P0135 P0141 and P0155 code with brand new O2 sensor

I have a 01 Lexus IS300 , my OBDII reader show these three code P0135 ,P0141 and P0155 , and they happen to be O2 Heater , so I went
ahead and changed out the o2 sensor, I purchased a Bosch universal sensor 4 wires. ( well, I bought them online and they happen to be 4 wires o2 sensor for ford , but then I assume all 4 wires sensor are the same ...and I realize that the heater resistance are different between car , correct me if I"m wrong) as a result the code still pop up , so then I tried to trick the computer by use the working sensor which is the B2S2 ( no code appear to be for the sensor) so I shared that Heater signal to all other sensor, drove for 120miles no code and the CHK engine light come back on again, now it pop a code for P0161 .... I'm so confused and tired of this engine light... can somebody help me
I haven't measure the Universal (ford) Bosch O2 Sensor heater resistance but I have been reading up they are about 4-8ohm.... the FSM said it should be at 11-16ohm , can I trick the ECU by adding a resistor to it ? or I really have to get the Denso O2 sensor?
are all the Denso sensor heater resistance from 11-16ohm?
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You didn't mention the mileage on your car, but the sensors may be covered by the emissions warranty.
If the resistance through the "universal" O2 sensors are not the same as specified in the FSM, then they are probably going to give you a trouble code. Adding a resistor to the circuit is probably not a good idea because the sensor heaters will not warm up properly. While not all aftermarket sensors are bad, I have seen more problems related to using aftermarket sensors than OEM sensors.
It seems odd that all 4 sensors would give trouble codes so close together. By any chance, do you use really cheap gas or make lots of short trips?
Before you go and buy more O2 sensors, check the voltages for the O2 heater circuits to make sure the wiring related to those circuits are not damaged.
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Ray O
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Huge mistake. Get the right sensors. I'd get a Denso, or Toyota OE. You have four sensors, all the four wire type, two before the converter and two after. The OE applications have different part numbers for all four sensors. I assume this is due to variations in the connectors. Splicing wires from your new universal sensors to the old connectors is a good way to cause problems on low power circuits. Do the right thing, get the right parts. They may cost more, but they will work right.
You should also check your emissions warranty, sensors may have a longer coverage period that other components - especially if you are in California.
Ed
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