how do I tell which is exhaust and which is the intake valve with the intake manifold on?

I aplogoze in advance because this is probably a dumb question, but I cannot find the answer to it.
I had a heck of a noise going on in my 350 V8 chevy engine. I checked
it out and one of the rocker arms was quite loose.
I am reading up on how to set the clearance on the lifters. I snag #1 cyl and get it at TDC using the marks on the flywheel. I can tell the cyl # by the stamp on the engine block. Then I can set certain exhaust and intakes to proper clearance. No problem since all the cylinder numbers are marked on the head.
1. BUT how do I tell which is exhaust and which is the intake valve with the intake manifold on? Been looking in the book and I see no info on that.
Then I move and set it for #6 cyl and then do the rest of the rocker settings.
2. Been wondering how come that rocker was so loose. As I understand it, the hydraulic lifter is just an oil filled damper chamber to take up erratic slackness within fine limits. If it was stuck it would make a clicking noise, but would not be THAT loose? Or do I misunderstand?
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seem just fine and oil comes out exactly as it should.
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Starting on the left No. 1 valve is exhaust, 2&3 are intake 4 & 5 are exhaust, 6 & 7 are intake and 8 is exhaust. It has been a while but I used the "add to 9 method" meaning when #1 is fully open adjust #8, when #2 is open adjust #7, etc.
Good luck PDDeen
PDDeen
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On 4/7/2011 20:24, BSAKing wrote:

Look at the runners on the intake manifold.
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An update: I had the valve covers off and the #3 from the back on the passenger side on the 350 V8 chevy block was loose as all get out. I could adjust it down a bit and it helped remove some slap, but some noise is still there. I noticed that I do not think the valve and spring assembly seem to travel quite as much as the others when running. The vehicle does not seem to run poorly though.
Does this sound symptomatic of a collapsed hydraulic lifter?
The car is garaged up here in Canada during the winter, run infrequently over that time period, and the engine is all original, so I am thinking this is (hopefully) the cause and replacing the lifter(s) would fix the problem. I change the oil myself and I have not noticed any filings or debris in it, so I am hoping that this does not mean there is a cam lobe badly worn.
Does this sound likely or am I just being hopeful?
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On 4/14/2011 13:27, BSAKing wrote:

I suppose it's possible the stud is pulling out too.
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wrote:

About that time Chevrolet had a hot spot in the center of the valve train due to engine temperature increase. It crystallized the oil and ground the cam lobes down. Cure was a new cam and lifters. Had to replace both on my '74 and '78 at about 70K.
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