WARNING - In case you have not heard

From Clark Howard.com Team Clark Howard's Team Action Center: Assume cashier's checks are phony Clark recently took a call on the show that continues to bother him. The caller trusted a buyer and took a
cashierís check from the man. Turns out that the check was not only a forgery, but it was also written out for $6,000 more than the amount asked. The polite buyer, who was really a con artist, asked if the seller would mind wiring him back the overage and everything would be square. Once the seller got a call from his bank, telling him that the check was a forgery, he was out his property plus $6,000. This is very scary. Even the FDIC has a warning at its Web site, telling banks to verify that cashierís checks are for real. But the banks donít feel they are responsible at all. One bank was recently quoted in the Boston Globe as saying the onus is on the consumer to determine whether the funds they are depositing is good. Itís a bunch of baloney. The truth is that if your account is improperly drafted and you dispute it, the bank has to pay you back. They act like they donít have to, but they do. At the same time, there is no requirement that banks have to verify whether a check is phony. So, if you get a cashierís check from someone, you must assume that itís phony. Clark used to recommend that people take cashierís checks, not personal checks. Today, if youíre selling something, take a personal check and not a cashierís check. Banks need to come up with some security measures to prevent this from happening. But until then, you have to do what you can to protect yourself. Entering into the unknown, V'ger seeks information used to maintain his Vintage Burgundy 1965 Ford Mustang 2+2 w/289 ci 4v oem A Code V8, C4 Trans, 16x8" Vintage 40 wheels, with BF Goodrich gForce T/A 225/50ZR16 tires, American Racing "Mustang" Centercaps, and a whole lot of other stuff; )
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This story of the 'overage' check is an old one still going around. You'd think people would be aware not to send money to strangers. Know who you are dealing with and deal locally if possible. If this were local the guy would go to jail.
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True, but every day, good people are sucked into bad situations. My father got an email directing him to follow a link to correct information about his bank account. He followed. This is not a stupid man. But it looked so legit he fell for it. And in the email it says that he is not to access his account for 48 hours so the changes can be entered and effected. Afterward, he questioned it all and contacted his bank, and ended up changing pin numbers etc.
I sold my 66 Mustang Fastback last May. I got a ton of emails from all over the world, and many were scams. Had I not known ahead of time, I might have been sucked in. Fortunately, someone did for me what I just did.... posted a warning, for which I will ever be greatful.
On 14 Oct 2004 16:34:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mcpmail.com (Al Bundy) wrote:

Entering into the unknown, V'ger seeks information used to maintain his Vintage Burgundy 1965 Ford Mustang 2+2 w/289 ci 4v oem A Code V8, C4 Trans, 16x8" Vintage 40 wheels, with BF Goodrich gForce T/A 225/50ZR16 tires, American Racing "Mustang" Centercaps, and a whole lot of other stuff; )
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