190E 2.3 vs. 2.6

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Is there a noticeable difference between these two engines as far as power, performance, smoothness, reliability, etc etc. . Is it worth holding out for
a 2.6 over the 2.3? Just curious...
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2.6 is more silky but thats about it! No real noticable differences besides this! Driving these W201s' are a lot different than your Porsche 944, as they are not high performance machines and are not tuned as so,so just about anything you test drive on this level will never measure up unless you find a W201 EVO then you are up for a for a ride that will make you salivate!Oh yeah!!!!!!!!!
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2.6 is an in-line six and hence smoother. Its also more powerful. Both should be cheap nowadays

power,
for
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The 2.6 is a little more difficult to work on. The six is longer and is shoe-horned into the 201 chassis. For example replacement of the belt tensioner requires removal of the radiator. Peter

power,
for
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The w201 is a small car, a 2.3 is more than adequate enough for it. It's even quite good in a w124 with manual transmission. My brother had a w124 5spd with a 2.6 and it would drive over 120mph up mountain highways here in BC. In a w201 it would be a rocket, as a friend said who owned one. Keep your Porsche for the fast driving and get a sensible benz for your everyday commuting, better to wait out for one in good condition. Better to pay upfront for something exceptional than attempting to fix up a beater.
cp
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Why not go for the 190-2.5 16v. Lumpy idle but fast. Reliable if it's been looked after. Should be good for over 140mph and power slides.

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The guy's got a Porsche :-)
I wouldn't mind one if I lived in Europe, there's quite a bit of them there.
http://tinyurl.com/c5tkm
Though 140mph is not fast enough for me, I've driven faster in diesels :-) . No use for a car like that in the US unless you live near a raceway or are not afraid of being arrested :\
What was the last year of the 16v? My father or myself might go to Europe later in the summer, always brings some cars back, a 16v would be more interesting than a diesel westfalia like last time :)
Is there an interested in these cars on this continent? Would an American be allowed to buy one from Europe? hmmm could make it an ebay business...
cp
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Damn,what kind of diesel do you drive,a Mercedes Benz C-111/III ? 140 mph plus in a diesel does not sound safe and all that racket,sheeezzz!
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Most any modern high end German diesel will go 140mph. Some are considerably faster. I think the top-spec MB S-class, BMW 7 and Audi A8 diesels are all limited to 155mph. Unlimited, maybe 160? The VW Pheaton with the 330hp V10 would probably go 175mph without the limiter. Heck, even a top spec VW Golf TDI will go 145mph or so. Of course, the only one of the above that is sold in the US is the MB E320(?), that is still good for 140+, even in US spec.
I owned a US-spec 2002 VW Golf TDI, 90hp version. It would go an indicated 115mph all day long, and dead quiet too. Top spec in Europe in the same car is now 185hp I believe.
Kevin Rhodes Westbrook, Maine
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Sorry,but I'm not that diesel savvy! Do modern diesels use the power steering pump for the supply of vacumm for power brakes still?This is what I mean as far as unsafe.That would be a bad day indeed if power steering belt flew off at such great speeds and have to stop in a hurry.DOA!!!
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I don't recall any Merc's that used the PAS pump for vacuum. They either have a vacuum pump driven off the engine directly or they use the Sensotronic Braking System. (I only go back as far as W123's)

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Heck no, but my 300D has the same engine! :-) (or similar)

Modern diesels

:-))))
cp
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The last generation of 7 series BMWs had a diesel model which went almost 190mph. cp
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There's even an AMG Diesel, here from Juergen's site
http://www.mbspy.com/w203c30.htm
Also, SLK diesel
http://www.ultimatecarpage.com/frame.php?file r.php&carnum"42

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could any one tell me how to take off the cylinder head on a 2.3 190E 1985 step by step instructions please i have took the head bolts out and it still wont come off and the bolts to the alternator and thermostat housing off thank you
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cp wrote: [snip]

The short answer is yes but with conditions.
You are allowed to import the non-US compliant vehicles to the USA, BUT you cannot drive or register the vehicle yet. The registered importers ought to sort the paperwork on your behalf for ridiculous amount of money. The compliance process is not cheap, especially for vehicles never been imported to the USA, namely 190E 2,5-16 EVO.
1. If the vehicle is not on the NHTSA list of approved vehicles and their variants, you must petition for the approval to homologate your non-US compliant vehicle to meet the DOT and EPA regulations. 2. If the vehicle is approved, you must enlist the registered importer to release it from US Customs stranglehold, er, I mean, hold. 3. The registered importer must do all of compliance work in accordance to the FMVSS108 for the build year: the list is quite long. 4. In addition, the registered importer must certify that the motor and its ancillaries meet EPA pollution regulations for the build year. 5. You can always convert the vehicle back to its original ECE version once US Customs cleared the paperwork and once the vehicle is registered with the state DMV agency. Make sure the registered importer agreed to retain all of original components and turn them over to you.
OR
You can wait five more years for the exempt on 1985 model as NHTSA allows the vehicles 25-year-old or older to bypass the compulsory safety regulations, BUT EPA will say, 'not so fast'. You must certify that the vehicle meets the EPA regulation for the build year.
OR
You can push the Congress to repeal the silly laws that created NHTSA. Congress is looking into the issue whether NHTSA is serving the public safety or not. We need to demand that US become the signatory member of ECE international automotive safety regulations. NHTSA has been a tragic mistake since its creation in the late 1960s and has failed the public many times over.
Oliver
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hmmmmm I'm saving this, thanks!
It's so much simpler in Canada; you can import any car as long as it is 15 years old.
cp

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One way to do is to register the vehicle in Canada and make the annual visit to Canada to update the registration and numberplates. That is if you are Canadian or have Canadian residence. However, some states require you to register in their home state within 30 days. That might be a problem, especially in Colorado where the police is on look-out. I've never done this or heard of others venturing into that endeavour. However, I've seen lot of non-US compliant vehicles with US state numberplates, namely smart cars in California and Colorado. I had no success in prying the utmost secret from the owners on how they were able to obtain the American numberplates for their vehicles.
cp wrote:

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One shortcut is that Maine (VT too, I think) will accept a Canadian title to register a car newer than 15 years, and does not require a title at all for a car older than 15 years. Drive across the border, register in Maine, register in your home state. Not that I would erver have done such a thing for any of my Saab Club buddies, no sir, no way! :-)
Kevin Rhodes Westbrook, ME
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So? ;-) A 944 is nice, but a 190E 2.3-16 will outperform it (or at least hold its own), seat four (a little) more comfortably, look better (personal opinion), hold its value better, and be a less common sight on the street. Oh - and my idle is rock solid.

The 2.3-16 was inported to the US in '86 and '87. In Europe, the displacement was then raised to 2.5 liters and eventually the Evo and Evo II were produced as homologation specials, in production runs of 502 cars each. I believe '92 was the last year of production. None of the 2.5 liter 16-valve cars were ever officially imported to the US.

There is a thiving 16-valve community on the 'net. EPA and DOT make it extremely difficult to import any of the European spec 2.5-16s. The 2.5-16 wasn't much faster than the 2.3-16, so it's really not worth the trouble. If you got your hands on one of the Evos, that would be another story, but I know of no one who has managed to get one federalized for street use. There are a couple of them in the states, but they are not street legal and are only used on the track.
Bill Balmer 190E 2.3-16 first 16V in the US featured in Car & Driver , March 1986
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