Help !1993 Nissan Pickup Bucking, hesitation:

Hi a buddy gave me his 1993 Nissan Pickup two wheel drive 2.4L to do an oil service, and change the valve cover gasket since it was
leaking oil. With 144,000 well maintained miles, the truck ran fine on the way over to my shop. I did an oil service, topped-off all of the fluids, set the tire pressure, etc. I removed the cylinder head cover, replaced the gasket (Nissan Part) torqued it down, filled the crankcase, and went to deliver the truck. It bucked and puked, really loaded up with fuel. I checked all of the hose connections, vacuum and electrical, nothing loose that I can see and it really runs lousy. Any ideas here are appreciated.
Thanks,
Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ahhh, the 4 cylinder model. :-) Sorry it's been a long time and the mind is fading on certain things, but on the underneath of the air cleaner housing there should be an electrical connection. If memory serves me right, there are 2 wires on this connector and I'm thinking one is green and one is yellow. Make sure the wires are in good shape (no stretched wiring, frayed insulation, etc.) and that where they enter the connector they aren't pulled out and that the connectors are clean inside. I'm sorry I can't remember what it controls or anything more, but I remember on many occasions they would come in the shop and one or both of those wires would be broken and cause similar issues. We simply soldered in an appropriate length of the same gauge wiring (adding length so the problem of being stretched apart wouldn't happen again), sealed off the solder points with shrink tubing and they were back on the road.
Should that be ok, don't forget to check around the backside of the valve cover where the main harness is. It's very easy to pinch the wiring when reinstalling the cover and expose a few wires to possibly short out. Lastly, there was also a problem with some of the 4 cylinder models where a common ground point inside that main harness around that same area was weak. It was usually verified by having the engine running and moving/wiggling the harness around to see if it caused the engine to start/stop running smooth. If that's the case then you'll need to open up the wiring loom at that general area and locate where several (I'm thinking 3-6) wires come together at a crimped metal clamp. Inspect that clamp to make sure there is no corrosion or dirt in the area. Then take your handy soldering iron and carefully solder the wires around that clamp making sure it flows in good between all the wires *BUT* being very careful not to melt any insulation. It's a bit tricky given the work area available once you open up the harness, just take your time.
Good luck and let us know what you find in the end,
Wil
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm with, "I'm with stupid" previous poster
I've had similar problems with almost every petrol (gasoline) car I've owned
So *might* be just that, and be a co-incidence it's while you've had it to work on
Unlike old carbs, jets sometimes hard to get at to remove and clean, but a repair can usually be effected thus
Take a large cloth NOT handkerchief, but an old tee shirt for example. ball up in your hands, with engine idling and aircleaner removed
temporarily hold ball of cloth overtop carb air intake and rev the engine up gently then ease off, several times, (use hand on throttle linkage) while temporarily choking the air intake with balled cloth (don't let the engine quite stall out)
This creates a MEGA size vacuum which will normally suck through any gritty bits right through the carbs jets. This system can be done for free, and on side of road if necessary, as all you need is a large cloth DO NOT USE SMALL CLOTH like a hanky that might concievably get sucked right in !
ALSO you can use the following AS WELL as the above...........Note that spray cans of **carb cleaner** can be bought at your local auto parts store. Use as per instructions on can, but usually you remove the air filter, and with a warm engine/choke off, run the car at a fast idle (use hand on throttle linkage while spraying down the throat of the carbs air intake, several good sized shots from the spraycan. Then turn off engine, and spray again. Then wait 5 minutes, start up and drive away (allows some of the solvent to seep down inside other carby bits)
I bought a can of this carby spray for about ten Aussie dollars contains about 450 gr/1 pound and gave my car several treatments, plus did several friends cars, one decent large treatment each (heaps of spray). My car needed several treatments to come right, but has been perfect for more than a year since. so a can gives you 10 to 20 treatments easily. And with many older cars fuel hiccups, one treatment would probably suffice
cheers
Spam-block in action
Catherine Jemma.......(Keeper of The Gem of Amara) Outback Western Australia .... snipped-for-privacy@agn.net.au.knickers
(Remove knickers before replying)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.