Re: My Genesis is an electrical nightmare!



Brake lights are a VERY big safety issue and frankly, i wouldnt drive a car very far without them working properly. I think its time you got the Regional Hyundai Manager involved to get at least this one anomoly corrected ....or.....threaten to terminate the lease giving them one FINAL chance to either fix it or give you another leased vehicle. Its time you got real demanding at this point -- your safety and your families safety is in jeopardy. What are you going to do at this point ?
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I have a leased 2011 Sonata that also has electrical problems, although right now, the problem is limited to the driver's power window. But the problem is also intermittent, like yours, and the dealer can't duplicate it.
Call Hyundai at the 800 number on the webpage and open a complaint and get a case number. By law, you can ask to have the car replaced after several (in most states, four) unsuccessful attempts to provide warranty service. Tell the dealer that you are going to pursue your options under Florida's lemon law. Tell the dealer to call Hyundai's California office and ask them for help in solving the problem. DOCUMENT EVERYTHING.
Here's the link to information about Florida's lemon law: http://www.myfloridalegal.com/lemonlaw
Good luck.

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Car ( and I suspect Real Estate types) dealerships do seem to attract a certain personality dont they?. My local dealer is still p......d off I wont let him pour a $10 can of injector cleaner into the cars tank and charge a service fee of $80!.

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I was at my dealer's service department a few years ago. Talking to a woman in the waiting room, she said she really liked the car, but the upkeep was expensive and she'd not buy another. Turns out, she was following the dealers recommendations, not the owners manual.
I told her to read the manual and follow it. The dealer offered a "service menu" with prices. If I followed it, I'd have given him about $1000 a year for all the service checks, fuel injector service ($129), etc.
I avoid dealer service and the hard sell they give you. If it is a warranty issue, OK, for regular maintenance, no way.
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On Tue, 3 Jan 2012 20:12:36 -0500, "Charles"

Tough one. I'd keep good records of when the problem happened, when you went to the dealer, and circumstances that may be a factor, such as rain, high or low temperatures.
I'd escalate from the dealership to the regional office.
The dealer cannot fix something that is working when you go to him. After repeated instances though, he should be at least trying to find the problem and perhaps swapping out a few suspect parts until the problem goes away.
New cars are harder to trace than the older models. No longer does a switch turn of a light. Today, the switch sends a signal to a computer and asks the computer to turn the light on. The computer in turn addresses a relay that sends power to the light.
In the case of brake lights, I'd replace something, perhaps the switch activated by the pedal, just to try to minimize a safety risk. Since you don't see the lights when they come on, it is difficult to say how often it really happens. Maybe you can see the reflection of the middle light.
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Shame you're having problems.
Took my 2011 Sonata (which I love and have had _no_ problems with) for an oil change in today and was looking at the Genesis's.
Sweeeeeet lookin vehicle
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On Thu, 5 Jan 2012 19:21:30 -0500, "Charles"

Yes, it is very likely the cause. Considering all the problems, if I was the dealer, I'd replace it just to make a customer happy.
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Like somebody mentioned, Dealers wont replace anything that hasnt failed.On one of my V6 Sonatas all the plug leads failed, one after the other about 2 months apart from each other. Dealer preferred to strip off the inlet manifold each time a rear lead failed with all its hardware than replace all 3 rear leads that probably cost him a few 10,s of dollars. I did get a free CD though ( when I bought the car) extolling the excellence of factory service!!!!!!!!!!!!!.
wrote:

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On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 18:01:50 -0500, "Charles"

Good luck with the Lemon Law. I hope you got documentation every time you took your car back there. I know they never gave me anything when they had to swap out a radio 3 times to get the Blue Tooth to work. They just worked on it and never wrote anything up.
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On Wed, 18 Jan 2012 18:35:41 -0500, "Charles"

What makes the key special? Does it have security features?
My Sonata key can be cut by any key shop as it is a plain blank. I've heard of some keys costing up to $100 because of chips and stuff.
As for the service rep, you described about 95% of them. I never use the dealer for normal service.
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Unless the dealership is doing some shady stuff, this is not correct. The dealership is required by law in most states to keep all repair orders on file for a certain period of time. What is correct is that there's no set number of reports of a problem that makes it an actual problem.
What happens when you report a problem the dealership cannot duplicated will vary widely based on the circumstances of the issue as well as the dealership policy. Let's presume for a moment that the dealership believes you're having the issues you say you're having. If I were the technician there, here'd be my take on the problems: -- for the seat, I'd suspect the limit switch and request permission to replace it. -- for the audio head rebooting, I'd suspect the head unit. I'd first check connections at the rear of the head unit, and if okay, request permission to replace the head unit. -- for the bluetooth, I'd want to see the problem and do some investigating using your phone. Due to the number of potential issues, none of which is particularly more likely than the others, I wouldn't be likely to recommend an action unless I could at least duplicate the issue.
Some dealers won't grant permission to try the recommended repairs. This could be because of their own policies or because of Hyundai's lack of willingness to stand behind or authorize such attempts. And without duplicating the issue I can't prove anything is causing the problem. At my place of employment, I'd likely be given permission to replace the limit switch. Hard to say about the radio head unit as that's expensive. Management would likely want an authorization from Hyundai before trying that. They'd want some sort of guarantee Hyundai's not going to ask for a refund of the repair bill if the car is still not fixed. If the head unit were replaced, that would allow us to learn whether the bluetooth problem was with the head unit. If it's fixed, then your problem is gone. If not, the problem is with your phone, its compatibility, or its settings, as your phone and the radio head unit are the only items in the system necessary for a bluetooth connection.
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