Could Ignition Key Computer Chip Be Disabled?

Hello All,
I have a 97' Taurus and I think the ignition key computer chip may be failing. Over the last 3 months I found my trunk opened twice. Can it
be a chip malfunction or some kind of short circuit? Has anyone had a similar experience? I'm positive I did not accidently trigger the open..
It's been a great car otherwise and the only regular maintainance is an oil change every 3000 miles.
I can do without the 4 buttons (Lock, Unlock, Panic, and Trunk). I never used the panic button.
I would like the oval 2 way lock/unlock buttons with the 'L' and 'U' that lock and unlock all 4 doors to continue to work as they do, but from the outside of car I only want key access for doors and trunk.
I'm ok with basic electronics, have a computer science degree but never worked on cars. If I had schematics is a do it yourself job possible? Perhaps just disconnect a few wires.. If not easy, can it be done by a mechanic or technician? Does 97 Taurus need the chip?
I greatly appreciate any advice..
Joek In Jersey
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"Passive anti-theft system" is what you're talking about, the car probably won't start without it fully operational. Replace the battery in the key fob.
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Joek wrote:

    I do not own the same car, but it seems you are talking about two devices. The FOB which is used to open the doors and trunk, and the key security feature (PATS). The chip in the key is for security and will prevent the starting of the car with an invalid key. I do not believe they are related except that they may be on the same keyring. The opening of the trunk is more likely to be due to an inadvertent depressing of the switch on the FOB. At least that has been the case with mine. I was setting off the alarm simply by leaning up against an object while the FOB was in my pocket.
    If you think it truly is opening by itself, you should be able to disconnect the solenoid that opens the trunk very easily.
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Many (all?) modern cars have the key embedded in the keyfob; i.e. the buttons are embedded on the head of the key.
My Jeep key has PATS integrated in there too; there is a single-chip device handling 315MHz RKE and 125kHz RFID for PATS. My wife's Chevy key has no PATS (it was an option she didn't want), but it has room for it.
Having said all that, I didn't know the '97 Taurus was that advanced.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

    I have a 2003 Ford product and it has a key with PATS and a separate FOB. Like I said, I don't have a 97 Taurus. I did not think that both were in one piece that long ago, but perhaps they were?

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I presume your car has the standard Ford keyfob of that vintage, with four buttons: door lock, door unlock, panic (red) and trunk/tailgate (blue). It is POSSIBLE but not likely that a collapsed dome in the fob is causing the trunk button to transmit occasionally when you jolt it.
You can open the fob, remove the domes and clean off the domes and printed carbon contacts with isopropyl alcohol (be gentle, the carbon comes off easily).
However I don't think it's a real high likelihood. Try taking out the battery and use the key as a key for a while. If you still have the problem, I'd suspect a relay or the cable/latch.
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