glowing manifold

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Hi all. We have a 440 big block engine with a 6 Pack cam in it, and a
few other hop-up goodies. When running for a while, the driver side
exhaust manifold glows bright red, like it's about to melt. The
passenger side is fine. Any suggestions on how to fix it? It was built
by a por race car engine builder a few years ago. The engine's going in
a 64 Studebaker station wagon, by the way. We also have a 70 Super Bee
we're working on, as well as many other Studebakers.
Thanks, Matthew


Re: glowing manifold


wrote:

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Either that side it running lean or you have poorer airflow through
there. It is not unusla to have a manifold clow some when working hard
and there is no worry of melting that cast in manifold as it will take
a LOT more heat than that to do it. Also,  overly retarded spark
timing can cause it to get extra hot too.
-----------------
The SnoMan
www.thesnoman.com

Re: glowing manifold


Young Captain wrote:
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I had this happen on a Briggs&Stratton OHV 14.5 HP vertical shaft engine
due to bad exhaust valve adjustment (slightly too far open, oops).
Guess it was pushing a little fuel out during the compression stroke and
some fire during ignition.  Apparently exhaust gasses are normally much
cooler by the time the power stroke is completed.

JS






Re: glowing manifold


wrote:

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Sounds like an exhaust valve problem????

--

Re: glowing manifold


Young Captain wrote:
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Something like this?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuKYBb9wPDs


Read the comments at the bottom.  Amazing ol' motor.  I guess the
constant water flow to the oil, and the steam developed, kept the oil
from breaking down faster than it did...

What I wanna know is whats that weird noise at the end...  Electric
cooling fan after losing its blades?

Now after watching that, watch this...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq86Ip2DGYQ


I'll take the 305, thanks.

JS


Re: glowing manifold


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That noise sounds to me like a high pressure gas escaping from a small
opening. It already had blown head gaskets so it might be pressurized
coolant/vapor escaping.

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Never thought I'd say this about a 305, but me too.
--
Ken



Re: glowing manifold



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Besides a lean condition, severly retarded timing will also cause manifolds
to glow red.
Late ignition of the mixture will cause the combustion process to continue
well after the exhaust valve opens, exposing the manifold(s) to higher than
normal temperature.



Re: glowing manifold

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It's prolly a peice of a ford mustand the engine ate some time ago.  It will  
pass sooner or later.  Next time it backfires and smells like shit, you'll  
know it passed the ford.

--  
MoParMaN---Remove Clothes To Reply!
--SCUD Coordinates 32.61204 North: 96.92993 West--  



Re: glowing manifold
I had a similar problem with my 8.0L Ram. Cat was plugged up and lit
the whole exhaustsystem up.  
Check for:
     blocked exhaust (retaining heat)
     hung-up exhaust valve loading raw fuel into the manifold


On Thu, 29 Jun 2006 21:13:07 GMT, "MoParMaN"

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Re: glowing manifold
On Fri, 28 Jul 2006 17:38:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nestle.com wrote:

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Low octane fuel which cause the spark to be retarded a lot at times
which makes fuel afterburn in exhaust system some can cause this too
because engine efficencny is reduced and even more gas and heat is
dumped into exhaust as it trys to make the power needed for load.  
-----------------
The SnoMan  
www.thesnoman.com

Re: glowing manifold
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Anybody got a translator for this? I tried Babelfish, and it doesn't have a  
"snoman" language.

--  
Max

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: glowing manifold
wrote:

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You know everytime you do this you do two things, One it show how
insecure your really are and two how truely clueless you are on the
dynamics of IC engine operational characteristics and principals as
well as the thremodynamic princip[les in use. If you were half as
smart as you claim to be you would stop posting dribble and read and
learn something but then there is not much chance of that. Everytime
you try to make me look bad, you make yourself look bad so have at it.
You know I acutual studies IC design in college years ago and even
wrote a few papers on it too. THe only writing you have done is
uninformed BS.  I can back up everything with science  while your is
strictly BS.
-----------------
The SnoMan
www.thesnoman.com

Re: glowing manifold
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Actually, I only do one thing, and then you write a book about it. If figure
the more you write, the more people will see you and your "facts" for what
they are.

Please post a rebuttal.


--
Max

"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: glowing manifold
Hi all. This is a kinda dumb question,what are the signs of a bad cat
converter besides mileage and glowing exhaust? Thanks for all your time.
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net


Re: glowing manifold


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It rattles like a can full of marbles when you smack it with a rubber
mallet.  A more scientific test would be to use a backpressure gauge (either
remove an O2 sensor, or drill another hold and weld in a bung) - anything
over single-digit PSI when the throttle is snapped would indicate a
restriction.



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