Long-term storage of a Honda

I may be staying overseas for upto 6 months and I wonder how to leave my car so I can use it again without any lasting damage. I know as much to leave it on some blocks to prevent tire damage but what else?

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september.org:

Reposting of the answer I gave to an identical question back on the 14th of this month (but for a 2010 Honda):
The trickle-charger is an excellent idea. That way you don't need to disconnect the battery.
Adding Sta-Bil to the gas is an imperative these days, so you MUST use it. And use it according to the label on the bottle. Do not add more than specified because you think "more" must be "better".
Other things you need to do: 1) Change the engine oil. 2) Pump-up the tires to the maximum shown on the sidewall. This will minimize flat-spotting. 3) Make sure the gas tank is completely full. 4) After changing the oil and adding Sta-Bil, take the car for a half-hour drive, preferably with some highway involved. This gets the engine good and hot, plus it helps distribute the Sta-Bil throughout the gas in the tank, and helps make sure Sta-Bil ends up in the fuel lines and the injectors. 5) Park the car, shut it off for good, and do not drive it any more.
Given that you're working with a car this new, there should be no need to raise the tires off the ground unless you've noticed a slow leak in any of the tires. If you suspect the tires may go flat during your absence, place jack stands under the control arms, NOT under the rocker panels or subframe rails. You need the suspension to stay under normal compression while the car is idle.
--
Tegger

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On 09/23/2010 04:44 PM, Tegger wrote:

but not any trickle charger - the old ones will soon dehydrate the battery. it needs to be the modern "intelligent" type that knows when the battery is charged, then reduces current accordingly. the better modern ones have a "desulfate" mode which will not only keep charged but also condition the battery during storage.

if not done recently with a quality product, i would suggest changing the antifreeze. use a modern long-life product, and dilute only with distilled, or deionized water. do NOT dilute with tap or softened water - it introduces chemicals that can increase or start corrosion.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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<snip> >>

Don't use deionized water. It will accellerate corrosion. This is a major problem in live steam model railroading, where some noobs think that "if distilled water is good, deionized water is gooder"
But yes, distilled water. Actually, always distilled water if you have to cut your antifreeze. The less crap (minerals) you put into your system the less that will find a permanent home.
--

- dillon I am not invalid

Toby (Tri-Umph That's the Sweet Truth)
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On 09/28/2010 06:34 AM, Dillon Pyron wrote:

you seem to be confusing "deionized" with "softened". softened water will indeed accelerate corrosion. deionized will not because - amazingly - the ions that cause the electrolytic corrosion process have been removed.
http://www.eetcorp.com/antifreeze/antifreeze-faq.htm#q20

distilled or deionized.

correct. but don't confuse deionized and softened.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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Thanks, Tegger, and sorry for missing the original post. What Subject was it under? Anyway, I'm glad you wrote that the car can be left on fully inflated tires and I'm glad I read about Sta-Bil for the first time right here from you. In my case the only problem is the oil change that I just can't do at home. As to the trickle charger, do you or Jim have any suggestion as to the brand?
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Oops! I just realized I've sent my reply from a different server that still has my old user ID "Dabbler." My bad ...
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I have two automatic chargers. Both are 12 amp. You can usually return a charger to an auto parts store if it does not shut off when charging is complete or turn back on in a few minutes to pulse a tiny bit more energy into the battery.
Again, The size of the charger is not important. The automatic sensing circuitry will make all the difference in the world for the health of your battery.
Michael
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On 09/23/2010 11:08 PM, Dabbler wrote:

google for "battery tender" and you'll get suggestions. it's the ones that "maintain" offer the ability to keep connected long term.
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Tegger, the trickle charger could actually turn out to be a bad thing. Many are made with no automatic shutoff when maximum charge is reached. I left one such trickle charger on a ford one winter. The battery was ruined and dried out when spring arrived. Even a single amp of charge over months of charging will ruin a battery. Any battery charger with an automatic shutoff will work for him. I know. I have used one since the trickle charger incident. It is a 12 amp automatic charger. It keeps the battery good all winter. If you go out in the garage and look at it, you will see no charge going on. If you wait long enough, you will see the meter snap up and right back down. It is maintaining the charge without overcharging.
Michael

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Your description is better than mine. Any charger left attached for long periods /definitely must/ have a reliable shutoff. All it needs to do is return the battery to its fully-charged state, then stop until needed again.
Modern cars have large parasitic draws, and their batteries will go flat in about two weeks without regular top-up, so the charger is necessary if the battery is not to be disconnected.
Leaving the battery connected preserves the radio anti-theft codes, the engine idle-learn, and the transmission's grade-logic, so that's better than disconnecting it.
--
Tegger

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wrote:

I have had a trickle charger from this outfit maintaining the battery on my "Hurricane" generator for the past 10 years. Same battery, same charger. Unit has never failed to start, though genertor is rarely used rarely. Last started last month when the last storm threatened. Yes, I use stabil and change oil, etc. http://batterytender.com/automotive/battery-tender-plus-12v-at-1-25a.html
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