OT Checking bearing temperatures

A friend of mine from the late 50 / early 60's was a former enginemen on a USCG Wind-class (ex-navy) icebreaker. The icebreaker show on the History channel last week started me
thinking about him and I just looked up that class ship. It has three 10,000 HP Diesel-electric power plants, according to Fahey.
Jim told me that they checked the the "big end" conrod bearing temperature like this.
Stand beside the engine, facing the hole in the base through which you can see the crankshaft revolving with a big-end bearing attached. Make a circular motion with your open hand near the rotating "big end" until you are in sync with it. Move your hand forward and hold the rod end through at least one rotation. Then check the rest (11?). All should be the same temp.
(If the engines shown on the ship in the show were the same, that means thery were opposed-piston and one of the crankshafts was way up in the air!)
Since it took me six years before I was sure I could tie a squareknot properly, I would not want to do that in a rolling sea, and boy, do icebreakers roll!
Karl
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One night on the bridge while we were underway I heard this discussion between the engine room and the shaft alley watch on my headphones: "Engine room, shaft alley. One of these bearings is getting a little hot". (This was a single screw ship built in 1941 for Matson Lines, and used wooden saddles for shaft bearings) "How hot, can you hold your hand on it for one minute"? "Yes, it's pretty warm though" "Is it smoking"? "No". "Throw some water on it"!
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That is weird but true. Wooden bearing! http://www.engnetglobal.com/c/c.aspx/WOO003/brands

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Hmmm,
Those bearing illustrated on the Web page sure don't look like lignum vitae. I've got a log of it at home, must be the better part of 100 years old. The heartwood is black, and the sapwood is a rich yellow. It's so dense it won't float, and contains a natural oil, so that no finish will adhere to it.
I'd love to use some to make a wood overlay for a Hawk or Avanti dash. It's really very pretty stuff.
Gord Richmond

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They probably can't get the big old stuff anymore. Gotta use young trees.

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I was on a WWII Liberty ship turned in to an air search radar ship. It was powered by a three-cylinder steam reciprocating engine (I think it was 77 rpm max). The crank and bearings were out in the open. Some of the snipes used to hop on the crankshaft, hold on to the connecting rod and ride the thing. Paul Johnson
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Mr. Gilmore was our communications officer, and also a good guy. We got a 'fancy' new XO who thought we should have a bugler! On an auxiliary? Anyway, they found a guy on board that could bugle, sorta. He didn't do too bad usually. One day around mid-morning the bugle call for general quarters sounded. As two of us took off forward, the announcement came......"Mail call"!
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On 28 Jul 2006 21:41:33 -0700, you wrote:

it also does NOT float, and also takes metal working tools to form into anything..
--Shiva--
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