Why does Japan not allow US autos to be imported to their country?

Why does Japan not allow US autos to be imported to there country? Yet they are allowed to flood the US with their product?

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Muhammed Mustafo Goldstein Jr wrote:

They do allow it, and a several years ago Toyota and GM made a big fuss about exporting one of the Chevrolet models (I forget which one) in right hand drive format from the US to Japan ... the big problem was that almost nobody bought it.
The project died quietly.
John
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Two reasons;
First, Japanese cars do not have to meet the crash safety requirements that US cars must meet. Because of the extra safety features, American cars are very heavy and not very fuel efficient.
In addition, the cost of an American made vehicle is disproportionately high in Japan. Why would they buy an American Car when they can get a similar Japanese model at much less cost?
Also, Japan does not require the use of Unleaded gas, so the Catalytic Converter and ECU are again an unnecessary expense, and unleaded gas is harder to find in Japan.
Having said that, it is common to see European cars in most large Japanese cities.
Bobby

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I'd be amazed by that, considering the UK has fairly strict safety regs and imports japanese vehicles, which are among the safest. Heavy != safe, and likewise safe != heavy.

This is true.

The japanese have far higher emissions issues, unless im misinformed, thats why the UK gets loads of 8-10 year old jap cars - they have to get rid of them as they no longer comply. Also the Japanese have had EFI and cats for as long, if not longer, than most US/UK manufacturers. Their unleaded fuel is as high, if not higher quality, than the US/UK's general fuel. Hence their performance cars are mapped to run on 100 ron fuel, which is equivelent to the US's 94 ron, if not more IIRC.
With the cross posting i can only assume this was a troll?
J
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"Allow"? I'll bet it has more to do with demand. We want their cars, but they don't want ours. Why would they?
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Truckdude wrote:

Exactly
This was like when Motorola was bitching about this same thing, saying they wouldn't buy our products. Then someone there pointed out how crappy the Motorola cell phones they were talking about really were and FINALLY someone at Motorola got off their butt and started making high quality ones and they actually started selling them outside the US.
Imagine that, quality sells?
--

Steve

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they

ones

Yeh Americans make such crappy products now, the whole country is going down hill and Bush is just making it go faster. By the way its the middle of December and many of the Katrina victims are living in unheated tents. Looks like Bush gave his spiel about how he was going to help in front of the cameras then turned and walked away as ussual.
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Muhammed Mustafo Goldstein Jr Boldly typed:

Unlike TV shows where things are taken care of in an hour real life takes longer to work.
--
Happy Holidays, Dale aka Nightspirit
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Now that GM is at the end of its life cycle it is very interesting to watch
It is like seing an elephant falling down in slow motion
Maybe it is more like seing a big tree being eaten alive by figs
Question is who or what are the figs The autoworkers unions or other car competitors
It will be interesting to see how long the figs will live after the host dies
Strangler Fig: Ficus destruens Many species of fruit-eating birds eat the succulent fruits of strangler figs. The indigestible seeds are then voided by the birds and will germinate in a tree crevice or hole. The young fig starts its life as an epiphyte in the canopy unlike other tree seedlings that have to start their struggle for survival on the forest floor. It grows slowly at first, for there is little water or food for it, but its leathery leaves reduce water loss. The plant puts out long cable-like roots that descend down the host tree trunk to the forest floor and root into the soil beneath. It can then readily absorb nutrients and water and the young fig tree flourishes. The thin roots become thicker and interlace their way tightly around the supporting tree trunk. The expanding leafy crown of the strangler starts to shade the crown of the support tree and its roots start to strangle its host. The host tree slowly rots away leaving a totally independent strangler fig which may live for several hundred years or more. The most famous of all individual fig trees in the Wet Tropics are the 'Curtain' and 'Cathedral' figs, on the Atherton Tablelands.
Life Cycle of the Strangler Fig: A bird, possum, tree kangaroo or rat drops a strangler fig seed in the top of a tree. The seed gets covered with leaf mould and grows. The roots of the seed grow down the side of the host tree until they reach the ground. The initial roots take root in the ground, while more and more grow down the sides of the tree to the ground. The roots eventually totally enclose the host tree and the host dies. The tree that remains is totally the strangler fig.
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In the early '90's Porsche was losing so much money it was on the brink of going out of business. Now they are the most profitable car company on earth and recently bought a 20% share in struggling VW. We all know how Chrysler has had two near death experiences, one with the U.S. government bailing them out and one with Daimler. Today, they are the healthiest of the U.S. car makers (I know, faint praise). A few years back Nissan was in the toilet, Renault bought a large stake in them and sent over a French executive to do some plant closing and ass-kicking and today Nissan is very successful.
You think it will be any different with GM?
Hah. They just need the near-death experience to make them do what should have been done long ago.
- GRL

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According to this article, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4443794.stm Porsche AG's profit for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2005 was $1.44 billion.
According to this article, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4231691.stm Toyota Motor Corp's profit for 1 quarter was $2.85 billion. Round down to $2.5 billion times 4 quarters is annualized profit of $10 billion. I believe that Toyota is the most profitable car company in the world at this time.
--
Ray O
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I think what he really mean is profit margin. If you sell 1 billion of good, and make 500 million, that is better than selling 100 billion of goods and making the same 500 million. Porsche is a very small company. For them to be making so much money is a good thing.
Ben

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Porsche operating profit is not 50% of revenue,. According to those same articles I referenced below, Porsche's operating profit is 19% of revenue. Toyota's profit is also 19% of revenue, so profit margins are the same.
Profit margin is a valid comparison only when comparing similar sales. For example, if a child purchases an packet of Kool-Aid for 25 cents and then sells 10 servings for 25 cents each, the child's operating profit is 90% of revenue. Could anyone argue that the child's Kool-Aid sales operation is more profitable than Toyota or even Kraft Foods?
The term "profitable" is not a synonym for profit margin.
The OP's post was erroneous.
--
Ray O
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Where did you get 19% profit margin for Toyota? Porsche this year is 19%. That is very high for automotive company. Toyota is 7% this year, or about the same as last year. Porsche last year was 10%, which still beat Toyota. Industry wide, profit margin is about 2-3%. Just do a "profit margin Porsche" on google.

What is your point? No one is comparing Kool-Aid to Porsche here. We are all talking about automotive industry. Where did this Kool-Aid come from? Toyota and Porsche is a somewhat fair comparison. Although Toyota is a huge company compared to botique companies like Porsche. Obviously, if Porsche were to expand their line to be as big as Toyota, they would not have as good a profit margin. Porsche would loose their exclusivity to command such a high price for their car.

Profitable can also mean profit margin depends on how you use it. The word profitable is a very general word, you can use it anywhere. ie Is not profitable for me to continue this discussion. Or is not profitable for me to stay up late tonight. I would not say his argument was simply wrong.
Ben
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I got 19% from the articles I provided links to, which were snipped out of your post.
I Googled "profit margin porsche" as suggested and the top article from Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/sep2005/nf20050926_6364_db046.htm indicated that for a fiscal half year ended January 31, Porsche's profits were $153 million on sales of $3.7 billion or 4.1%. That number sounded too low so I found Porsche's annual report http://www.porsche.com/filestore.aspx/default.pdf?pool=uk&type=download&id=annualreport-200405&lang=none&filetype fault and 2004-2005 income to sales ratio is 18.8%, which is more in line with the other article.
From Toyota Motor Corp's web site showing the first half of FY 2006, http://www.toyota.co.jp/en/ir/financial_results/2006/semi/highlights.pdf Toyota's operating income ratio is 8.1%.

My point was that comparing profit margins for companies with vastly different sales is not necessarily a valid comparison. Porsche's 90,000 vehicle sales is a little over 1% of Toyota's 8 million vehicle sales.

The OP claimed that Porsche was the "most profitable" car company in the world. No one with any knowledge of the automotive business would agree with that statement. On the other hand, saying that Porsche's profit margins were the best in the industry could be correct.
--
Ray O
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On 12/19/05 11:05 PM, in article AiMpf.317734$ snipped-for-privacy@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net, "Benjamin Lee"

Porsche used to be part of the VW-Audi conglomerate. When did they go separate?

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VW is having a lot of problems in germany They have been decreasing the number of workers in germany many years The unions are strong but when companies do not hire they can not do a thing Same is happening to GM The unions in US are strong So strong that they are killing GM operations in the US if GM is to survive they have to close down in th US and move abroad like VW
GRL wrote:

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Unions and management are both to blame. The only thing union wants is to make the most money with the minimum amount of work. And they like to keep others from doing their job. My cousin at Ford can't even bring his presentation documents from one building to another, because the union said he is doing their job clasification. Unfortunately, the same hold of management in GM. They make millions because they are friends with the board member. They all pat each other in the back. So down they go in a death spiral. The only thing is management usually makes it out rich while the workers loose their benefits. If I were the union, I would stress survival of the company, and demand a say in decisions.
Ben

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I dont think its at the end of its life cycle, it is still the biggest car maker
it might shrink but it has a long way till it dies and along the way it prolly can and will shift its management and production method. and still be okay.

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The lifecycle of companies can vary in length just like for animals and trees Company grow and some can become very big They eventually reach their top and after a while they start to decline If GM had taken right steps many years ago they could have remained big longer Their problems have infested for so long and so deep that if they are to survive at all they will become a lot smaller They will have to sell and close down a lot of its holdings and assets In that process they will likely be overtaken by other companies GM as an invincible colossus is no more The decline has already started and there is no turning back
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