Reprogram PCM 1996 Taurus

Check engine light came on our 96 Taurus wagon and I had the wife take it to the dealer.
The dealer recommends:
1. Replace DPFE sensor and hoses 2. Reprogram PCM
3. Clean MASS filter 4. Replace serpentine belt 5. Clean throttle body and fuel injectors 6. Replace PCV/Grommet (wallace?) 7. Replace fuel filter
Dealer also wants $750 to perform same.
No way I'm dropping 7 big ones on this list. I'm out $80 for the diagnostics and a car wash, but whatever....
With a Haynes in hand and some new jack stands from Sears, I've decide to do this work myself.
I am not the best mechanic you're going to meet so I would appreciate any insight this group would contribute. For instance, is item #2 covered under the 8/80 Emissions warranty?
TIA - Steve
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What was the code that was pulled?
For $750, you should drop $200 to $300 for an OBDII scanner so you can pull your own codes.
You can easily replace your own serpentine, replace the PCV valve, and I believe the DPFE sensor and hoses, IF that's the problem.
Your CEL will not come on for a serpentine belt though.
Again, the code would help, and the mileage on your 96.
r/ -IanCT

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99.0+% of the time a bad DPFE sensor is associated with code P0401..insufficient EGR flow, or code P0402..excessive EGR flow. Normally, you will not notice any difference with code P0401, but with code P0402, the engine runs jerky/crappy, as if it was starving for power.

pull
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Read your Haynes manual, disconnect the battery terminals, after you reconnect them, drive the car for about 20 minutes on a mixed city/highway stretch. You PCM/computer will relearn your driving style. That is all it takes. At any rate you should disconnect the battery before you replace the DPFE sensor.

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V.B. Mercon opined in

That's what I was thinking.....

Huh? Why?
I mean it's always a good idea if you're going to do extensive underhood work... but say I was JUST going to replace the DPFE ..is there some weird connection between EGR system and airbags now?
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Each and every electronic device has its own electronic signature, even if they were made side by side on the same assembly line.The PCM uses that signature to establish a reference base value. By disconnecting the battery, you are dumping that old/bad DPFE signature from the PCM. When a new DPFE is installed, the PCM will use that new signature to establish the new reference base value, as it relearns. Lucky for us that this is all that is required, and it does not need a bunch of sophisticated equipment, because the DPFE sensor has a high rate of failure in the Taurus with the 3.0V6 vulcan engine.

city/highway
it
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Steven wrote:

No. 2 the reprograming of the PCM is simply resetting the computer which you can do by disconnecting the battery and then attaching it back and it reprograms itself as is releans the engine and will tell you what trouble codes you have.... what trouble code did you have from the dealer??? is it code P0401???? if so you might want to go to www.contour.org and do a search on that code there is also a procedure that you take off the throttle body and remove the carbon deposits behind the throttle body and clean it out to allow the passages of egr gases to be burned off and the code will go away.. the serpentine belt did not cause this, so probably just needs to replace anyway.... also if you have a list of 7 things that they want to do.. try one at at time and your Check engine light will probably go out before you replace all the things... one at a time and clear the codes by disconnecting the battery and the codes will come back on after a two cycle drive if the problem is not solved... (it takes two short trips in the car to have the trouble code come back on).....go for the hoses if they are leaking, the the fuel filter, the cheap stuff first... one at a time and save the $750 dealer bill, probably worth about 1/2 of what a regular shop would charge you....
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Steven,
When the dealer reprograms the processor the processor will be reset as the previous writer stated however the WDS (scan tool) will check for any updated calibrations. If ford has updated the calibration from the one that is in your vehicle it will reflash the rom.
Sometimes a reflash (reprogram) will cure the problem but typically engine lamps coming on (mil) are the result of a defective part. The Taurus model as well as some other fords have a high replacement rate of PFE/DPFE sensors. The function of this sensor is to measure the back pressure in the exhaust and send this info to the processor. This information is used to determine egr opening as well as other controlling other output components.
To replace the sensor is actually quite simple. If memory serves the Taurus sensor is connected by two hoses and one electrical connector without any screws. One hose is larger then the other so you can't mix them up.
If you do decide to disconnect the battery be sure to warm the car to operating temperature first. When you restart it you want it to adapt to a warm engine first. it may run a little different until it adapts.
hope this helps,
John

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Reprogramming the PCM is not "resetting" or any thing else all of you have been stating. Reprogramming the PCM is just what the name implies. Installing a NEW program replacing the old. There are a number of reasons for this. Maybe the revised program is designed to fix the constant DPFE codes for one.

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It's semantics

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decide
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which
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would
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I don't think so, read the posts. Yours included, it's just plain wrong.

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the
that
Thanks for all replies...
Here's the action plan...
1. Warm engine... then disconnect battery. Let engine cool. 2. Replace the DPFE. 3. Clean the MAF (With great care for the little wires - I heard Windex does the trick) 4. Replace the PCV 5. Restart car.
If things go well and I'm feeling cocky, I'll tackle the rest of the list.
The mileage is 55,228 and the code pulled is gone, the service manager said their machine pinpointed the DPFE.
What do guys you recommend for an OBD-II scanner and where to get same?
Thanks again, Steve
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Go to www.google.com and type in "OBDII CODE READER" in the search window. Google will return many links, Low to Very high priced. Pick your choice according to your wallet..! You can buy it online or go to a local store if one is near-by.

does
said
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I don't think you want to use Windex, as it will leave a residue. You'll want to use an electronics cleaner spray/aerosol which will clean the filiment and the spray liquid dissipates, no residue or filmy substance.
I have the AutoScan OBDII reader I bought from Kragen, around $250 or so. Pulls the code, and it gives you the definition for that specific code. Supports American and Asian vehicles by mfgr, and up to the year 01, but you can use it on newer cars, it just might not have updated code info or powertrain info on the newer year. Of course any scanner you buy now should be current up to this year.

does
said
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Steven opined in

A Those wires are NOT as fragile as all that. Ask any electrical component engineer.
2. DO NOT use a Q tip, DO NOT use windex
Both of them will work but cheap q tips snag and leave fibers and Windex leaves a film which will attract dirt faster. Ever use it on your windshield?
Use rubbing alcohol Or spray contact or tuner cleaner..and a soft toothbrush or a small poly bristle paintbrush just GENTLY.
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