oil change opinions

Not a big deal but just wondering what others feel about this. I have to get an inspection on a corolla soon and wonder if I should change
the oil as well? It doesn't get driven more than 2000 miles/year and is very low miles also and in excellent shape (2004 model). If the oil looks pretty clean but perhaps a year old, is it advisable to still change the oil when I get it inspected or wait? Car when driven is on normal roads and in Texas.
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On Jan 3, 10:27 am, observer wrote:

Tom and Ray, the two brothers who own a garage in Boston and have a radio show and newspaper column have addressed this many times. Since they are supposedly professionals, I defer to their know-how.
For low mileage drivers, they recommend chaning the oil every six months or every 5K, whichever comes first. They throwout a number of reasons, one of which comes to mind is that oil sitting in the car never has a chance to burn off water collected, etc.
I suppose if your driving all consisted of very LONG trips with the car getting up to operating temperatures for a sustained period, you might be willing to dispute this. I would contend that $20, more or less, twice a year, is a cheap price to pay for peace of mind regarding a $14-17K investment.
I have a rig that also goes only about 7K a year, but being one of the infamous oil-gelling year TOYS, I still change the oil/filter in it every three months....
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On Jan 3, 1:42 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

A 2004 first inspection will be 5 years from the first registration right? That's on 2009. Anyway, if I were you I wouldn't be scared. Its still a new car and chances of getting an emission defect is quite low. If you want to be more confident, inspect your spark plugs and see if they are bad and allow your car to really warm up before going to inspection.
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On Jan 3, 10:27 am, observer wrote:

Tom and Ray, the two brothers who own a garage in Boston and have a radio show and newspaper column have addressed this many times. Since they are supposedly professionals, I defer to their know-how.
********** LOL! Those guys used to call our office for advice.
*********** For low mileage drivers, they recommend chaning the oil every six months or every 5K, whichever comes first. They throwout a number of reasons, one of which comes to mind is that oil sitting in the car never has a chance to burn off water collected, etc.
I suppose if your driving all consisted of very LONG trips with the car getting up to operating temperatures for a sustained period, you might be willing to dispute this. I would contend that $20, more or less, twice a year, is a cheap price to pay for peace of mind regarding a $14-17K investment.
I have a rig that also goes only about 7K a year, but being one of the infamous oil-gelling year TOYS, I still change the oil/filter in it every three months....
************* Excellent advice!
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
  Click to see the full signature.
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observer wrote:

That depends on how far it is driven each time. If you drive it once a week for 40 miles and get the engine good and warm, you don't need to change it. If, however, you do a lot short trips, then you need to change the oil.
Jeff
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<observer> wrote in message > Not a big deal but just wondering what others feel about this. I have

Are you desperately short of money, or are you being like my mother in law, who could be shot 6 times and wouldn't get in an ambulance unless she had a coupon to make the ride cheaper?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Does your mil know my sil? They both behave the same way.
I, too, prefer not to have unnecessary things done to my car. Using more resources (oil filter, oil) than needed is a waste of money and natural resources. After all, motor oil doesn't just come out of the ground. It requires refining and disposal. Plus, every time someone takes out the drain plug, there is a chance that the mechanic will mess it up, resulting in extra repairs or worse. The chance is small, but not zero.
Jeff
Jeff
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If you've seen mechanics who could screw up an oil change, you have some very serious problems that need to be dealt with.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

My brother had a Honda Civic. The dealer who changed the oil had to replace the oil pan because the threads were messed up. I had similar problems with my car, except that the quicky oil place put a Helicoil in without even asking me (fortuantely, it still works and seals ok). (I no longer go to quicky oil change places.)
The oil change place could forget to drain the oil or fill it up again. They could leave the oil filter loose.
So, yeah, problems do happen when the oil is changed. Fortunately, they are relatively rare. But they do happen.
Jeff
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I have to chime in here about my recent oil change at a "quickie oil" shop. I often check the oil level after a change just to be curious. I did and the dip stick showed very high level and oil was dark, not fresh. Also high level is not good.
I drained out the oil and put in 5 1/2 quarts of fresh oil. (I have a Jeep, and do not have to jack it up....also I have in the past have done my oil and filter changes but not too frequently lately...getting old, now.)
I drained out 7 quarts (1 and 3/4 gallon jugs full) and it appeared that they drained only part of the oil and topped it off with fresh oil. That is what the oil color looked like. There was a new filter.
I have a local repair shop where I usually go to and will in the future.
Dave C.
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I never have my oil changed by anyone unless I can watch what they are doing, including watch them check the dipstick after filling the crankcase, letting the engine run, and stopping the engine.
I always find a quick lube that will let me watch them, usually standing just outside the garage in front of the car.
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 12:27:45 -0600, observer wrote:

After reading the previous posts and to just address those that thought I was being cheap I wasn't.... frugal perhaps but never meant to sacrifice the car over the money. I just didn't want to replace clean old oil if it was not any concern for the health of the car but as some pointed out, it could be so I won't chance it. And yes, the car is not used every week and does short hops 99 percent of the time when used. Ok, for those that replied thanks and I will change its oil when it gets inspected (for convenience not as an inspection concern for me).
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There is usually a time limit on the interval as well. For many European cars running synthetics it's 1 year or 15,000 miles if not more. GM/Hondas with oil sensors will tell you up to 12,000 miles. As others said, your Corolla is 5000 miles or 6 months.
A worn engine puts out a lot of pollutants. That's not the way to help the environment either.
On Jan 3, 10:27 am, observer wrote:

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