'88 900i new owner questions.

I've just aquired a '88 900i with an apparently genuine 75k mileage. What a nice car. I always fancied one back in the 80's but never had the required
amount of cash to play. Now it seems they all go for next to nothing. Maybe I'll look for a 16V Turbo now :-)
I've sorted the exhaust knocking on the bottom of the boot - that was a huge improvement, and upped the tickover to where it should be - that's made a huge difference to the smootheness of gearchange.
So those jobs done I turned my attention to the ignition timing. I pointed the xenon timing light at where the marks are supposed to be but I'll be beggared if I can see them. My usual strategy in this situation is to mark them with a dab of white paint. Of course you have to turn the engine round till they are to hand to mark. But because of the backwards nature of the engine I can't just put a socket on a pulley bolt and turn. Is there an available nut on the clutch end under that cover? Any tips?
And the alternator light stays on till I blip the throttle then it stays off - regulator? Can you replace the regulator on it's own?
And the right hand wing is beginning to rust along the seam - a usual place it seems. What's your favourite strategy for curing rust? It's years since I have had a car that needed rust treatment.
Cheers all, I expect I may have other questions as I run up to speed as it were.
Sam
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Sam wrote:

No, there isn't. There's just a little plastic oil flinger.

Turn the flywheel? Put car in 3rd and push it? The timing marks will be there, they're fairly deep markings on the flywheel. It must be pretty dirty for you not to be able to see them.

More likely the bushes, but yes, you can replace the regulator/bush pack.

Depends how much rust. Start off by wirebrushing back to clean metal (cup brush in angle grinder) in there's plenty of metal left, then just clean up, prime, fill if necessary then paint. If the metal is holed, then weld a patch.

Have fun.
--
Grunff

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Doh! a simple solution and one I used to use years ago - I guess having an auto for a couple of years hastened my forgetting.

Actually the markings were fairly faint and softened by corrosion. I had to shine a torch just to identify the 20 degree mark. I dabbed a blob of tipex onto the 18 degree mark and then it was easy to see. The mark seemed to move around quite a bit - it was blurred but pretty much where it should be.

Cool I'll look into that at least the voltage seems steady when running.

I am so far - after a Volvo 740 estate the Saab is somewhat more engaging to drive.
Cheers
Sam
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