bad rotors on blazer?

My blazer started to make a scraping noise as I drive it. When I first start up the car, there is no noise; but the longer I drive the louder the sound gets. The scraping noise is a short and rhythmic one, and it
seems whenever the wheel rotates to this certain position, it makes that noise. So I took it to the garage and was told that the back side of rear rotors were rusted and started to flake off. The cost for replacing them exceeds $600.
I had the car brand new for only 4 years and had been constantly driving it. Why would the rotors rust like that? Is it normal? More importantly, is this what’s causing the noise? And do rotors cost that much? Thanks.
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Rotors should not cost that much. Don't know if they are trying to sell you into getting new pads and calipers? $600 sounds too much but I'm no expert. I just know that for $600, I'd look into doing it myself and see if I can do it for under $100.. My friends rotors only cost $34 each. Her's is simple to install. Literally pops out.
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SIX HUNDRED BUCKS!!!!--you're getting ripped And rotors don't "rust", but they will score major grooves if the pads wear out
S-10 front brakes are real easy to do (at least the older ones are) Ya need a cheap floor jack, some stands, lug wrench, 4" or larger C-Clamp, a 3/8 hex drive socket (or perhaps a T-55 socket) and a 10 mm combo wrench Have the rotors turned at a machine shop, (25 bucks for both of them) or replace them with new ones for (at the most) 50 bucks each
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Actually they do RUST, they also have been known to delaminate. Nothing to do with bad pads. The rotors themselves rot. 600 bucks is high IF they are only changing the rotors. I would bet that price includes new calipers,new pads, new hardware, new rotors. Some of those parts are RIDICULOUS if you buy them from a dealer. The rotors that have the problems cannot be cut because the iron itself is junk. Plus many newer rotors don't have much meat left when you cut them.
FYI here is MY current cost on those items (this is before markup and tax) Rotor - 74.79 x 2 = 149.58 Caliper (loaded) 88.95 W 4 wheel disc brakes x 2 = 177.90 68.96 W/O 4 wheel discs x 2 = 137.92 Hardware kit = 14.08
301.58 or 341.56 just for parts.
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Steve


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"" wrote: > Actually they do RUST, they also have been known to > delaminate. Nothing > to do with bad pads. The rotors themselves rot. > 600 bucks is high IF they are only changing the rotors. > I would bet that price includes new calipers,new pads, new > hardware, new > rotors. Some of those parts are RIDICULOUS if you buy them > from a > dealer. The rotors that have the problems cannot be cut > because the iron > itself is junk. Plus many newer rotors don't have much meat > left when > you cut them. > > FYI here is MY current cost on those items (this is before > markup and > tax) > Rotor - 74.79 x 2 = 149.58 > Caliper (loaded) > 88.95 W 4 wheel disc brakes x 2 = 177.90 > 68.96 W/O 4 wheel discs x 2 = 137.92 > Hardware kit = 14.08 > > 301.58 or 341.56 just for parts. > > > -- > Steve > >
> > > SIX HUNDRED BUCKS!!!!--you're getting ripped > > And rotors don't "rust", but they will score major grooves > if the pads > > wear out > > > > S-10 front brakes are real easy to do (at least the older > ones are) > > Ya need a cheap floor jack, some stands, lug wrench, 4" or > larger > > C-Clamp, a 3/8 hex drive socket (or perhaps a T-55 socket) > and a 10 mm > > combo wrench > > Have the rotors turned at a machine shop, (25 bucks for both > of them) > > or replace them with new ones for (at the most) 50 bucks > each > > > > > > -
Thanks for the detailed cost calculation, Steve.
If the original rotors are as junky as you said, then they do need to be replaced instead of resurfaced. Also the pads, since they have rust on them. But is it necessary to replace the calipers? One mechanic says that it is probably caused by bad calipers so that the back side of the rotors and the pads are not properly aligned and eventually rust built up due to the lack of contacts. Does this sound like a possibility?
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"blazer10" wrote:

THey are not "Junk" they just can rust a bit easy. The reason the pads rust is because of a high mettalic content. You could switch to a less aggressive pad too with no ot little metalic content too.
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What usually happens is the bolts get a little rust on them and cause the caliper to hang. It may hang straight or cocked enough to cause a problem. For most shops it is not worth the time to rebuild a caliper since it is actually faster to just replace them and bleed the system. Just noticed you are saying these are the rear discs that are bad. That throws a few wrenches in the works. Namely the rear brake rotors are actually rotors and drums in one unit. The parking brake shoes are inside the hat.
So revised parts list-
Rotors - 111.79 ea. Calipers - 72.79 ea. loaded with Ultra premium Ceramic pads. Disc alignment kit - 14.16 ea. Pin boot kit - 4.11 ea. Brake shoe kit (includes revised retainer hardware) - 65.79
So your now at - 471.49 for parts.
I would say to replace the rotors with a GOOD replacement (not the cheapest on the rack) Replace the pads with a ceramic composite set (no rust and no dust, usually less noise as well) Replace the calipers as a precaution (How long have they been sticking? How hot have they gotten as a result? Has that caused any damage? - I don't know and neither does the shop and since the factory calipers have a phenolic piston why take a chance) Pull the front brakes and check them as well as replace the front pads with ceramics to match the rears.
43.79 for the pads. Those are ACDelco Durastop ceramics.
Bleed the system and send you down the road.
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"" wrote:
> > > "" wrote: > > > Actually they do RUST, they also have been known to > > > delaminate. Nothing > > > to do with bad pads. The rotors themselves rot. > > > 600 bucks is high IF they are only changing the rotors. > > > I would bet that price includes new calipers,new pads, > new > > > hardware, new > > > rotors. Some of those parts are RIDICULOUS if you buy > them > > > from a > > > dealer. The rotors that have the problems cannot be cut > > > because the iron > > > itself is junk. Plus many newer rotors don't have much > meat > > > left when > > > you cut them. > > > > > > FYI here is MY current cost on those items (this is > before > > > markup and > > > tax) > > > Rotor - 74.79 x 2 = 149.58 > > > Caliper (loaded) > > > 88.95 W 4 wheel disc brakes x 2 = 177.90 > > > 68.96 W/O 4 wheel discs x 2 = 137.92 > > > Hardware kit = 14.08 > > > > > > 301.58 or 341.56 just for parts. > > > > > > > > > -- > > > Steve > > > > Thanks for the detailed cost calculation, Steve. > > > > If the original rotors are as junky as you said, then they > do need to > > be replaced instead of resurfaced. Also the pads, since > they have > > rust on them. But is it necessary to replace the calipers? > One > > mechanic says that it is probably caused by bad calipers so > that the > > back side of the rotors and the pads are not properly > aligned and > > eventually rust built up due to the lack of contacts. Does > this sound > > like a possibility? > > > > -- > > What usually happens is the bolts get a little rust on them > and cause > the caliper to hang. It may hang straight or cocked enough to > cause a > problem. For most shops it is not worth the time to rebuild a > caliper > since it is actually faster to just replace them and bleed the > system. > Just noticed you are saying these are the rear discs that are > bad. That > throws a few wrenches in the works. > Namely the rear brake rotors are actually rotors and drums in > one unit. > The parking brake shoes are inside the hat. > > So revised parts list- > > Rotors - 111.79 ea. > Calipers - 72.79 ea. loaded with Ultra premium Ceramic pads. > Disc alignment kit - 14.16 ea. > Pin boot kit - 4.11 ea. > Brake shoe kit (includes revised retainer hardware) - 65.79 > > So your now at - 471.49 for parts. > > I would say to replace the rotors with a GOOD replacement (not > the > cheapest on the rack) > Replace the pads with a ceramic composite set (no rust and no > dust, > usually less noise as well) > Replace the calipers as a precaution (How long have they been > sticking? > How hot have they gotten as a result? Has that caused any > damage? - I > don't know and neither does the shop and since the factory > calipers have > a phenolic piston why take a chance) > Pull the front brakes and check them as well as replace the > front pads > with ceramics to match the rears. > > 43.79 for the pads. Those are ACDelco Durastop ceramics. > > Bleed the system and send you down the road. > > > -- > Steve W. > > > > -
Hi guys,
thank you all for all the information. I just got back from Midas and had them take a look at the vehicle. They said the front rotors are too thin to be machined, so they need replacement. The back ones still have some meat on them, and they can still be machined. All the brake pads need to be replaced, and the ceramic ones would cost $114 a set.
So the overall cost here are like this:
Two sets of Ravin ceramic brake pads 114 x 2 = 228
front rotors 90 x 2 = 180
plus the labor which are $100 for the pads, $16.45 for the rotors and $16.45 for bleeding, and $22.37 for resurfacing, once again, it will be a little less than $700!
holy cow...
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"blazer10" wrote:

This is a waste of your money big time and be advised that ceramic pads are very hard on rotors and if you keep truck you will be replacing the rotors again soon if you use them. When you brake there is a LOT of heat and friction and something has to "give". Ideally you want the pads soft enough so that they do not wear the rotors. I have original rotors on all my vehcials and one is 26 years old. I do not use hard or exotic pads and replace the pads as needed a litle bit more often but a LOT cheap than replacing pad and rotors every brake job.
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"" wrote: > SIX HUNDRED BUCKS!!!!--you're getting ripped > And rotors don't "rust", but they will score major grooves if > the pads > wear out > > S-10 front brakes are real easy to do (at least the older ones > are) > Ya need a cheap floor jack, some stands, lug wrench, 4" or > larger > C-Clamp, a 3/8 hex drive socket (or perhaps a T-55 socket) and > a 10 mm > combo wrench > Have the rotors turned at a machine shop, (25 bucks for both > of them) > or replace them with new ones for (at the most) 50 bucks each
I know they were trying to rip me off there. Those are the rotors on the rear wheels, and the pads need to be replaced as well.
One place I asked said the rotors would cost a little short of $60 per piece, but they will charge $70 for the labor.
Another place asks for $193 per piece, and charges $17 per hour for the labor.
The third place says they could do the job for $155.64, but if I need to get my pads replaced, I need to throw in another $70...
I dont know...
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accordingly. There are places that use cheap parts and still charge as if they are using the good stuff, and there are cut rate places that use cheap parts and unskilled shade trees and charge way less. Occansionally you find a one horse garage that uses good parts, with a far mark up, and under values his labor.( I got one of these, and he always gets paid a bit more than he asks because I know how much it should cost, and he always does an out standing job)
As for design, I think rear disc brakes on a truck has to be the worst idea ever come up with, worse than fords one year "Unibody" 1/2 ton fleet side back in the sixties.
Whitelightning
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-------- Original Message --------
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Why? Is there a valid reason you think this?
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The rear axle and wheel areas on a truck are pretty unsheilded from road debris, salt and snow build up, mud etc. Often they get dunked on boat ramps. Every one I have seen the rotors are rusted, the caliper slides froze, the inboard pad wore to nothing chewing the rotors, the outboard almost 75% left. I saw the same things on many cars as well. Keep in mind I reside in Florida, we dont have snow and road salt to contend with, but even non snow bird cars exhibited problems with rusted rotors and froze slides. I was always thankful that although I am a Yankee to the marrow, I resided in Florida making a living as a mechanic. The only set up I didnt see this a problem on were Corvettes because they used fixed mount calipers with inner and outer pistons, and other cars with a similar set up. However fixed calipers tend to be noisier than floating calipers, especially if the rotor is solid instead of vented, and they are more sensitive to run out and lack of parallelism, meaning they pulsate easier.. One way on the vented rotors manufacturers have tried to fix the noise issue is one rotor surface is often a tad thicker than the other, the idea being the harmonics off set one another and cancel the noise out. By side I mean of the rotor not on the car. Have to be carefull with this because if the difference is too great, then the thinner side's pads will run hotter than the thicker side's pads. This is one reason I think rotors should be changed in pairs if there is going to be a major difference in the thickness of the rotors side to side, it can cause a pull when hot. And of a personal opinion, I have driven many vehicles with four wheel disc brakes, and with the exception of a few exotics, like a Ford Lola a buddy had in Germnay, and the late 60's through late 70's, early 80's Corvettes, I've never driven one that stopped as well as a disk/drum combo.
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Same thing here in NY. Also agree about the disk/drum being a better set-up. Unless your racing a vehicle full time drums in the rear work better. The "well they heat up and fade" comments are the common rejoinder I hear. The problem is I have never heard folks who actually tow and use their trucks as trucks complain about the drum brakes. I have heard people complain about the disks though. Repair costs are ridiculous and they are EASILY damaged by rocks and salt. About the only thing I can think of that disks are better at is drying rapidly when they get wet, the flip side to that is when your really working them and the get hot and then get splashed with water they warp. Oh well just keeps shops in business I guess....
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I work at Chevrolet Dealership and own a 2000 Chevy Blazer. OEM rotors suck, they are of a poor design and made of inferior metal. The rear rotors also house the parking brake so they look like a drum to disk brake conversion gone bad. These rotors will rust. It happened to my Blazer and at first I thought the front bearing was shot, from the way it sounded. I had my mechanic friend get it up on a rack and look it over. He found that the rear rotor had a chunk of rusted metal caught inbetween the pad and rotor. So I needed new pads and rotors, the old rotors were not able to be turned. (sound familiar??) OEM rotors (AC Delco) were @ $100 some odd a piece (with employee discount)and pads were @ $90 for OEM/AC Delco (I think). The highest quality from NAPA were @ $70 list and NAPA pads were @ $60 list plus @ 2hrs labor costing $70 an hour plus shop supplies, will get your brake job up to $600 bucks quick (if your are going through a GM dealer requesting OEM parts). I say get the highest quality pads and rotors you can find and do it yourself, or pick a shop or friend you know and trust and have them use the highest quality parts you can afford.
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