Cost to have Camry timing belt changed!


I live in Michigan and was wondering what I should expect to pay to have
the timing belt changed (routine maint.) on my '97 Camry?
Reply to
proudpop
Check the website of your local Toyota dealers for service specials. Or just call the service departments to get a quote.
According to their website, one of my local Toyota dealers offers a has a coupon special of $279.95 for 4-CYL, and $369.95 for 6-CYL vehicles to change the timing belt.
Reply to
Mark A
I have had it done by the dealer for $200 with coupon. This was for a four cylinder. They also didn't replace any of the other parts.
Reply to
badgolferman
I think the new generation has a chain, but the older ones hace a belt. Fortunately the engines are non-interference so there won't be damage to valves if the belt breaks.
Reply to
badgolferman
================== "Additional parts may cost substantially more" always appears on the specials I've seen. Depending on mileage, it's a good idea to consider changing oil seals, water pump, valve cover gasket, drive belts, pcv valve and grommet, spark plugs, coolant, transmission fluid, brake fluid and so on. Some people have had success in driving the Camrys with minimal maintenance but others, by doing all the recommended procedures, go for hundreds of thousands of miles (400K+), so if you dont' get tired of the car, the maintenance expense is less than replacement cost.
Reply to
Daniel
Besides using the dealer coupon, which is the cost of changing ONLY the timing belt, you should ask and agree on a "complete package price" for changing the oil seals, drive belts, water pump, and two pulleys. See if you can get out of the dealer with less than several hundred dollars.
I'd budget for the replacement of all the items above (not including other intermediate/major/preventative service items like valve cover gasket, hoses, plugs, etc).
For me I do the work myself and the timing job parts described are about $200.
Reply to
johngdole
Hi,
Comparing notes:
The first time I did the timing belt in my 97, 4 Cy Camry it took 8 or more hours. The second time I did it it took about 6 hours. The difficulty seems to be the need for the removal of the heavy bracket that goes between the passenger side dog bone engine mount and the engine block, and the moving of the Power Steering resuvare. Are there any shortcuts I missed? Do I need to jack up the engine to ease the removal of the bracket?
Thanks in advance
Reply to
marvinshos
The
======================== The key is to remove the crankshaft pulley first. That way you can reach the bolts from beneath.
Reply to
Daniel
There is no conceivable way you could get that package done for under $1000, dealers aren't going to give you a break because of the greater economy of doing the water pump and timing belt together. There's a formula, a repair has a set number of labor hours and the service writers must follow those procedures. You can negotiate for an overall discount of 10-15%, I've seen that done on repairs of over 3K. And of course the obligatory daily rental car at no cost to you. There's no breaks at the Toyota Dealer Service Bays, unless you work there, then there are meaningful reductions.
Reply to
<psommerhalder
The belt itself should initially take about 3-4 hours without pump/thermostat work or the time it took me to fabricate a pulley holder from scrap lumber and 3/8" grade 5 bolts. But I find that once you are familiar wit it and the car is jacked up wheels off (ready, set, start...), you really can get to it and button it back in about 30-45 minutes of time. But it's best to take you time and triple check all the work.
A crank pulley holder and 1/2" 20-inch extension, 24" $2 pry bar (for tensioning PS pump belt), 1/2" 24-inch breaker bars help, Krik-it belt tension gauge from local NAPA store, as do $12 torque wrenches (80ft/lb, 150ft/lb) on sale at Harbor Freight.
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Use a wood block padded floor jack to support the engine on the oil pan (away from the drain plug), so there isn't too much strain on the remaining engine mounts. Didn't touch the PS fluid reservoir. Used a longer than standard (8-10") 3/8" flexhead ratchet from top to remove the bolts on the right engine bracket. Slightly tight but was doable in a minute so didn't go the wheel well route.
Reply to
johngdole

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