Red Lead - Still Used?

I haven't done large scale body work in ages... but back in the day, we always used a tube of red lead to fill the minor imperfections. In
watching the various rebuild shows on TV, I don't see anyone using it anymore. I do see them bondoing the whole car... not so sure I like that. The do block out the whole car, but then it's back to more bondo if there's an imperfection.
Is red lead still in use? Or is everyone using large amounts of bondo?
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Around here, "red lead" was a term used for a red primer coat, perhaps originally containing lead. This same paint was used to spray rear end gears to "pattern" them as a check on the adjustment.
"Leading" a car with real metallic lead was often done in the old days. It came in bars, rolls, etc and was heated and applied to the tinned surface when it was about the consistency of butter.
I dont know of anyone locally who could or would use lead anymore. It might not even be legal.
The polymeric fillers like Bondo can do a good job and last a long long time if applied properly.
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 07:40:54 -0500, hls wrote:

I got two bars of it...
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I am using putty (wood putty) to fill in nail holes while I am working on my house. cuhulin
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Good application! Won't rust around that sort of patch.
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Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/ wrote:

I have a few too. But after much bitching years ago, I have to admit the "lead free lead" works just as well.
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Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/ wrote:

I still have a bunch and use it if I'm doing a classic. Normal work gets bondo....
It is getting difficult to buy the good stuff any more though.
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me wrote:

Red Lead is no longer available. Now the tools of choice are poly filler or aluminum filled poly filler. For small pin holes or grinding marks there is spot putty.
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wrote:

I see that my slang was a bad idea. We used to call it red lead, but I think it was really "spot putty". Came in a large tube about 2" in diameter and 8" long. Seemed like primer that had the consistency of peanut butter coming out of the tube. Traditionally it was red in color. I always thought that it was named "red lead" because it was some sort of lead based paint as a base.
So, let's change my post... anyone using "spot putty" anymore?
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 10:07:23 -0400, me wrote:

Got two tubes of it in the garage...
There's also "glazing putty" which is the same thing, only different. ;) (It's not red...)
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me wrote:

Yes, where 3 passes of wetsanded primer would take too long. It's great for sandscratches and other similar minor fills.
I use metallic lead substitute for actual dents. Others use polyester fillers. Both work. A glob of spot putty can shrink and crack, spoiling the job.
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 12:41:43 -0700, "Dick Cheney" <Dick

I was taught to only put it on with a razor blade or thick squeegee to fill very minor imperfections like sanding scratches and to use filler for anything that was actually "filling", so I doubt mine did much cracking, but your experience is noted!
Still, I wonder about the use of bondo type fillers. Do you put them on with a razor blade when you are down to some minor sanding scratches, or do you just fill with sandable primer until they're smooth?
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me wrote:

Spot putty is available. BUT it no longer contains the lead pigment which gave it the red color (and the red lead name) and is now called "glazing putty". Now you can get it in red, green, black and blue.
It's even harder to get body lead now. I'm glad I stocked up a few years ago.
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With all due respect, Steve, I dont think the pigment was a lead based compound.
Glazing putty has been around a long time.
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How about Fiberglass? for filling in holes and dents? I have done some fiberglassing on some other things before. cuhulin
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Fiberglass, either as the cloth mat or as the chopped fiber mixed with the polyester, can be a satisfactory medium for a lot of fixes.
If it is done correctly and used for the right applications, it works well.
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hls wrote:

Most of the colors produced until about 1978 used lead pigments for the colorant.
White was basic lead carbonate, red is a lead oxide, blue comes from lead sulfate, with lead oxide carbon and some zinc oxide, yellow, orange, green, were lead chromates.
Take a look at just about every Navy ship built and the base color under that paint will still be red lead primer.
The spot putty/glazing putty that was sold up till about 1980 used lead based pigments. Primary reason being that nothing developed to replace the lead pigment held up as well.
It is also the reason why the prices of red, blue and yellow auto paints went through the roof when lead pigments were dropped. The reds went up almost 300% as did the blue.
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 17:32:14 -0400, "Steve W."

I picked up some bulk lead a while back for another project. The price has become rediculous. I understand our conflicts abroad have resulted in much lead being turned into ammo never to be returned to the system. Ammo is also in a bit of a shortfall these days with an accompaning high price when available.
As far as the red lead goes, IIRC, all paint containing lead was banned by the Federalis in the late 60's or early 70's. It was good stuff for it's day but modern paints, fillers and coatings properly applied are far superior for metal protection.
Lugnut
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