Need info/experience with upgrades to increase load handling on 00 Silverado?

I have a 2000 Silverado 2500 with the ext cab and a short bed. The stock GVWR is 2395. I'm looking at a couple of the Lance campers that are designed for a short bed but I'm told they are suited only for the
HD version of my truck.
I suppose this is a good enough reason to start looking for another truck but my camper usage will only be temporary. Therefore, I'm looking for any inputs on upgrades that might allow me to safely increase my load rating.
Thanks for any experience or suggestions people would be willing to share.
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Gross vehicle weight rating is the vehicle weight plus load, only 2395, are you sure.

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I might have used the wrong term. There is a label in the glove box titled "Truck Camper Information." It specifies 2395 lb as the "Cargo Weight Rating." Sorry, this is new ground for me.
wrote:

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2395 GVWR must be a typo; the truck weighs considerably more than 2395,. 2395 may be the total payload. To Deuce, you might weigh the truck with a full tank of gas any passengers you plan to carry with the camper, and all planned luggage (food, ice, clothing,chairs, bikes, etc. etc. then get the dry weight of the camper, add all known weights like fresh water capacity, propane capacity, etc. add everything together and see what you come up with for an estimated GVWR and compare it to the plate on the drivers side door jam.

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Correct.

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wrote:

What ultimately determines true safe weight capacity is frame, springs, tires and axles. If you have a 2000 3/4 ton new style SIlverado, you have a LD 3/4 ton as HD models in 2000 were still old style trucks. The older models had more springs in rear (more than even newer 2500HD's) and had the old 14 bolt FF rear axle that itself can handle about 4 tons. (as long as springs, frame and tires were up to it too) If you have the 14 bolt semi floater (easily ID'ed by no hubs sticking out through rims) it has a rated capacity of about 3 tons (again spring, chassis and tires permitting) As other poster sated I think you are confusing GCC (Gross Cargo Capacity) with GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating). Door sticker shold have GVW and GVWR FRT (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Front Axle) and GVWR RR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Rear Axle). These rating are based the rated capacity limits of the weakest part on each axle (usually springs or tires) It is possible to safely increase GVW or GAWR (GAWR is axle capacity rating) a bit if you adjust/modify springs or tires as long as you do not exceed the capacity of weakest element. Brake play a role here too but 3/4 tons usually do not suffer from marginal brakes so there is some room here. As a general rule, 3/4 tons have a lot more reserve capacity avaible with some tweaking because unlike 1/2 tons whose ratings are usually limited by axle capacity, 3/4 tons have more beef there to work with. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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