HELP! Problems with my 2007 Camry SE V6

wrote:


Very true. I have a buddy that used to work for the dealers, the way the industry works is everyone on the front line has his pay scale alter by commission. Not just the sales but also sales manager, finance manager (for giving out the highest interest rates), and service agents and manager (for getting the most services done, even useless ones.) My buddy racks in $40,000 a month at a Lexus dealer, that bastard.
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It may be as simple as a frozen (rusted) brake pad causing VSC hiccups. Or you need to disconnect the battery and "reset" the ECU. But have the check-engine code read by a local auto parts store for free. Call around for one with OBD-II/CAN reader.
The owners of the following thread of the 2007 Camry complained about noises on the first drive in the morning. Some speculated it as VSC, others as ABS. One mentioned the famous "transmission flare" problem. BTW, there is no mechanical fix for this failure. You'll just get one new transmission free from Toyota (one owner suggested that the dealer was *instructed to ignore* the problem if it returns and then you're on your own) and hope that statistics is on your side.
http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f0c6927/10

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Doctor Chen wrote:

When the ignition switch is turned on, check that the ABS warning light, VSC warning light, BRAKE warning light and SLIP indicator light come on for approximately 3 seconds.
If the skid control computer stores any trouble codes, the ABS warning light, VSC warning light and SLIP indicator light come on.
You most likely have a fault in the skid control computer (P1578). The brake actuator is made on it as a unit and is mounted under the hood.
Are you sure that you are not hearing the VSC warning buzzer?
If there is a fault in this system, it should disable the cruise control, check it to see.
Are you certain that when you jumped it, the connections were correct and not accidentally touched or connected to the battery in reverse?
You can try disconnecting the battery to try and clear trouble codes but since this is on the brake system, it's a real safety issue and you really need to take this to someone knowledgeable, preferably the Toyota dealer you purchased it from, for professional diagnosis and repair.
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Did ANYONE have access to the keys when you were gone?

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I'm not really sure what you mean by "car slippery" lights, but it could be an indication that the VSC system is sensing that the car is in a skid and the VSC computer is trying to correct the skid but can't so it illuminated the VSC warning light. The grumbling sounds are probably a result of debris or rust buildup on the rotors from having been parked in a humid environment for a while, or it could be the VSC applying the brakes in an attempt to control the skid that it is incorrectly sensing.. If this is the case, a few applications of the brakes should make the sounds go away. Check to make sure there is no debris caught behind the wheels and make sure the tires are properly inflated.
I would go to a place like Autozone and borrow an OBD II code scanner an pull trouble codes. It is possible that there is a problem with one of the wheel speed sensors, but you usually also get and ABS trouble light as well.
Let us know what codes, if any come up and if a few applications of the brakes solve the problem.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
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On Wed, 9 Jan 2008 00:14:15 -0600, "Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote:>

Ok, after driven around (street and highway) I notice the brake sound is minimal (the rust is gone, so that's good), but the grumbling caused by the VSC is still there when I brake. I think somone is right when they say the car incorrectly senses the car going slippery and tries to fix it.
Also, one more clue, I notice I'm not getting any oil pressure on the oil meter even though I'm driving for a good 10 min. on the road including highway.
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If there really was no oil pressure, you'd would've killed your car by now. You really do need to stop driving this vehicle and get it to the dealer ASAP. If you already had an excellent independent mechanic, that would be an option, but in my opinion, this is not the time to go shopping for one.
There's no point in your asking any further questions, or trying to diagnose the problem yourself. You don't have to skill to fix anything.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
<...>

Or there could be damage that will cause the car to die in a few months.

I concur.

Well, if he needs a new engine, this will be quite a learning experience for him.
Jeff
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Check your dipstick, it may just be a faulty meter.
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EdV wrote:

Yet, even if the engine has the required amount of oil, the oil pump might not be working.
However, has the OP shown enough skill or knowledge to even check the dipstick?
Jeff
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Well, just my hunch, because I'm thinking a faulty oil pump because of sitting for a month? The way I see it an oil pump is mechanical and not electronic (am I right on this?) The gauge however is electronic and may have been affected by the dead battery.
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EdV wrote: <...>

<...>
That would be my guess, too. The electronic gauge shouldn't have been affected by the dead battery. It sounds like there might have been some sort electrical surge that fried some electronics. Also, the usual suspects come into play, like like loose wires or connectors.
Even if there is oil, I would want to make sure that there is oil pressure before driving it.
Jeff
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If you literally had NO oil pressure, my understanding is that you have minutes, if you're lucky. I had an oil pump die on my 92 Taurus, while going 65 mph. I got a warning light and a very odd sound, and killed the ignition instantly. Mechanic's comment: "You were really lucky your hand moved so fast."
It's interesting handling a car onto the shoulder with no power to the brakes or steering at those speeds, while also (by the way) towing a boat. :-)
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

In that situation, you're probably better off putting the engine in neutral (so you have better braking and steering) for ten seconds or so that it takes for you to slow down the car and boat. Better to have to rebuild an engine than buy a new car and boat and have recuperate in the trauma unit of the hospital.
Jeff
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When was the last time the oil was changed in the car and where was it changed? Check the engine oil level on the dipstick and check the transmission oil on the transmission dipstick and let us know what color you see on the dipsticks and what the fluid levels are. If the transmission fluid level does not show up on the transmission dipstick but the engine oil dipstick shows way over-filled, someone mistakenly drained the transmission fluid during an engine oil change and then over-filled the engine oil. The extreme engine oil overfill may cause the oil to foam, and then the foam would not circulate through the engine properly, showing low or no oil pressure. If you find this, DO NOT DRIVE THE CAR!!! Have it towed to a competent shop for proper diagnosis and repair.
In any event, if there is no oil pressure showing up on the oil pressure gauge, the car should be towed to a shop for diagnosis and repair. If the oil pressure gauge is functioning properly and engine oil pressure is in fact too low, severe engine damage will result, if it has not already happened.
Regarding the grumbling when you brake, the next step is to remove the wheels for an inspection of all four brakes. With the wheels off of the ground, check to see that none of the brakes calipers or shoes are frozen and that the rotors or drums are not rusted.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
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wrote:

Hello, thank you for the helpful tips by some and no thanks to some idiotic posts here.
But anyway, took it to the dealer and they said, and get this, there must be some small animals that got under my hood and "chew up a few wires"
Which in term broke a few sensors there and in term cause the car to go hay-wired on me (including the ones that controls oil pressure, which is why I'm not getting any readings although the engine's getting oil pumped through it.)
Also, they recommend I resurface the brakes because it's off and that causes my car to rumble, and then rebalance the wheels.
So there you have it folks. Small animals....
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Doctor Chen wrote:

If you are interested, this damage may be covered by your home owners insurance. You may want to check with your agent. Just a thought.
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This may sound insane, but it's possible. I recall a story from a half century ago, when an insurance underwriter came into his office looking angry. When asked about his mood, he said "this morning I was running to catch a streetcar and my hat blew off, and before I could catch it, another streetcar came along and cut it in half!" Another underwriter said "Put in a claim for it." "HUH?" "Sure. You've got a homeowners policy covering loss of household goods off the premises at 10% of the face amount. You lost your household goods off premises, and so, if your coverage is $10,000 for household goods, you've got $1000 for goods lost off premises." The guy put in a claim and got his hat replaced.
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Doctor Chen wrote:

Small animals are often a problem for wiring. I think they like the taste and texture of the plastic insulation (I am not joking - If I were joking I would ask if he knew any midgets around him who are mad at him, but I wouldn't make fun of midgets, so I wouldn't say that). Schools in NYC especially have problems like this. Unfortunately, they have a lot of small animals (and I don't mean pets) running around, like in the walls.
Sometimes, cars have problems when animals decide to make nests in the engine compartment. I have seen insect nests (I think wasp nests) in the opening for the door near the hinges. And a spider or two have taken up residence in the duct work. Fortunately, after a few days without water or food, they can't run away very fast.
Jeff
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