Make it easier to get safety features.

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wrote:

Thank you! I looked at one on the lot Saturday and that was the immediate impression I got.
Don't they have anyone to help with their styling? +-----------------------------------------+ | Charles Lasitter | Mailing/Shipping | | 401/728-1987 | 14 Cooke St | | cl+at+ncdm+dot+com | Pawtucket RI 02860 | +-----------------------------------------+
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 20:01:28 -0400, Charles Lasitter

I'm happy with my ABS, wish I didn't have to shell out for air bags, and not entirely convinced on some of the other hifalutin features.
Marketing-wise, it's hard for a manufacturer to put safety features on just the high-zoot models, so they put them on only the high-zoot marques instead. Until stuff gets really cheap like ABS has.
I'd also like back the $50 or so it costs me for the cruise control, which I've never used and probably never will, and really, who does?
J.
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wrote:

All the time. In the UK.
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JXStern wrote:

I do, a lot, I have trouble keeping my speed down on certain roads, e.g., Palisades Interstate Parkway, so I engage cruise control at a speed low enough to skate by the troopers whenever possible.
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It's something that has been happening for an age and I suspect it will continue to do so.
Thinking back to the introduction of ABS into "ordinary" cars in the UK, it was for a long time reserved for the luxury or sporty ends of the specification scale. It took a long time (five years) for it to be standard across most Contour / Accord / Mondeo sized cars, some manufacturers adopted it before others of course.
It wasn't quite the same with airbags, these literally arrived overnight in 1993 / 1994.
I don't believe it'll change. Such "value added" features are great margin improvements. You don't think it actually costs 60% more to build the sporty model compared to the base one do you? <g>
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 20:01:28 -0400, Charles Lasitter

ive had this in a van for the last 5 months. Might be ust chrysler's system, but it doesn't work too well for me, still get a loud tyre squeal if I floor it to merge traffic. Nowadays I just turn it off when I start the car.

i HATE this. Teach proper braking practice, not compensate for driver inadequacy. i remember a few news stories from the UK a few years back, where these kicked in uneqpectedly. guy tapped hi brakes because he saw a speed camera ahead, just to chek his speed (as we all do) and the thing did an emergency stop, causing a 3 car accident (car was turning at the time). There were another case or two as well. Until the car can sense the situation around it (not easy or praticable) it should NOT have overriding command of motive systems. Thats just plain common sense.

see your headlight switch - wire the first stop, so it'll also be triggered by the ignition. if key's at II, lights are on - much better than that stupid way saturn has of working off the handbrake - friend's vue has its DRL going off every time he stops 9its a manual, and he is n a hilly area, and drives properly, with handbrakes at lights etc) volvo did it right years ago. if you use your regular lights for daytime running, you don't need all the lights and reflectors etc. just run from the ignition.

i wouldn't. I've not even a big ABS fan. i guess the problems is that mostly these featurse are not set up as 'emergency' but as 'cautionary'. So they're on be default, and set to activate much too soon. Of course, there are SOMe safety features I'd love to see introduced into the UK thats been standard elsewhere for years. REAR fog lights, for instance. Oh, and seperation of brake and turning signals. removal of turning signals from being buried in with headlights (see certain neons, and current crown-vics for instance.
Don't get me wrong, I'm no luddite 9in fact, quite the opopsite) but i do know where technology should not be substituted for driver shortcommings. instead of whacking more tech on, hold the drivers to a higher standard.

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wrote:

Some systems are designed to prevent oversteer in corners, but nothing can overcome the basic laws of phsyics. For the system to work you have to skid a little, that's how it spots you're skidding. Some tyres make a louder racket than others.

The system is not triggered if you "tap the brakes." If you aggressively punch the pedal then it triggers, but as soon as you lift off, it lets go too. It uses a certain element of logic too, working on what your other controls are doing, what they've just been doing, how much force and how hard you push the pedal, so on and so forth.
Tapping the brake pedal doesn't trigger it. You have to jack on the anchors with lots of force.
Actually if the guy was an idiot and was hammering along then punched the pedal, he caused the crash in conjunction with the other chuffs behind.

It doesn't. It augments what the driver does.
I've played with all sorts of electronic systems. Some can be fooled pretty easily. Accelerate hard then brake firmly and the Mercedes EBA is triggered. Tapping the brakes doesn't trigger it.

One problem with this solution is power consumption, which in turn is linked to fuel consumption. Running 110 watts of bulb uses up more than running 24 watts of bulb and does make an appreciable difference to motion lotion. Thanks to the wonders of carbon credits, every part mile per gallon is starting to count.
And the other issue of wearing out the wretched things. How many Volvos do you see with one headlight working?

I agree, but I suspect we both know it's not going to be possible to achieve this.
As for ABS, two sides of the coin. On the one hand, yeah it keeps you pointing in the right direction when you stand on the brakes. On the other, there are idiots that believe it shortens their stopping distance and thus tailgate and drive too fast.
Way too many British people don't have the foggiest on how to use high visibility lights (front fog, rear fog lamps). Some idiots put *everything* on either to look cool or at the merest hint of rain. Other chumps keep everything off until it's dark...
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wrote:

thats the point. it was a system fault. Wouldn't, couldn't happen with standard brakes, can with the EBA stuff. THATS the point.

read what you just said. It augments. how does it know it needs augmenting. can it see why you're slowing? no, it can't. Right below this you yourself say how you can fool these systems. If they can be triggered into reacting inappropriately, why would you call that a safety system.
We have a driver, a control system that samples the data all arond the vehicle 9or is supposed to) and makes edcisions based on whats going on around the vehicular unit. Is the car dong the same? if not, how can it tell if the braking force needs 'augmenting'. Friend of mine was involved with the Darpa grand challenge. one of the problems they faced was braking - getting the braking force suitable for the enviroment. it all depends on how far you have to stop, if you intend to stop or just slow down, is avoidance needed, what surface you're on, how you're loaded. no car on the market can tell any of that. It could tell the mass you're carrying, but is that load in the back a wardrobe, or half a tank of tropical fish, or 10 8ft sheets of plastic. Are you stoping because there's a child just run out, you've just spotted a cop with a radar gun, or the lights you were hoping to make just turned red. Is it rainy, there snow, or sand on the road. If it can't tell, how can it adapt. I could be braking, be just shy of the braking limit for the conditions, but EBA thinks I meant to break harder, so it presses harder, oops lockup, now thats the ABS kicking in, thats longer stopping, less control, all for a system that think sit knows better.
Dangerous? I should cocoa.

not when its working 100%. If you've lpayed with electronic systems, you shoud know they're some of the most tempramental and fragile things out there. They're also good at going wrong and giving no hint of it until its too late.

Great, you assume the headlight bulbs are the ones used. not so, I said the firststop. in the Us, thats the orange 'running lights', as you should know the volvos in the UK used those small 11W sidelights. dipped beam is the 55W elements, which are the second stop on the headlight rocker. As a brit, i'm sure you appreciate the difference between them - turn your lights on, turn the ignition off, and take your keys out - should just be your sidelights that are left on.

nope, doesn't keep you opointing in any direction. it just increases the chance that you will be able to steer. in many cases, ABS won't stop you sliding at all. in some, it'll actualy make you spin.

again, as I said, don't use technology to compensate for stupidity. The only way to beat that is education.
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wrote:

EBA doesn't do it. Period. It would not be allowed to be used if it caused accidents like this.
Imagine the law suits?

You're suggesting that we shouldn't bother with power assisted steering and servo-assisted brakes. These also augment the driver control input in *exactly* the same way.

No, they're not acting inappropriately. They're doing what they're designed. But they are unable to bend the laws of phsyics. If I barrel into Silverstone's Maggots at 95 mph, brake hard as the road drops, the back end will waggle. It'll usually break away. The stability protection is of limited use when the rear wheels are not in proper contact with the tarmac.

That's where the fuzzy logic is involved. It's 2FC/2, i.e., very clever stuff. But it works from what the driver does. See my other comment about power assisted steering.

No.
In isolation it doesn't work this way *unless* you're on a racing circuit and you know exactly how much pressure to apply and when, thus you can thump the pedal to achieve maximum retardation and you do it very quickly.
On the road, only fools thump the brake pedal without wishing to stop in a hurry. It knows the difference between quick and firm rolling on the pressure and a sudden thump. That's what the system spots. Most fools quickly learn that if they thump the pedal of a car with EBA it stops quicker than they *first* anticipated.
The first time one drives a new car, we learn stuff about it. Say it has a quicker steering rack. We may oversteer the first one or two corners. Then we learn. It's precisely the same with *any* situation.
First time I triggered the ABS in our Ka was a learning experience. Second time I knew what to expect.

Herein is precisely why the driver in the circumstances needs to be educated or at least try it.
As for the stopping distance and control argument, stopping distances are slightly longer with the ABS humming away than a skilled driver without ABS in ideal circumstances. I don't know of any driver than can hold a car at the point just before lock up in an emergency situation such as the ones you've described.

No more so than servo assisted brakes. Nothing an experiment can't get over. I don't understand your concerns. It is as though you don't want to learn about these new fangled power brakes and what not...

No manufacturer allows a system such as this that doesn't work to go on production machines.

EBA fails safe. It deactivates. That and a whole bunch of warning lights.

Ermmmm they are on the Volvo S60...

Nope.
Ooooh I live in the UK, yeah, but being British...? That's something else.

In the absence of steering input, ABS keeps you pointing in the right direction because no locked wheel or prolonged change in braking effort from one or more tyres causes a yaw action.
www.dervman.com/ttwg.htm

Only if the driver cannot control the car. And that's why we have so many stability control applications out there...

Agreed. Except even the stupid get driving licences.
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