4WD question

I have a 2004 Ranger XLT 4 X 4 & I live in northern New England. A major winter storm will be approaching in a day or two & the roads become slippery at times. I hear a lot about not using the 4WD
on "hard pavement" but after the plows do their work & the road surfaces have been treated with salt & sand will continued usage of the 4 X 4 impose additional wear on the tranny & transfer case. I usually leave it in 2WD & shift it to 4WD only when climbing or descending hills.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I leave my Jeep in 4wd all winter. No problems and it is 22 years old now. So put it in 4wd and forget about it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fred wrote:

Read your owner's manual. There are different types of 4WD systems. Some, like Jeep's, are made to let you drive on dry pavement. Overs aren't.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jeep has all flavors of 4WD/AWD on different models, often multiple types as options on the same model. Read _your_ manual carefully.
--
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley Lake, CA, USA GPS: 38.8,-122.5

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Read the owners manual - If you have a part-time 4WD system with no center differential DO NOT leave it in 4WD while on pavement. If the wheels can't slip and you turn corners you will build up differential stresses in the drivetrain till something breaks. Whatever is weakest - a locking hub, a U-joint, a pinion gear...
You can leave the manual front hubs locked all winter if you want to, so you don't have to get out of the car and wade through mud to do that. (It will cost you a small fraction of a MPG to spin the front differential parts, but won't hurt anything.)
But leave it in 2WD mode unless you're just about to get stuck. And the minute you get clear, shift back to 2WD.
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My ranger has an electronic transfer case selector & can be employed up to 55 MPH. The manual does state not to use 4WD on dry hard pavement but up here in northern Maine, it becomes difficult to see of it is dry or not. I just rely on my judgement & keep it in 2WD until I spot a stretch of snow then it is 4WD time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would tighten up the criteria a lot - a "stretch of snow" likely isn't enough to allow wheel slip (to relieve stresses) if needed. If it's fine powder snow with no ice underneath, the tires are more than likely getting down to the pavement.
I would up the ante to only shifting into 4WD when you find 'un-plowed side street with a good 6" of snow', and other cars are not cutting ruts down to the pavement. Not for stretches where you think you might need it, reserve it for areas you *know* you'll need it.
Or wait till it gets sloppy enough that you feel it starting to lose traction and/or the rear end tries coming around on you the first time - and believe me, when it happens for real you'll know it. Next time you can feel it getting close, shift it into 4WD then.
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.