Monte Carlo Exhaust/Nova Scotia MVI

I'm in the process of preparing my car for its annual Nova Scotia safety inspection and when I was rolling around on the creeper underneath the car,
I noticed the joint is starting to split on the resonator and there is a gap about 2" long. This is obviously making the exhaust louder and will not pass inspection as is. But what I want to know is, is this resonator required to pass inspection, or should I be able to remove and replace it with a piece of straight pipe? I know it is there to tone down the note of the exhaust, but I don't think it's going to make a significant difference.
It's not that it is too expensive to replace, but it would surely make the replacement job much easier, and it will save me at least $50-$75. BTW, I live in Nova Scotia and I have checked the Motor Vehicle Registry website, but there is no specific information in regards to the exhaust system. You are required to have a catalytic converter, if the car was originally equipped with it. They are also making changes in that older vehicles will only be required to be inspected every two years, as opposed to every year. The downside is that they are going to be very strict with their inspections.
Any info on this would be appreciated. Thanks Sharky
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Sharky wrote:

In Texas a car must be original factory specs to pass inspection.
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I'm not an authority on Nova Scotia's vehicle code, but I'd assume that replacing the resonator with pipe would be ok as long as the maximum sound level isn't exceeded and emissions aren't adversely affected.
Dave
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Well, I called a muffler shop that my wife used to use for oil changes, and when I asked the tech about replacing the resonator with straight pipe, he said that it is possible and totally legal to do. But, because of the way the flange is designed (apparently it runs on a bit of an angle), he said there is a chance that using straight pipe may burn out the second O2 sensor, because it is so close to the flange. He thinks using a straight pipe may create just enough more heat that it will burn out the sensor. So I told him I would find a resonator and flange gasket and my wife would bring the parts when she dropped the car off. I don't want to risk burning out O2 sensors, at the cost of saving a few bucks.
Thanks for the replies. Sharky
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Sharky wrote:

Odd. IIRC, the 2nd O2 sensor is right after the cat, not the resonator. It measures the cat outlet temp.
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Yes, you are correct, it is right after the cat. But for some reason, the mechanic seemed to think putting a straight piece of pipe in there would create too much heat and take out the sensor. Yeah, he kind of confused me a bit too when he said this on the phone, but I told him I'd try to find a resonator instead. I really don't feel like having to replace O2 sensors down the road, which would cost more than the exhaust repair itself.
Sharky
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