Proper oil level checking

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On Sep 10, 11:24 am, Brian Smith


The owner's manual's counsel is fine.
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Elle wrote:

    It's good of you to edit my entire response to your question.
    As far as the Owners Manual goes, it is fine, but it does not hurt to excel at anything one undertakes in life.
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On Sep 10, 12:31 pm, Brian Smith wrote:

It was a concise way to point out you do not follow your own advice. ;-)
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Elle wrote:

    If you were paying attention I said it was a tractor that I used in the example, not a small vehicle. It is a legal requirement that commercial vehicles have a Pre-Trip Inspection and Post-Trip Inspection performed on them every day. Are you up to speed now, or do you require the service of a tow truck?
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Look back to the post where you first responded to my posts. No tractor, just lousy advice.
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Elle wrote:

    You're obviously having a blonde moment.
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Hey, I thought this was an Accord group. Does Honda make an Accord tractor now?
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It makes eminent sense though I'm fairly confident that such an overnight loss of oil would be noticed in the garage by the pudle it caused. Of course, it might be a different story if the vehicle was parked outside.
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Cameo wrote:

    In the example I used, the tractor is parked outside in the yard.
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wrote:

What if the manufacturer designed the lines on the dipstick for readings with the engine warm and shut off for a few minutes? Given how the owner's manuals speak of checking the level at every fillup, it makes sense that the dipstick lines would be so designed.
If that was the case, it would be impossible to get the correct level after an oil change 'cos it goes in cold and straight to the bottom.
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Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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Keith W wrote:

wha??? like it says in the owner's manual you mean???

wow!!!
indeed.
this is an unbelievably retarded thread. just read the freakin' manual - something that seems incredibly hard for some people to do. but because i'm an anal pedant, i'll quote exactly what it says in mine:
"engine oil and filter
checking
check the engine oil a couple of minutes after shutting the engine off, with the car parked on level ground. remove the dipstick and wipe it clean. re-insert it all the way down, then pull it out and read the level. the level should be between the upper and lower marks."
nothing about "waiting for all the oil to run down" [ha ha freakin' ha] or "thermal expansion" or even "keep it at the top mark".
so, next time you're in the gas station, after you've filled up, take advantage of the fact that you're on level ground and have been standing with the engine off for a couple of minutes, and the free wipes, to check the freakin' oil. even a retard can do it.
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wrote:

I suggest you test that method out first. As I said in an earlier post, after my CRV had been standing for over 15 minutes after only a short run of the engine, the reading was midway between min and max. Checked cold the next morning, before running, the level was a shade above max. I don't care what the handbook says, that is my personal experience and, had I topped up when getting the first reading, the vehicle would have been overfilled. Try it yourself and see.
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Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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Keith W wrote:

1. i have - there's no significant change.
2. honda know more than you. thus if it says "check the engine oil a couple of minutes after shutting the engine off, with the car parked on level ground", that /doesn't/ mean "second-guess with a head full of superstitious bullshit".
read the owner's manual keith. it was written for people just like you.
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wrote:

I can only repeat (and rely) on personal experience built up over 50 years of owning and servicing my own vehicles. I accept what you say but I don't necessarily have to follow or agree with it. It works for me and that is my main concern. The only other point that I would add is that the vehicle had been serviced by Trident Honda in Ottershaw only a week or so previous to my check and they would have put in the correct amount of oil. Whilst the oil showed a level midway between min and max after stopping the engine and standing for the aforementioned three to four minutes (actually it was nearer fifteen), it showed smack on max the next morning. You may call it superstitious bullshit but it would have resulted in overfilling had I followed it.
--
Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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Keith W wrote:

it's not "overfilling"!!!! dude, please try to understand, any reading that is /not/ taken per the owners manual is not correct. there's a massive difference in oil level between the correct and incorrect way to read a detroit auto transmission level, but you wouldn't try to are that they're both right would you?
this is why the manufacturer spends the time and money providing you with a manual. if you didn't need it because all your 1950 superstitions were relevant, it wouldn't be necessary!
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jim beam wrote:

correction: "argue"

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wrote:

I am not arguing either way. Simply saying that I will use the method I have always used. I see what you are saying about the manual but I still come back to the fact that the oil only reaches the full mark when it has stood for a long time. The undeniable fact is that I only got that reading by leaving it. I think we will have to agree to disagree on this one because my own experience of my Honda makes me regard the manual, however expertly written and well meant, as questionable on this point. Curiously, the manual for our other car, a Peugeot 406, advises checking the oil before the car is started and warns that checking when the car has recently been used will give inaccurate readings.
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On 09/12/2009 11:23 AM, Keith W wrote:

dude, that's not "full". that's "been standing a long time". "full" is when it's at the top mark a couple of minutes after switch off. like it says in the book.

so how do you dip the transmission on a detroit vehicle? what reading do you "believe"?

that's because /that/ vehicles system is calibrated that way - the honda is not!!! that's why you need to do it the way it says in the book!!!
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wrote:

Then why have a Max marking when the level is supposed to go above that later on? Surely that is a nearly Max mark, which makes no sense at all.

I haven't the foggiest idea what a Detroit vehicle is. I assume you are referring to automatic transmission which is rare over here as we mainly use manual gearboxes. You check the oil in those by crawling underneath the vehicle and squirting oil into the filler hole (which is in the side of the box) until it starts to run out. Simple but your back aches afterwards.

Which leaves the question of why, when it had only a few days before been serviced by a reputable Honda agent, does it reach the Max mark only after standing for a longer time. By that reckoning it should be above the mark by then.
To be honest, I don't think, from what we have discussed, that it makes that much difference. Next time I am at the agents I will quiz them on it.
I am not trying to be bloody minded. I am, more than anything, puzzled why Honda should be different to every other car I have owned. I have also seen the problems that can be caused by over filling, something to be avoided like the plague.
Keith
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On 09/13/2009 04:03 AM, Keith W wrote:

it makes sense if you read the manual!!! the whole point of measuring /anything/ is that you're able to do so in a way that is not only accurate, but consistent. you don't use a rubber tape measure for this reason. you get much more consistency measuring oil level at full working temp, on level ground, a couple of minutes after shutdown - just like it says in the honda book! all other readings, as you have proven, are arbitrary and INCONSISTENT.

jeepers. logic. get some..
the point is, detroit transmissions typically require dipping with the pump working. if you dip with the engine off, the level is /way/ above the mark. you have to dip according to instructions to get it right!

eh?
have you ever considered the possibility that it's because they actually know what they're doing???

like avoiding the owners manual like the plague?
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