Oil Filter got wet

My brand new oil filter (still in box) got left outside and a puddle of rain water soaked the box. It didn't look like it was drenched but the whole box was wet. I took the filter out of the box
and it was dry except for the rubber seal, which was wet because it touched the bottom of the box. I can't detect any water inside the filter. Can I still use this filter or should I chuck it and get another one.
Thanks, Wayne
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rain water soaked the box. It didn't look like it

If it was sitting with the gasket side down I would use it. If it got water into it........no
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No Way wrote:

??????
Silly question time: why not?
Let's say the filter DID get water inside. Before installing, the OP turns it upside down and drains whatever water he can. Then he installs it and takes the car out for a long enough run to get everything up to operating temps, and any water in the system will be evaporated. Whatever little water was in the filter at startup will be forced thru the system quickly without causing any more harm than the air in a fresh filter on startup, maybe less. And there was probably no more water in the filter at installation than in the sumps of many cars after a short run in very cold winter conditions.
Of course, the filter could just be set aside to dry and used at the next oil change. Ever get a filter with rust on it straight out of the box? I've seen more than a few... I'd bet they get wet frequently in transit or warehousing. What did I miss?
Rick
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Your advice to set it aside to dry is good but, aren' the insides of most oil filters made of paper? The ratio of oil filter cost to major engine repair cost would keep me from just pouring the water out and using the filter. Thinking about a lump of paper goo traveling through the system, coupled with the now compromised filtering ability of the filter itself, gives me the willies. In the old days when water was more prevalent in gasoline, the paper fuel filters would get wet and become impassable to gasoline. Even if the paper element didn't turn to goo, the oil will bypass and not be filtered.
If you're sure it was kept gasket side down, AND you're short on funds, AND you don't mind a little risk, I'd let it dry for a while and use it.
Carl 1 Lucky Texan
Rick Courtright wrote:

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On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 09:03:36 -0700, Rick Courtright wrote:

Thanks for the reply. The filter was kept gasket side down. If any water got into the filter, it got there through moisture in the air; the box was wet all the way through.
Wayne
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if the paper gets water soaked it could distort inside or breakup or get out of shape it is designed for oil not water moisture gets carried by the oil

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6 bucks...get a new filter.

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No kidding... I was *so* tempted to write the same thing way back when this thread started. All this talk and discussion over a couple of dollars! What a waste. My peace-of-mind would have demanded tossing out the wet filter and getting a new one! John
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