to be a true retro- grouch and mention that if I adjust the seat so I can fully depress the clutch in my '55 Stude, I can drape my right wrist over the top of the steering wheel, hang my left arm out the window, and tool down the highway in perfect comfort once I get the vent window adjusted just so... of course, that is not a car for the large of girth; that 17" steering wheel is awful close to the thighs even of Yours Truly. (let's conveniently ignore the fact that it's a straight line from the center of the horn button all the way down to the worm gear in the steering box, and that the two are connected by a solid steel tube. crashing would likely result in a driver-kebab.) I do have the optional power steering but to the horror of many aficionados I am actually considering doing away with it, just for simplicity's sake. Oh, and the horn ring just looks cool, too.
nate
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P.V. wrote:

VERY few rental cars have telescoping steering wheels, and my guess-sumption is that very few models sold in North America have them anymore. They were ubiquitous back in the 70s, and I loved them. I would suspect that north-American standard airbags (still rather much too powerful) probably preclude telescoping steering wheels in most cars. Of the many rentals I've had in my travels in recent years, only a couple of GM models have had telescoping wheels, and even then they have pitifully limited travel so that they remain too far away for my liking.

Strange as it may seem, they're not UNcommon here. Ford in particular seems to put them on many of their large vehicles (both full-size cars and truck/SUVs) at moderate option levels and not just "fully loaded" cars. Hence the fact that you frequently get Ford rentals with adjustable pedals.
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viestiss:Lc2dncUpxJF2vSnVnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@texas.net...

OK, it starts to look like it's different in North America and Europe. According to my observations, in Europe telescoping steering wheels started to appear in 90's and since have become matter of course in larger cars (here Chrysler Sebring and similar are large cars). Later, some time in 2000's, they started to appear in Corollas and similar (which are considered mid-size cars).

There's again difference: only vehicles I've seen here having adjusting pedals have been large vehicles ...that probably were primarily targeted at North American market. Maybe this telescoping steering wheel vs. adjusting pedals matter is because of different likings, or maybe simply because there wouldn't be extra legroom in average European car to be sacrificed for pedal-moving mechanism. Or maybe the reason is something else, I don't know...
By the way, the reason for smaller cars is mostly price: In Germany where car taxation is lighter, cars are almost as large as in US (based mostly on what I've seen on TV on German and American programs :) ). Instead some other European countries like Finland, Denmark and Norway have heavier taxation, so people can only afford smaller cars :(
Some examples on what kind of prices and configurations we have here in Finland: - Toyota Corolla with 1.6-liter engine (largest available) and average option level: 22 500 euros (32 500 USD) (one of the most common cars here) - Ford Focus 5-door hatchback 1.6: 21000 (30 500 USD) (also this is common) - Chrysler Sebring 2.0 Touring: 23 000 (33 500 USD) (most sold version) - Chrysler Sebring 2.7 Limited automatic: 37 000 (53 500) (most expensive version) - Chrysler 300C 5.7 HEMI AWD Touring: 78 000 (113 000) (not very common) - Lexus GS 460: 98 500 (143 000) (not very common either...) - Toyota Yaris 1.3 3-door: 15 000 (22 000) - Volvo C30 1.6: 27 000 (39 000)
The following probably aren't so familiar for people in North America :) - Lada 119 (aka Lada Kalina) 1.6, 5 doors: 12 000 (17 500) - Opel Astra 1.8: 23 500 (34 000) - Peugeot 407 2.0: 27 500 (40 000) - Renault Mgane 1.6 5-door: 21 000 (30 000) - Skoda Octavia 1.8: 26 000 (37 500)
P.V.
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wrote:

Well, you did call it a POS. I looked for similar problems because the car is on my short list for when I replace my '97 Lumina. Since the problem - so far - seems unique to your car I was suggesting possible reasons. It's my impression you're up east and not in Florida, where I might expect anything from sun damage. Many use windshield screens where the sun burns reals hot. Anyway, I agree about the ergs, and notice the same thing on my Lumina. It's a stretch to drape my wrist over the wheel in the up position, and the down position makes it difficult to enter/exit. I usually leave it up and end up resting my hands on the lower rim. Maybe not the preferred method, but at least I don't use a spinner. The design might have something to do with airbag deployment. BTW, I seldom grip the wheel firmly. Only in tight/fast situations, which I seldom encounter, or hanging on to it when I'm adjusting the seat. I prefer cars that track well, so except when making turns the wheel is basically a handrest. Never wore out a steering wheel. Since it's a company car, as others have said, let them fix it.
--Vic
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It sucks, Nate, but not unusual, all things taken into consideration.

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