halogen headlights

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azwiley1 wrote:


My first Silver Star burnout came after just one year, and I hardly used them. There used to be a chart somewhere, I think on Sylvania's own site, that listed life expectancy of their various bulbs. The Silver Star's hours were much less than Xtravision or any of the other bulbs.
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I believe you are correct.... it seems I also saw somewhere that Sylvania warns you that the Silverstars aren't as long lived as their other bulbs, but four years ain't bad for the extra light output.
Mike
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> My first Silver Star burnout came after just one year, and I hardly used

Four years for lights that were almost ALWAYS on is something that I would not complain about. I hated that damn auto daytime running light set up on the Silvy, but at least on mine, when you disable it (by removing the bulb) it turns your heads on, all the time. They have been great for me, love the fact that I can see VERY well at night in the desert, so I won't change.
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azwiley1 wrote:

Excerpts from Daniel Stern's Blue Bulb page:
"The cost? Bulb lifetime. The filament changes made to produce enough extra light that the bulb will still be legal despite the blue-filtration losses mean the filament's lifespan is shortened considerably."
"The Sylvania SilverStar bulbs have a very short lifetime, because the filament is overdriven to get a legal amount of light despite the blue glass."
I think my light circuit upgrade, with relays and shorter heavier wires routed more directly from battery to bulbs, did away with a lot of voltage loss present in the stock circuit. The overdriven Silver Stars won't live long under full power, but I would never have known with the stock wiring. I'd just be impressed that my voltage-starved Silver Stars were shining noticeably brighter than my voltage-starved stock bulbs did.
Since the upgrade, the Xtravisions have already surpassed the poor Silver Stars' meager lifetime. And the truck's original 6-year-old 9004 bulbs are doing fine as inboard High Beams.
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Well, I guess since I don't drive a Dodge, I drive a Silvy that was factory with the dual headlight set up and I use the 9005 & 9006 series bulbs, I don't have to worry about anything. I guess it just boils down to using what ever works for you. Shame though, that Dodge had such a poor design on the head lights.
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azwiley1 wrote:

It's a shame you missed the point. When your Silver Stars last for 4 years, that doesn't indicate that your Chevy has a nice light circuit design. It indicates that you're spending watts to heat up wires instead of filaments.
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I didn't miss anything. You are quoting that because of the design of the bulb, it has a shorter life span. Compared to what? It's a freaking light bulb, how damn long is it suppose to last? If is it lasting me 4 or more years and a cost of 40 bucks for a set of two, how is this a problem?
Also, if you were to read his site a little closer, he is using that H1 bulb as a reference, which is a bulb that is not on my Silvy, but even if it were, a long life bulb (per the site) is rated at 1200 life hours. You don't think that in a four year period, 1200hr life hours is not exceeded? Again, how long (in years) should it last?
Another thing that I don't see any reference to on his site, is where you get the notion that I am "heating up wires" All that it states is that "The Sylvania SilverStar bulbs have a very short lifetime, because the filament is overdriven to get a legal amount of light despite the blue glass." I believe you are making an assumption here, based off the "upgrades" you made to your vehicle and trying to compare them in retrospect to mine. Sorry, but the light circuitry on our vehicles are vastly different and just because something is one way on yours does not mean the same for me.
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azwiley1 wrote:

Compared to Sylvania's own Xtravision bulb, for example. Putting blue tint on the Silver Star glass has to cost something - either brightness, or life, or a little of both.

For you, it's not much of a problem. A four year life, rather than 6 or perhaps 8, is still very reasonable. And you like the whiteness more than you want a few more years of bulb life. I probably would have remained happy with mine too in the original higher-resistance circuit.

Four years is enough. Silver Stars aren't going to live 4 years in a good circuit.

Your heating up everything that has electrical resistance. If you dim your dashboard lights, you may notice that the dimmer switch gets warmer. Same phenomenon. Ask Nosey. Read Stern's page about relays. http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/relays/relays.html

It means exactly the same for both of us. Power (watts) is dissipated across a voltage drop. Your Silver Stars last acceptably long because resistance in the rest of the circuit is reducing voltage at the bulbs.
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No need to ask me anything. I think azwiley1 knows more about electricity than the both of us.
--
Ken



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Nosey wrote:

Doubtful...
"Have you measured the resistance levels on the Silvy's lighting circuit?"
He apparently thinks Chevy and Dodge can each use different versions of Ohms Law.
"Do you know what the resistance levels are on each of the four bulbs? I know I don't off the top of my head as I have never had a reason to measure it."
It needs to be calculated, but he apparently thinks you can get something meaningful by measuring the resistance across a cold bulb.
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What ever, little do you know about me or my back ground.

No, I don't think that, nor did I imply that. I did ask you though if you knew the resistance of the Silvy lighting circuit, which you did not answer. Obviously you don't know. Stock for stock how do you know that the resistance in your Ram was not equal to, greater or less then that of my Chevy? You don't. So to imply that the resistance of my lighting circuit is as restrictive as you seem to be implying, is ludacris. You can't substanciate it. Wire gauge, wire run lenght, relays, etc all factor into the resistance level of the circuit, but gee, you should know that right?

Where did I ever state anything about measuring a bulb, warm or cold? I stated just want you left in place above. So please don't put words where they are not. My point, which you apparently over looked or missed (you must be practicing Buddism!) is that you (nor I) know the resistance of the lighting circuit on the Silvy. Which means, that to back up your statements concerning bulb life, heating of the wires, et all., are not substantiated. You are making assumptions not verified statements.
Pointing back to Dan's website. Have you (or anyone) ever ask how he verified his data? Not saying it is not correct, but was the data complied from manufactures, from a test bench, from real world applications or from all of the mentioned?
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azwiley1 wrote:

You're the guy who installs car stereos, right?

Here's where you implied it: "Sorry, but the light circuitry on our vehicles are vastly different and just because something is one way on yours does not mean the same for me."
My own light circuitry is also vastly different than it used to be. So? I can still compare the two. And based on your impressive 4-year Silver Star bulb life, I can pretty well guess that your factory Chevy wiring is comparable to factory Dodge wiring.

I should know it, I do know it, that's why I've been chattering about wire gauge, and length, and relays, and amps heating up light switches.

You stated that you never had a reason to measure it.
"I have never had a reason to measure it."
You can't measure the resistance of operating light bulbs. And there's no need for us to know what it is anyway.

My statements concerning bulb life, heating of the wires, et al aren't theories.

He distrusts manufacturers' hype.
Looking around Sylvania's site, I found this: http://tinyurl.com/29sukn
Line No. 1 - Standard Line No. 2 - Cool Blue Line No. 3 - Long Life Line No. 4 - ? Line No. 5 - SilverStar Line No. 6 - Xtravision
Surprisingly, SilverStar is rated 10 hours better than Xtravision on High Beam. But SilverStar is by far the lowest on Low Beam. Neither is particularly long lived though.
So based on a 150 hour expected life at 12.8 volts, and considering mine burned out in a year, and considering you drive a *lot* at night and yours lasted 4 years, you really think your bulbs are getting close to their full 12.8 volts? I certainly don't.
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But see here, you are comparing the high resistance Dodge lighting circuit to your own Dodge "low resistance" modified circuit and then trying to make a direct comparision to my Silvy's lighting circuit. Have you measured the resistance levels on the Silvy's lighting circuit? Do you know what the resistance levels are on each of the four bulbs? I know I don't off the top of my head as I have never had a reason to measure it.
Ok, you had a "bad" experience with the SilverStars. In your set up they don't seem to last long, no problem. However, there is no way that one can reasonably say that the other bulbs would infact last the 6 or 8 years you state. Are they classed as a longer life bulb, sure, but this is subjective to the vehicles, the amount they are used and other enviormental factors (like Mike's deer hunting truck <BG>

Again, do you have specific knowledge of the lighting circuit in the Silvy?

True, to a point.
If you dim your

Never have I had such a problem. As an FYI, I do most of my driving in the dark, to and from work daily (1.5 hrs each way (which sucks)) and have made three or four cross country trips from AZ to NY and back for which the lights were always on. Not at one time did I have anything even get remotely warm from anything other then the heater.
Not saying that it can't happen but that it has never happen in my truck.

Again, do you have specific knowledge of the lighting circuit in the Silvy?
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While I don't remember the year of your Chevy, in the late 90's if you got the standard Cheyenne trim level you got the old H 6054 lights. Somewhat equivalant to the standard Dodge lights vs. the sport lights? But even with that said it's inexcusable to have to pay extra to get adequate lighting. I think the original Intrepid lights were even worse.
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It's a new body style 99 Silvy. This is when Chevy started changing from the C/K series (back) to the Silverado line, there was no Cheyenne package available. It's the Silverado with the LS or LT packaging at a few different levels.
I do agree with you 100% though, it is a shame that we have to pay for better lighting because the manufactures will not flip the bill and put them in. If the European makers can, including Benz, you would think that at least Chrysler would.
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On Mon, 22 Jan 2007 23:13:29 +0000, General Dog wrote:

This is for a '96 2500. Are the '96 2500 Sport model headlights better than the regular model stock units?
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Chuck Dubois wrote:

Yes, but I changed to Sport headlights + relays + 10-gauge wiring + Silver Star bulbs all at once so I can't say how much improvement is attributable to what.
I think any year Sport headlight will fit any year of 2nd-generation truck, with a minor bit of plastic trimming necessary to fit earlier Sport light brackets on later model trucks. Alternately, it looked to me like the standard light brackets could be trimmed to accept Sport headlight shells.
Daniel Stern supplied my "RIK-RAM" relay kit, Sport headlights came from eBay. I went to Radio Shack for spiral wire wrap for a tidy mouse-resistant harness, and a plastic Project Box that I mounted atop the factory fuse box to house the new relays. 10-gauge wires were a struggle, I'd use #12 if I had to do it again.
Here's my headlight circuit: http://tinyurl.com/2mmqeq And... it works! I think the switch on the dash runs cooler too, without the heavy amps running through it.
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