Working with pulley bearing

I had the hi-pitched squeal when starting '94 TBird LX V8. Appears to be the idler-arm pulley bearing. A long time ago, Lugnut was good enough to render tips on bearing replacement. I'm way behind the time curve,
but ...
Bearing is marked NTN 6203LH
I looked the pulley/bearing over, decided I should be able to remove bearing. Juiced it both sides with liquid wrench, tapped, waited. Adjusted vise jaws just so, placed pulley and short length of 1.25 " dowel in center, and started hammering.
It wouldn't budge.
Should I wail on this thing? Should the bearing come out without fragmenting the dowel?
Thx, Puddin'
" ... and the bees made honey in the lion's head." - from "If I Had My Way", Blind Willie Johnson
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Its best to use a press but yes it will come out. Your best bet though is to just by the pulley, thy arent that expensive. If you do change it make sure to stake the new one in. ......Just buy the pulley......fyi :if it's wooden dowel, it will probably break first. Buy the pulley, they are a dime a dozen. Did I mention, buy the pulley?

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Sho'ly, sho'ly. Dime a dozen.

Maybe $30.
I got it out with the dowel, a vise, a propane torch, and a hammer.
If it's really advisable to buy the whole unit, I'll find out before it's over.
Thanks, anyway.
P

" ... and the bees made honey in the lion's head." - from "If I Had My Way", Blind Willie Johnson
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If you do manage to get the bearing off and the bracket is still in one piece, here's some advice to make the bearing reinstall a little less painless. Put the new bearing in the freezer overnight before you reinstall it. That way, it will have shrunk a bit and should go back in much easier with less force. This is ideal especially when working with wheel/hub bearings and in any case where you don't have a press to work with.
Good luck, Sharky
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Good advice, thanks.
There's a pretty good discussion of the subject at:
http://www.modularfords.com/forums/showthread.php?t2733
Anybody know where I can get a good replacement bearing?
Bearing - NTN 6203LH
NAPA can cross-ref a 6203 to a SKF bearing. I dunno it's the same. Doesn't look like Autozone or Advance has it.
Thx, P
" ... and the bees made honey in the lion's head." - from "If I Had My Way", Blind Willie Johnson
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 18:47:58 -0500, Puddin' Man

That'll work. Its exactly the same bearing... All the bearing manufacturers use the same numbering system for their bearings...
SteveL
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 18:46:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@not.a.real.address.com wrote:

Then what's the "LH"?
On front - NTN 6203LH On end of race - NTN6203EX4CSIS Made in Canada
P
" ... and the bees made honey in the lion's head." - from "If I Had My Way", Blind Willie Johnson
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 21:56:01 -0500, Puddin' Man

You really need to look it up in the catalog of the bearing maker to know for sure. WAY too many variables.
The 6203 covers the basic dimensions, the letters after it denote things like seal or shield type, lubricant type, speed ratings, temperature ratings, tolerance, etc. And they use different code letters.
You can use a slightly different variant if you know exactly what the changes will do to the finished product. If the bearing is inside a sealed enclosure you do not need a fully sealed bearing - one with a simple dust shield or open ends will work fine.
You can sometimes go up in precision level, but the costs jump so dramatically so you only do that in an emergency. High precision bearings like those used in a lathe tailstock can easily cost 10X the same bearing in a low precision variant.
--<< Bruce >>--
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wrote:

"Light contact rubber seal"
Here's more than anyone will ever need to know about NTN bearings: http://www.ntn.ca/pdf/A1000/A1000_Radial.pdf
SC Tom
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 21:56:01 -0500, Puddin' Man

Okay, the 6203 bearing has a 17mm bore, and a 40mm OD, the L stands for sealed, and I'm guessing the H stands for high speed lubricant. Most of what I deal with are motor bearings, and this one is popular with most manufacturers...
The second number is probably the identifier for the batch and who it was sold to...
You can sniff around on the Timken bearing site and get way more info than you can use...
SteveL
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