Honey Coloured Oil in Diesel

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Hello All,
My brother in Sydney drives a 2004 Land Cruiser with a V-8 turbo-diesel that has logged over 65,000 kms. I was totally SHOCKED to see the crankcase oil still honey-colored when we
it drained for an oil change. My 1998 Tahoe 6.5TD's oil is black 100 miles after an oil change, then again, it's logged 165,000 miles. What do the Toyota TDs have that US diesel engines do not?
Franko
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Franko wrote:

QUALITY
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"Franko" wrote:

Tighter tolerances and less blowby and better fuel quality too (less sulpher)
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toy is different then comes out of it when its pumped into a chevy or ford or dodge. Gee what will they think of next.
Whitelightning
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"Whitelightning" wrote:

If Sydney is austrialia, they have much lower sulpher in there fuel down there. As a matter of fact, it the name of profit for oil companies, the US has some of the porest quail diesl fuel in the world for major economic countries. ALso "Yota" does use tigher clearances than GM does because they can take more time to get it right (because labors costs are not out of site that they are trying to cut corners every where) so there is less blow by to contaminate oil in engine and they may be running lower boost as well which means lower cylinder pressures and less leakage as well. A GM Dma use between 22 and 25 PSI or boost at full power in stock form and you are going to have some blowby verses a tighter lower boost engine. Thast is the reason detriot desiel vehcial have large oil capacities because if the did not the oil would be dirty in a short period of time. Not all of the extra oil is actually needed to properly lube engine, only to extend change intervals.
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So Franko, the original poster, is flying all the way to Austrialia to change the oil in his brothers Toy, and then back to the USA to change the oil in his 1998 Tahoe. Now I understand the fuel difference coming into play.
Whitelightning
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Hey, Whitelightning,
Yeah, but I charge them enough for my services... You want anything from down unda'? I'll be there around April'05 for a wedding and some pig hunting (not at the wedding, that is).
My other kid brother's got a relatively new Nissan TD in-line six and a bro-in-law's got an older Nissan NA diesel in-line six -- I'll check theirs out, too. My sis has got a 2000 Land Cruiser NA diesel in-line six and the oil in that one isn't honey-colored anymore, but it sure ain't as black as my Tahoe's.
I might try some of that Restore stuff and see if it'll improve the blow-by. Dang! (translates to "Bloody Hell!") I'm really piqued by this honey-colored oil situation...
Regards, Franko
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Don't sweat the oil color so much - I've seen big rigs with Dietroit Diesels, Cummins and Cats that blacken oil in a heartbeat but as long as they get regular maintenance they always seem to go forever. While Restore did seem to improve the situation for me somewhat, it did take several oil changes (every 3,000 miles) with a can of this stuff at every change before I started to notice any difference. The first thing I noticed was my oil consumption started to drop. I went from using 1.5 qts every 3,000 miles to .5 qts. You have to use this stuff religiously, and I was convinced it was worth the extra money.
Cheers - Jonathan

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Out of curioustiy what oil are you using?
Whitelightning
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In my old '95 Chevy with the 6.5L turbo diesel (the truck in which I was using the Restore) I used Shell Rotella-T 15w-40 and changed it every 3,000 miles. That motor only took 7 quarts.
In my current '04 Chevy 2500HD with the Duramax I use Amsoil full synthetic 15w-40 (10 qts every 5,000 miles), but before anyone goes off on me about using Amsoil let me just say that I can't find 15w-40 in Mobil-1 or Rotella full synthetic locally. Amsoil ships it directly to my house and is pretty competitive in price, but I make no claims that it is any better or worse than any other full synthetic. I just use it because I can't get anything else more conviently. If I could go to any of the half dozen or so local auto parts stores and get Mobil-1 15w-40 at the same price or cheaper than what I'm paying for Amsoil then I would do it just to save myself the shipping cost. The reason why I don't buy Mobil-1 over the internet and have it shipped is because the Amsoil distributor is an hour away in NW Orlando, and sometimes when I'm in that part of town I can go pick it up and save myself the shipping.
Cheers - Jonathan

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(took me awhile to break away from straight 30) I've used it in Macks, Whites, Detroits, and Cummins (been lucky and avoided cat power most of my trucking life :) ) But oil is one of those things you can argue all day long and not change anyone's mind. Kinda like trying to show a ford owner the error of his ways.
Whitelightning
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"" wrote:
> > > In my old '95 Chevy with the 6.5L turbo diesel (the truck in > which I was > > using the Restore) I used Shell Rotella-T 15w-40 and changed > it every > 3,000 > > miles. That motor only took 7 quarts. > > > > In my current '04 Chevy 2500HD with the Duramax I use Amsoil > full > synthetic > > 15w-40 (10 qts every 5,000 miles), but before anyone goes > off on me about > > using Amsoil let me just say that I can't find 15w-40 in > Mobil-1 or > Rotella > > full synthetic locally. Amsoil ships it directly to my > house and is > pretty > > competitive in price, but I make no claims that it is any > better or worse > > than any other full synthetic. I just use it because I > can't get anything > > else more conviently. If I could go to any of the half > dozen or so local > > auto parts stores and get Mobil-1 15w-40 at the same price > or cheaper than > > what I'm paying for Amsoil then I would do it just to save > myself the > > shipping cost. The reason why I don't buy Mobil-1 over the > internet and > > have it shipped is because the Amsoil distributor is an hour > away in NW > > Orlando, and sometimes when I'm in that part of town I can > go pick it up > and > > save myself the shipping. > > > > Cheers - Jonathan > > > I've been a fan of Chevron Delo 400 15W-40 siense shortly > after it came out > (took me awhile to break away from straight 30) I've used it > in Macks, > Whites, Detroits, > and Cummins (been lucky and avoided cat power most of my > trucking life :) ) > But oil is one of those things you can argue all day long and > not change > anyone's mind. > Kinda like trying to show a ford owner the error of his ways. > > Whitelightning
The best thing that can be said about any good oil is change it regularly and more often under severe service and you will get best possible engine life, gas or diesel.
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Before anyone starts spouting off about "quality" or anything else, the oil in my '04 Duramax comes out every 5000 miles looking honey colored as well, and I just hit 30,000 miles on the motor. However, I could change the oil in my old '95 6.5L turbo diesel, drive it around the block and it would be pitch black again. Why? Tighter tolerances might be the answer, but the cause is the higher compression ratio. The compression ratio in my 6.5L diesel was around 21:1, but more modern diesels are in the neighborhood of 15 or 16:1. The 6.5's had one of the highest compression ratios for any light duty diesel in automotive use, mostly because it was smaller than the competition, had indirect injection and didn't have an intercooler - so it had to make up the difference somewhere.
In addition, the newer fuel injection systems like the common rail design in my Duramax give a more complete burn of the fuel with less soot to make its way into the motor oil. Before I finally traded my 6.5L in on my current truck, I was using a can of Restore oil additive at every oil change and was beginning to notice a gradual improvement in oil appearance (which I did every 3,000 miles on that truck).
The diesel market is now very competative in the US, but somehow I notice that Toyota (among many other asian brands) just don't play here. You really got to ask yourself why not. You only need three things to enter this market - a full-sized truck, competitive numbers from your motor and tranny, and be able to meet the current emission standards. Don't try to tell me that this market segment is too small to be of any interest to them, the number of diesels in light duty trucks has skyrocketed in the past several years and the profit margin for the company is quite large per vehicle.
My only regret with US manufacturers is that they don't offer more smaller diesels in their half-ton and compact trucks and SUV's. You don't need a Duramax V-8 in the Colorado or Trailblazer, but a smaller 4- or 5-cylinder diesel with decent power and good gas mileage would be fantastic. Personally, I think they would be great sellers.
Cheers - Jonathan

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tilt master. I've rented them a number of times and was always amazed at the power and fuel mileage. And in the 70's during the first gbas shortage one of the hottest conversions was a 3 cyl detroit into 1/2 ton trucks. Everyone knows Oldsmobiles failed 5.7, but they also had a 4.3 V-6 they used in the Cutlass Ciera that was a good engine. what happened to that one? One of the top 10 stupidest things GM ever did was to spin off Detroit into DDC, which got bought by Mercedes in 2000.
There is another factor to consider as well and that is the maintanence needs. You can cut cornors on a gas engine, but a diesel will bite you hard if you do it to it. Someone who buys a bigger truck, pulling heavy trailers or using it for work will probably take better care of it then joe "I wanna car looks like a truck" will. and the manufactures may be taking that into consideration.
Whitelightning
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"Whitelightning" wrote:

Me too, I rented one many years ago for a cross country move from Budget. My combined weight was about 18K (cargo and tow dolly with a car) and that little 4cyl did a creditable job. I was able to amintain 60 to 65 with it on reasonable flat ground and I dropped down to 45 mph in the I-80 pass near Laramie Wyo. Averaged about 14MPG as a recall.
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The break-in period must also be considered -- it is so critical for maintaining the tight tolerances. I remember breaking-in my brother-in-law's '86 5.7L Suburban following the manual to the letter (speeding up, slowing down, not exceeding a certain speed, etc.). That 'burb hardly used any oil between oil changes and it was honey-colored as well as it came out.
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In article

But they're talking about diesels.
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"aarcuda69062" wrote:

Diesel need to break in too and pushing them too hard to soon can result in rings not seating properly.
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Hello SnoMan and Jonathan,
How much longer a break-in period do diesels need than gassers? I've heard people say 100,000 miles and the diesel is "only breaking in" but, realistically, how long? Also, are the break-in procedures different?
Regards, Franko
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On my '04 Duramax I changed the original oil with non-synthetic at 500, 1000, and 3000 miles. Then I switched to full synthetic at 5,000 miles and change it every 5,000 with the same. I didn't take any long trips until after 500 miles, and then didn't tow anything until after 1000 miles.
At 30,000 miles my oil consumption is less than 1/2 quart every 5,000 miles (take out 9 1/2, put in 10). I use Amsoil 15w-40 full synthetic, but before anyone goes off on me about using Amsoil let me just say that I can't find 15w-40 in Mobil-1 locally. Amsoil ships it directly to my house and is pretty competative in price. I make no claims that it is any better or worse than any other full synthetic, I just use it because I can't get anything else more conviently. If I could go to any of the half dozen or so local auto parts stores and get Mobil-1 15w-40 at the same price or cheaper than what I'm paying for Amsoil then I would do it just to save myself the shipping cost. When I'm feeling really cheap, the distributor is just an hour away in north west Orlando.
Cheers - Jonathan
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