How Often Do You Replace the Rubber Fuel Hose?

I used to replace mine every 3 years.
At vw-resource.com he recommends replacing it every 5 years.
http://www.vw-resource.com/fuel_line.html
It's always a good precaution to replace all four sections of rubber line about every five years.
John Connolly (Aircooled.Net) advises-
I strongly recommend cloth braided fuel hose. Every 6 months, you should inspect it! Bend it over 180 degrees, and if it cracks or is stiff, REPLACE IT. Leaking fuel hose is the #1 cause of those smoldering VWs you see on the side of the road. Don't be a statistic!
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On 11/12/2010 12:15 PM, Jim Ed wrote:

could not agree more!!
Rubber products such as fuel line, have a limited shelf life too. You can't tell how old the fuel hose was when you BOUGHT it.
I once bought cloth braided fuel hose for my 78 bus, and two years later I started getting fuel smells. I did what John said, started bending the fuel hose and I didn't get very far until it snapped! Nowhere near 90 degrees!
I don't know if the formulation or chemical additives they use in fuel changed at that time, and I was sold "old batch" fuel hose that was no longer compatible. But it was a shocker. "Brand new" fuel hose dried up to a crisp in 2 years. Insane.
Jan
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You might want to concider another type of fuel line.
Ive been using parker and other Aviation fuel / oil lines lines for a long time. On oil coler and transmissin lines on my other cars.
On my other vehicles.
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus/ap/hose_fuel.html
http://www.parker.com/portal/site/PARKER/menuitem.7100150cebe5bbc2d6806710237ad1ca/?vgnextoid υc9b5bbec622110VgnVCM10000032a71dacRCRD&vgnextfmtήfault&vgnextdiv=&vgnextcatida57117&vgnextcat=RUBBER+HYDRAULIC+HOSE+-+NORTH+AMERICA&Wtky=HOSE
There's plenty of suppliers. But theres not going to be any metric.
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When I was looking for my present T3 about 20 years ago I was surprised by how many cars I looked at did not use clamps on the fuel line. Not even on the fuel pump right next to distributor!. This was after having been hassled by some Govt inspector for my beetle annual inspection for having a couple of rust spots on the headlight reflector. Idiot had his priorities right!!!. My reliable supplier of parts though will only supply OEM cloth covered hose. He seems to recall VW never used clamps with OEM hose. Dunno about that. Keeping on topic though I have had the OEM hose he supplied me with about 7-8 years ago and it is still supple, no evidence of seepage. For things like fuel hoses, brake lines I try to go OEM or at least German. Cost a bit more but lasts a darn sight longer. John
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Some hose dont need clamps. Like the braided ones on my diesel injectors on my Golf. No clamps no leaks, last a decade.
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I,m not familiar with the VW diesels. First glance you would think high pressure ergo must be clamps?. But if they,ve gone 10 years without a leak it,s obviously kosher. I seem to recall there always being clamps on my air cooled stuff dating from the 60,s. Wonder if it was a VW Aust measure for the hotter climate????. Or just evidence of more overly cautious old sods. John
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On 11/14/2010 3:03 AM, John wrote:

The factory did not use clamps in the fuel lines. They used the proper 5.5mm fuel lines. A diameter that is no longer available, and the closest one being 6mm, fits too loose. So.... clamp them. And not with those "garden hose" type clamps, but proper fuel line clamps that leave no gaps.
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"Jan Andersson" wrote in message > The factory did not use clamps in the fuel lines. They used the

an often repeated myth... vw did see fit to use bandclamps on fuel lines after moving from hardlines to rubber hose...
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On 15/11/10 18:53, Joey Tribiani wrote:

Often seen also, not a myth at all.
I've had several original VWs from 60's and none of them have had clamps on fuel lines until I installed them. Newer ones had partial clamping, not all hoses.
You'd have to have factory advertisements showing clamps to convince me that factory used them and they magically have vanished from all I've had/repaired.
--
Tuomas - VWs:'63 typ14, '65 typ34 & '61 typ2

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"Tuomas" wrote in message

pinched bandclamps came on the pressure side of the fuel pump, and they are visible in shots from factory owner's manuals, if you wish to check it out... some years have clearer shots than others... it is, indeed, a myth that vw did not use hoseclamps on fuel lines...
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The only fuel hose for my '73 Beetle that I have been satisfied with in the past 18 years is what I get from CB Performance.
http://www.cbperformance.com/catalog.asp?ProductID=574
The hose I got from other vendors had a black braided cloth around it.

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"How Often Do You Replace the Rubber Fuel Hose?"
I replace it every time there is an engine fire. Just like when forestry experts found out that allowing lightning caused fires to burn is healthier for the forest in the long run, so should VW fires be allowed to run their course. Afterward, the rebuilt vehicle is better than the old one. That is why I use genuine NOS fuel line without clamps. I also have a see-through glass fuel filter that is suspended between the fuel pump and the carb and allowed to swing free. I don't have a fire extinguisher on board. Just by 2’. Don't assume that I'm an expert just because I'm posting here.
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Wouldn,t you be better off with a plastic filter? Cheers John
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On 11/16/2010 9:47 PM, John wrote:

The filter is made of fine mesh and is reusable after cleaning it. The ends unscrew with a wrench. O-rings provide the seal. This is the second one I've had. While I was disassembling the first one in a kneeling position the glass cylinder fell out of my hand onto the concrete and broke quite easily in a drop of less than two feet.
I don't actually have it hanging above the case. I molded some hard setting clay to fit around it as it rests on the case. And it's positioned in the line leading into the fuel pump, not the line between the pump and the carb.
By the way, I notice you always use a comma as an apostrophe. Is that how Aussie's are taught to do it? In Europe they use a comma as a decimal instead of a period.
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My apologies Randall, I was just being a silly bu...er . A poor attempt at humour!. I actually had one of those type on my 1300 Beetle back in 67 and I,d buy another of that type of filter if I could get one..These days though they are all those nasty little moulded plastic things. That was beautiful little car. I commuted 160 miles a day for about 4 years ( nearly killed myself on the first day with its evil handling) , when I sold her the compression was so low when ignition was turned off the engine spun for 3-4 seconds. Apart from a seized front right slave cylinder it never missed a beat. Which is another thing. On all my VW,s the right front slave cylinder/caliper has caused issues. Seizing mainly, purely coincidence? Cant think of any other reason.
Cheers John
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On 11/18/2010 12:28 AM, John wrote:

It's a little known fact that in Australia, South Africa, Japan, India, the British Isles, and just about everywhere that the British left their stamp -- the right front wheel cylinder on every vehicle will seize before the left one will. In the US, Canada, most of Europe, and Latin America -- the left front wheel cylinder will be the first to seize. In China both wheel cylinders seize at the same rate, probably due to poor machining tolerances.
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And if you are right on the equator, all four or none? One of those imponderables.
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On 11/19/2010 3:57 AM, John wrote:

the side of the vehicle that sees the curb or ditch side, gets less dirt thrown around. The side that sees oncoming traffic gets sprayed more and sees more dirt, water, salt(winter) and stuff that's thrown up by oncoming traffic. Just a thought...
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I'm not going to agree. The left side gets tore up more in the US. As the driver misses everything on the right side. Pot holes , mud , everything. And if you go off there edge of the road. Its the right side. All my cars get hammered on the right side first. Also the curb side gets sprayed more as the slush is on the curb side , not in the middle . US roads at least. drain to the curb well . They're high in the middle. But the puddles and crap are at the curb.
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Just for interest went and dragged out all my manuals. Clymer manages to avoid all photos of a connected carby. "Scientific Publications" published Service Manuals in Australia for all car brands. Were a bit rudimentary. For the early T3 carbs ( centrally located) there was definitely no clamps. For all twin carburetted T3,s there is definitely clamps on all fuel connections. The crimp type that leaves a small non crimped region!. For Beetles was a bit indistinct but almost certainly not! You could argue though that if that was the engine they stripped down to do the manual it might be all just sitting together and not functional. Cheers John
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