2.7T Gas Mileage

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I am a recent owner of a 03 2.7T and am getting about 18 mpg. I am running premium gas and most of the driving is highway. The computer claims I am
getting an average of 21.6. Does this sound right? If not, what can I do to improve the mileage? Thanks, K
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That's probably right unless it's a diesel. Audis suck gasoline.
I don't know the specifics of your car, but some of them can run on cheaper gas with no ill effect for light driving. Fill up with 87 or 89 (US grades) for weekday commuting then put in 91 or 92 for the weekend trip out of town.
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* Kevin McMurtrie:

Not unless used in a country with low fuel quality. Remember that these engines are developed with European ROZ95/98 in mind and have to be modified/limited (electronically and/or mechanically) to run somewhat reliable in countries that have inferior fuel quality standards than western Europe.
Benjamin
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"Benjamin Gawert" wrote

Are you saying all Audis sold in the US have to be modified in order to run reliably here?
Are you aware of two different formulas used around the world to calculate the octane number?
Regards, Pete
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* Pete:

I assume "here" for you means the US? If so then yes. The fuel quality in the US is much lower than in western Europe. The Audis (and VWs and BMWs and Mercedes) that are made for the US contain specific modifications to run reliable with that low fuel quality.
Benjamin
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On Sun, 27 Jan 2008, Benjamin Gawert wrote:

Anecdote time. Back in 1981, I was living in New York, and owned a Camaro. I went to live in England, taking the Camaro with me. I expected the numerical miles per gallon to increase by roughly 20%, since the imperial gallon is 20% larger than the US gallon, and my driving mix was similar. In fact, it actually increased by 44%. A year later, I went back to the US, and the mpg dropped back to its former value.
Steve
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"Benjamin Gawert" wrote

Can you provide links to some documentation on this subject? It's not that I don't trust you. It's just that I'd like to find a valid source if this information.
Thanks, Pete
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Hello Pete

In European Union, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland diesel fuel must meet EN-590. More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EN_590
I know for gas[oline], there is also such a norm, but have to look up the EN number first.
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* Pete:

I don't have a link by hand. There once were some articles on a oil company website that discussed that stuff but I can't remember the link.
You can for example compare the European fuel standards (EN228 for gasoline and EN590 for Diesel) with the equivalent US standards and you'll see that the European standards are much tighter.
Besides that, if you have access to maintenance/part documentation you can compare the specifications for US and European models of certain cars. I.e. the last Volkswagen Passat with 1.8l Turbo engine (20 valve) was sold in the US with 130hp while the European version had 150hp. This was done because of the lower fuel quality.
There are other differences as well. German-made cars sold in Western Europe usually conform to the German standard which means the car must run reliable even when driving at maximum speed for a long time. Overseas versions which rarely get driven faster than 55-80 mp/h often come with downsized cooling systems, brake systems and other things which save the manufacturer money and have no influence on safety or reliability in countries with general speed limits.
Benjamin
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"Benjamin Gawert" wrote

The 1.8T never had 130hp in the US. It had 150hp initially, and then 170hp in later years.
Pete
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* Pete:

There definitely was a ~130hp version of the 1.8T engine in the old Passat (3BG). One of my flight instructors had such a car in 2003, made in Mexico. IIRC the life cycle of this version was rather short.
Benjamin
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"Benjamin Gawert" wrote

I'm sorry, but you've got it all wrong. The first time a 1.8T was offered in a Passat in the US was in 1998, and it had 150 hp. And it wasn't made in Mexico either.
The only engine that I can think of that had around 130 hp (134 to be exact) was a 2-liter non-turbo one offered back in 1990 on the Passat.
Pete
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Apparently so short that there was only one made <g>.
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Apparently so short that there was only one made <g>.
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* Pete:

I'm quite sure about that. I have seen the spec sheet, and we have been at a Volkswagen dealer in San Jose where he bought that car, and while he was giving it away for service I talked with the dealer who explaned me that he sells regular Passats made in Emden, Germany, and Passats made in or made for (I'm not sure of that) Mexico.
I know the Passat 3BG very well, and the interior quality of this Passat was noticeably worse than any 3BG I've seen before.

In 1990 there was no Passat 3BG.
Benjamin
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"Benjamin Gawert" wrote

What exactly is a Passat 3BG? I've never heard of this nomenclature out here in the US. Is it a B5? B5.5? B6? During which years was it available?
Pete
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* Pete:

3BG stands for the internal VW model nomenclature (like "D2" and "4E" for the Audi A8). The 3BG is the facelift version of the 3B (the successor of the Passat 35I).
This is a Passat 3B: <
http://www.autogaleria.pl/tapety/img/volkswagen/volkswagen_passat_1997_01_b.jpg
And these are Passat 3BG: <
http://fotogalerien.tuningzine.de/rieger_vw_passat_30102006/vw_passat_text_1.jpg
<
http://www.autopflege24.net/showshine/2007/passat/passat_index.jpg
And this is the old 35I: <
http://www.selfbase.com/car_interior_database/photos/cars/400/4400501401.jpg
The 3BG was basically made to make the Passat look more luxurious and to be able to compete with Mercedes C-class, BMW 3-series and Audi A4.

I don't know the timeframe it was sold in the US (but I doubt it differs much) but here in Germany the 35I was made from 1988 to 1996 where the 35B was introduced. It was replaced by the 3BG in 2000. The 3BG was terminated in 2005.
BTW: does the US also have the hazzle with bio ethanol mixture in regular fuel? Here in Germany the government forced that all grades of gas contain 5% of bio enthanol (E5 gas). A new law from 2006 now forces the percentage of bio ethanol to raise to 10% (E10 gas), probably starting already in 2009. Bio ethanol is very corrosive and can cause higher wear (especially in the area of valve seating), it's expensive to produce which makes the gas more expensive and also contains less energy than gas which leads to a lower gas mileage. Since it's still not really clear which older cars do tolerate E10 gas and which don't (for example, Audi says all models since 1992 can tolerate E10 - except FSI engines before 2004!) the government decided to leave around 1000 gas stations nationwide with E5 "Super Plus" (premium grade, most older cars only require lower grades) gas until 2016 where no E5 will be available any more in this country. Not only "Super Plus" is the most expensive gas grade, the E5 "Super Plus" will be even more expensive due to higher logistics and production costs. So you buy a new Ford Ka (compact car) today, you won't find any fuel for it after 2016. You have an Audi, Seat or Volkswagen with FSI engine older than 2004? Same problem. You have an Mitsubishi Carisma GDI? Same problem. And this goes on for lots of other cars, too. Besides that, even for the manufacturer it's not clear what long-term effects bio ethanol has in older cars. Isn't that great?
Benjamin
Benjamin
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Well, the 1990 Passat was the same as the 1991 - 1996 cars, so if the '3BG' nomenclature applies to the 1991 and newer, it should apply to the 1990 as well. And a quick scan of edmunds.com shows that the 2.0L I4 engine was available off and on through the '90's, until the 1.8T with 150hp debuted with the 1998 newly-rebodied Passat.
Dan D '04 A4 1.8Tq MT-6 Central NJ USA
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* Dano58:

Right, it's the Passat 35I.

No, it doesn't. 3BG was made from 2000-2005.
Benjamin
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I call bullshit....

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