*NEED ASAP*1992 Ford E150 Van Needing Power Steering Line

My aunt's 1992 ford e150 van needs the power steering line replaced. Is this something I can do myself, or do I have to send it to the shop? If I can do it myself, what kind of tools will I need?

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who knows?! We dont know your skills or patience quotient.
Also you didnt bother saying whether it was the pressure or return line, and if you dont know, the short answer is: take it to the shop!
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Never volunteer to work on a van! ;)

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It's not like I really *want* to do it... but we don't have the money to take it to a shop right now... it'd be so much easier financially...
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The return line is easy, just a couple of hose clamps, usually. The pressure side is a different beast. I don't know if those are wrench type connectors or the newer spring-release ones. The local parts place can tell you when you get the replacement. The spring-release ones are really quite easy IF you have the tool. They don't have to be expensive and the parts store can show you what to use. It can be an ugly job because of the creative way some of these get routed. Making the connections is usually the easy part (if you can see the ends). Good Luck! - PoD

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On my mom's 86 sable I replaced both hoses at the same time. The low pressure is usually easily serviceable and you can probably get away with cutting off the factory crimp and installing some 5/16 fuel hose in its place. The hi pressure one can be replaced at a hydraulic shop, or you can get a brand new hose from a jobber shop.

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The return line is easy up until the uninitiated break the nipple off the PS pump reservoir... from here, the downward spiral is swift and excrutiating.... The pressure line is also easy... until the uninitiated round all the corners off the hardest to reach fitting and the box or pump has to come out for repair. The E-150 should have the Saginaw PS pump which has a disconcerting habit of winding out the pressure relief valve long before the flare nut breaks free. Parts get lost easily if someone doesn't know how many parts are supposed to be in there.
I'll take BYMs answer a bit further... if you have to ask the question "Can I do this?"... there is a 50/50 chance that you can't. Since money is a consideration in the original posters message, I would suggest that it may be far cheaper to take the van to a trained professional - it may cost more than they are willing to spend, but it doesn't take much of a mistake for shop charges to look cheap.
My best suggestion is for skinmess to have his Aunt take the van to a shop and for him to try and ease her financial burden in ways where he can be sure of his skill-set and knowledge.
Also, he should check around... I know of several shops that offer discounts for senior citizens or those with disabilities and on fixed incomes. For every heartless bum out there, there are a thousand good, decent, caring techs.
HTH

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"skinmess" wrote: 1992 ford e150 van
... needs the power steering line replaced. Can I do it myself, or do I have to send it to the shop? If I do it myself, what kind of tools will I need? ___________________________________________
Look under the van, see where the defective line begins and ends, and decide whether access is easy enough for you to remove it. If so, remove it take it to the auto parts store for comparison when you buy the replacement line ($20 - $50.)
Open-end wrenches are the tools typically needed for this job, to turn the nuts at the ends of the line. Short wrenches may be easier to swing in the limited space.
Other things to be alert for: Some ports use O-Rings or other seals. Some port fittings must be held with another wrench while tightening the line nuts.
Good Luck.
Wendy & John. _____________________________________________
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