Reg plate replacement

On 24/08/2014 22:51, alan_m wrote:


That's true, but would be spotted by a Traffic Warden walking past, or any other traffic official personnel on the walk.
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On 25/08/2014 00:59, johannes wrote:

I suspect that any new introduction of "official" plates, anywhere except in the poorer third world countries, would include some fancy technology. Maybe simply something like a RFID tag? Potentially something much more sophisticated.
--
Rod

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On 25/08/2014 08:17, polygonum wrote:

And what would happen in real life if you car didn't have a tag? I suspect nothing.
On a toll bridge the barrier may not raise and you may be trapped but on a normal road you would just drive past any sensor. The chances of the police stopping you as a result would be virtually nill - they would have too many false alarms to cope with.
It's much like the situation with uninsured drivers - is it a million+ taking the minute risk they they will not be caught?
--
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On 25/08/2014 11:16, alan_m wrote:

As ANPR gets better and more widespread, with links to the tax, insurance, and MOT databases any breach is going to be an "easy collar" for police in patrol cars. And our insurance premiums go down. "Can't read the numberplate" should be grounds for stop and check too.
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On 25/08/2014 12:28, newshound wrote:

once the new tax disc laws come in, the tax gets cancelled if the insurance runs out, I can see that catching a lot of people that pay their insurance by direct debit, miss a payment, insurance cancelled, tax cancelled and get stopped will be double whammy: insurance and tax.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:41:19 +0100, Mrcheerful wrote:

It's been illegal to have a taxed but uninsured car for three years already.
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On 25/08/2014 12:50, Adrian wrote:

But up to now if you bought a car with tax the tax could remain on it and appear that the car is road legal at least as far as tax goes. I agree that the illegality of no insurance is still the same.
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On 25/08/2014 00:59, johannes wrote:

The only role of a traffic warden is to raise revenue for the local council. They would just ticket the car irrespective of the plate being legal or not.
Despite dire warnings on the "Police Stop" type TV programs few councils will lift the car from the street and have impounded or scrapped.
--
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On 25/08/2014 11:08, alan_m wrote:

In one of the Police Programs, a police officer spotted a small difference in the three letter combination between front and rear plates, a middle E on one end became F on the other end. That's quite clever if I may say so. But then again this is for public consumption.
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On 25/08/2014 13:25, johannes wrote:

In the distant past I quite often picked up on vehicles with different plates front and rear, much less common now that v5 has to be produced.
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On 25/08/2014 14:42, Mrcheerful wrote:

I suppose it could have been detected by one of the plates not being consistent with colour and make; automatically detected by ANPR device in the police car. Hence police may nowadays rely more on machinery than on eyeball. Maybe one day we could even have driverless police cars.
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On 25/08/2014 18:04, johannes wrote:

if both numbers are referencing a similar vehicle it is unlikely to get picked up on the road, I usually found them at mot time, the reg number is usually taken at the front, the 'wrong' number plate was usually the front, because that is most likely to get damaged, then reg. number and vin do not match.
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On 25/08/2014 18:04, johannes wrote:

Probably only possible if there is a legal requirement to keep your number plate 100% perfectly clean at ALL times. It also assumes that plates don't degrade over a period of a few years - the surface could become degraded because of too much cleaning.
The biggest problem with matching the colour is that the front and rear plates are totally different colours in the UK.
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On 25/08/2014 18:43, alan_m wrote:

The worst offenders here are the plates mounted on some motorbikes to deliberately avoid speed cameras. My guess is that these bikes are immune to being chased by police as the offence doesn't warrent the significant risk.
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On 25/08/2014 19:02, johannes wrote:

The late motorcyclist who, a few days ago, overtook my wife at about a ton in a 50 limit, only to plough into a car making a right turn around the next bend, had one of these.
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2014 22:32:49 +0100, newshound

Sure thing. We believe you.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:42:36 +0100, Mrcheerful

I drove around for a couple/several years on a bike which had the wrong plate on it - it belonged to the next one the dealer had sold. Only when an astute copper queried it, did it come to light, but luckily the dealer was on the phone and could re-assure him of its legitimacy (also, I had the proper docs with me).
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On 26/08/2014 02:51, Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

The problem which both I and one of the kids has had is insurance companies entering the wrong number on the database, leading to police stops and much embarassment. And, potentially, vehicle seizures had this happened "out of hours".
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2014 22:35:49 +0100, newshound wrote:
[...]

I've heard so many horror stories of this type that I refuse to deal with any insurance company that won't send me either a paper certificate or email me a PDF *before* my old insurance expires. The person I dealt with last year told me that it wasn't possible, but soon changed their mind when I said OK, there are plenty of other companies that will do it.
On average it seems to take around five days from renewal for the details on MID to be updated. You Could be AMPR-pinged during that time.
Chris
--
Remove prejudice to reply.

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On 28/08/2014 08:43, Chris Whelan wrote:

I drove round for three months without my reg. numbers being on the system. In my area that means going past a huge number of anpr cameras including the ones at the Dartford crossing, yet no stops ! My insurers had failed to put my numbers back on (or leave them on) at renewal. I only found out in an idle moment when I decided to check on askmid. My insurers had sent me the list of insured vehicles when I renewed.
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