Smokey smell inside car

My engine takes a maximum 3.7 litres of oil according to the handbook, and I saw the oil change mechanic tip in most of the 4 litre container and he then
checked the level and then for some reason went ahead and tipped in all of it. The dipstick now reads above the maximum level. It's an early model T3 Corolla.
If it runs stationary in the driveway it soon smells very smoky there, which must be the excess oil level burning off?
But yesterday driving through a bit of traffic with the windows shut, and the heater fan going on the lowest setting and with the air intake vent set to only taking in the outside air, it began to smell Smokey inside the car.
Is this likely to be a normal consequence of excess oil in the car? Or is it likely to be that something else is adrift,to let a Smokey smell inside the car whilst travelling?
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D. T. Green wrote:

a slight overfill of oil will make no real difference. The smoke smell is more likely to be spilt oil on the exhaust burning off. Other causes could be a leak from the top end of the engine or a misplaced/split breather pipe. Why not take it back and ask the person that did the job? If it is just spilt oil on the exhaust then it will soon burn off.
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On 16/05/2012 16:44, Mrcheerful wrote:

On the contrary it will shove the oil pressure sky high and do damage. Get it drained off now.
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Sam wrote:

Not true. A major overfill of oil may increase crankcase pressure and cause leaks and even oil burning and damage, but it cannot effect the actual oil pressure which is determined by the state of the engine components (especially the crankshaft, oil pump and oil pressure relief valve) the grade of oil and ambient temperature.
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On Fri, 25 May 2012 14:47:33 +0100, Sam wrote:

How on earth can it possibly shove the oil pressure high??
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Regards - Rodney Pont
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Sam wrote:

If it has any effect on oil pressure, it'll be to reduce it.
If the oil level is high enough for the crankshaft to hit it, you'll be pumping oil containing air bubbles.
John
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On 26/05/2012 7:14 AM, John Henderson wrote:

That mean that we should not take corners at high speed?
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Rob wrote:

That becomes more of a problem if the oil level is too high, but usually manifests as oil smoke from all the oil that gets thrown up the bores rather than excessively low oil pressure. Too low a level of oil and you can get oil starvation when cornering or braking. These are some of the reasons that a dry sump system is used on race cars (and a few really fast road cars.)
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D. T. Green wrote on 16/05/2012 :

A fraction above the Max will make little difference, a lot above Max will cause excess pressure in the crankcase and damage oil seals.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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