Why aren't these standard equipment by now?

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wrote:


My '83 Peugeot 505 STX had an oil level sensor. Before you started the car up, the oil temp. gauge showed the oil level (just like the fuel gauge shows the level of fuel).
Jeff
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wrote:

Both of my old Aerostars and my 88 New Yorker had low oil level warning lights. So did all Toyota Previas. I know a lot of others did too. No gauge - just a light that lit if the level was low on startup.
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We wouldn't need most of your fine suggestions if people would just take a break from trying to be stupid.....
1 Over-engineering coolers adds needless waste.... purchase prices will be driven high in a marketplace where low cost is the over-riding decision maker.
2 If you need a magnetic filter, is is probably too late for a magnetic filter. Once we experience ferrous metal wear, the die is already cat.
3 Bypass oil filters were the norm in the 40s and 50s. Full flow filtration systems using good quality filters are all that is required. When flowing, bypass filters rob oil flow from the lubrication system. We have no way of knowing when they do stop flowing. Nothing will replace timely oil changes.
4 Over-engineering adds needless waste. My SuperCrew has a factory oil filter.... yet the hottest days in my year barely reach 80F.
5 The 5R110 TorqueShift features an external spin on filter. However, I still remove the oil pan to see what there is to see. There's a magnet in there and if it is clinging on to ferrous materials.....
6 Yep... lets add places for insulating road debris to cling to. It's always a good idea to add cooling devices that require airflow... especially in areaas that don't get any airflow.
7 Many vehicles offer service reminders. How this will save crude oil is beyond me.
8 A warning light? The bulb on the end of my dipstick has never malfunctioned. Besides, if the oil level is low and is never topped off, aren't we saving crude oil?
9 Better than an elecric cooling fan.... how about we incorporate a fan on to the alternator shaft? Dang... they already did that....
10 Ahhhh.... yes, more foglights so those bozos can blind us old geezers in town... Oh, how I love those fog lights.... I love 'em so much that they occasionally bring tears to my eyes.
11 Yes.. I like it... purple lights flashing out "I'm an idiot" so we can avoid them.... don't forget to turn yours on.
12 Hmmmm.... I thought checking tire pressures at the time of service included the spare. Mind you, if we trade the donut in for a full size, full cost spare, we could always kick the kids out of the back seat so we can retain trunk space. The old VW Beetle had a real nifty low spare tire warning pressure gauge... the windshield washers would quit working...
13 I'd like to see a low tire pressure warning sysem that actually worked, didn't cost a gazillion bux to fox after the kid at the tire store screwed up the transponder, and didn't require someone to actually try and figure out what "warning... low tire" meant on the message center.
14 this would eliminate 90% of the drivers on the road. Driving is a privilege, not a right. There are vat numbers of people that aren't good with machinery.... and a car is just another piece of machinery...
15 Most mirrors do fold out of the way.... however, as a motorist, it behooves me to use my God-given senses to stay out of ttrouble. Those times when I turn int a pedestrian or cyclist, I should also use my God-given senses to stay out of harms way... Quit staring at your navel... it's impolite.
16 Yes.... about 2 or 3 tons of armour should about do it..... especially since this will save crude oil stocks.
17 Most everything I work on has sway bars front and back.... don't know what you're looking at.
18 I like this one..... for most instances the roof should be sufficient roll-over protection.... well aside from the fact that we should drive with idea that the roof should remain pointing up. However, we could add a 12 point cage to the "under-armour" ... the added weight should preseve crude oil stocks for years to come.
19 None of Fords new vehicles feature drum brakes as anything other than parking brakes. Drum brakes worked well for many. many years.... right up until they invented idiots.
20 and 21 I'll have some of what you're smoking.
We will not see any reduction in traffic accidents untl people start treating motor vehicle operation with the respect it deserves.... We oooh and ahhh over aerobatic teams and such concentrating on each manoeuver... then we climb on to the freeway talking on the cell phone enjoying our beverages and snacks, ready stuff, lost in our tunes and paying more attention to the kids in the back seat (providing we didn't put the spare there) than to our driving.... all the while, instead of working with the other fliers in our formation, we are pissed at them because they are all idiots... especially the ones that are obeying the laws.
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On 15 Apr 2005 23:22:07 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Cost and weight (important for CAFE)

Cost
Cost and weight (again, CAFE)

See above

See above, plus the manufacturers are trying to REDUCE maintenance.

See above - plus in many situations the fins would pack up with dirt. (many cars already have lightly finned cast aluminum sumps)

Many vehicles already have this - but it is a cost issue.

Cost and weight

Real fog lights? Anything less is a waste - and NONE of the current crop of OEM fog lights is worth their weight. Again, weight and cost ( and liability issues -)

That's all we need - more distractions to ignore.

Full size spares dissapeared for a reason - CAFE and cargo space. As for the monitors, see cost above.

This is coming - just an expese issue on lower end cars.

I'd pay extra for real gauges.

Doubtful. Many who know enough to pass the test are just too lazy and too cheap to maintain their vehicles the way they KNOW they should.

So, you make them automatic, so you can NOT drive away with them folded, and they pop out and hit somebody when you start the car. Almost all north american sold vehicles already have safety breakaway mirrors - most of which CAN be folded.

Lots of reasons for this. Weight being number one, cost a close second, and serviceability not far behind. Add to that the FACT that this underpan would hold dirt and cause corrosion - OBVIOUS you are not a mechanic. Also obvious you are not in the "salt belt"
I've driven vehicles with skid pans - and they are a TOTAL PAIN to maintain. Also, cooling issues can be caused if the skid pan is not very well designed.

Why? For average town driving, many vehicles do NOT need sway bars - at least not on both ends. Just more weight and cost - and MOST cars today have them on at least one end.

Rollover protection is already mandated by north american law.

Again, why? not necessary. More costly. Not necessarilly better either - they DO have more mainenance issues

More expenseive and extra weight/complexity, as well as TOTALLY un-necessary in the majority of North America. Also a VERY serious energy issue - if every car in North America turned on a 750-1500 watt block heater every morning when everyone is also making coffee, making tost, frying eggs, and running the hair dryer/curling iron imagine the impact on the Hydro grid!!!!!!!!

See above.

You have anything to back tat up????

The average age of the North American fleet is well up there - a ten year old car is NOT an oddity any more. Can't remember the figures, but fleet average age is already well up in the teens.
Most Americans won't drive the same car longer than 5 years anyway - and many change every 2. Also, the automotive industry DRIVES the north american economy - and if cars lasted twice as long, a very large percentage of north american manufacturing (what little we have left) would close down. YOU might be one who loses your job.

Yes - but tell THAT to Mr / Mrs average american. They want it NOW, and they want it CHEAP. And they want something new and different next year to keep up with the "Joneses" Why else do companies like WalMart and Costco, to say nothing of Dollar Stores thrive in North America? You can hardly buy anything of decent quality any more because all manufacturing is being outsourced to China / Mexico / Korea etc for cost reasons.
Won't happen guy - not in YOUR lifetime!!!
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The Volkswagen Type I (Beetle) of the 1950's and 60's had undercarriages designed in such a way that they were "hermetically sealed". Because of the fact these cars outlasted every other car sold on the market when it came to body corrosion. Likewise owning a VW Beetle of that era and living in the salt belt of North America was a very wise choice.
When I mentioned "under armor" I was refering to what the old VW Beetles had more so than the "skid plates" found on many trucks and SUV's.
Most certainly sealing up the undercarriage can be done in such away that it is cost effective. #1 The car is safer because of all the safety items underneath that are protected. #2 The car will last longer - especially on the salt belt because critical components underneath can not rust away as they are "SEALED". and last but not least #3 The weight issue becomes a none-issue. Sealing up the undercarriage actually saves fuel because the vehicle becomes much more aerodynamic. A lot of air-drag is because of all the things underneath the vehicle that drag in the air when the vehicle is in motion rather than elsewhere.
For repairs done underneath the hermetically sealed undercarriage will have access panels that give access to all serviceable components underneath the vehicle. Everything will be air tight. So air tight in fact that the cars would even float the same way the old VW Beetles did when they were new.
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