How many MPG does the Dodge Ram 4.7 Reg. cab 4x4 get?

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Im looking to get a 02' or 03' 4.7L Reg Cab 4x4 Dodge Ram and I just wanted to know how many MPG to expect out of it.

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13-15 MPG if you're lucky.

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wrote:

Yes, if MPG is a big concern for you, you can not put a small engine is a big heavy CC and expect miracles in MPG area. I doubt it would do much better (if at all) than a like truck that was Hemi powered. You need a smaller truck like a dakota if you want good performance and MPG from a 4.7. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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SnoMan wrote:

I like the Dakotas but those Rams are the best looking trucks in my opinion. I hear a lot of people saying different numbers when it comes to MPG on different message boards, any where from 19-10. You dont know who to beleive but if it is possible to get 15 I would be happy with that.
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I would be skeptical of anything over 13, my personal experience with dodge trucks (gas burners anyways) is fairly low MPG. if you want my honest opinion on the fuel mileage matter, buy a Cummins powered ram in the year models your looking at. you wont be sorry. I'm personally seeing 19 mpg on average around town. 18 if I run her hard. and have seen 21 on a trip where I kept it round 65 or less.
my current truck is a 05 2500 6 speed.
my wife had a Durango with the 360 and only got 12, witch she was really disappointed with because the truck I had at the time was a 99 8.0 liter v10 and was getting 10 - 11 with my lead foot.
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realmccoykennels via CarKB.com wrote:

I didn't know a discount-brand spic-built pickup truck could be used as a fashion accessory? Your trailer park must be a low budget production.
JS
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Not all Ram trucks are built in Mexico. Go back to school and get a refund on that hillbilly "education" you got.

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I normally got 13-15 in the city and 16-18 on the highway. I had a 2003 quad-cab 1500 with the 4.7L. If you want a pickup with better gas mileage, get a Ford Ranger or similar. If you want to tow, then you ain't goin' get great mileage. I purchased the 1500 over a Dakota because it had a "full" 6-foot bed without a bed-extender and it had more room. Yeah, the Dakota has similar tow ratings, but it's definitely not as roomy as the 1500.
M2CW, Hawkeye65
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My 04 ram quadcab with hemi and 3.55 gears gets 11.8 around town. This is after adding a K&N air intake system and a Gibson dual extreme exhaust system.

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wrote:

Beleive it or not these mods, especaily the exhaust mod hurt your MPG in town. There is a lot of misconceptions out there on what duals or custom exhaust do to engine efficency and MPG. If it was that easy to gain HP and MPG they would come that way from factory given the pressure they are under for fleet MPG averages but there are those that think detriot is stupid about this. Modern engine are well tuned from intake to exhaust tip and when you start "improving" it, you usually make it your MPG worse especailly in town. I could explain why too. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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SnoMan wrote:

Thanks for the imput from everyone. Im probably going to stick with getting a Ram and drive it like a granny. LOL!!
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On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 13:58:20 GMT, "realmccoykennels via CarKB.com"

Me, I am done buying new big iron. O have a few older ones long paided for and in excellant shape that I use when I need them otherwise it is 4 bangers for daily chores which saves money and makes the big iron last a lot longer too. Anything I buy new is going to be cheap to run because gas is only going to cost more as time goes on. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

That's why you buy a diesel and start growing your own fuel.

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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 01:54:32 -0500, "GeekBoy"
You can grow you own fuel for a gas engine too and when the cellulous/ethanol process gets on line you can make it about 5 times cheaper than with current distillation processes for ethanol and not use food source for fuel like you have to with Bio and current Ethanol. Honestly I think the future for a light diesel is bleak in coming years because it cannot adapt to different fuels like a "gas" motor can. A gas motor design can be run on Gas, Alchol, P-series fuels, Hydrogen, Methane (Natural gas) and Propane just to name a few. Bio Diesel fuel has problems of its own and it will never been a viable long term solution, just a "curiousity" for a while. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

Bio is more than just a curiosity, and it does not have to use "food sources" to make it. there is a company making bio not far from me that claim to use the trimmed chicken fat from a chicken plant near here, for one example. now tell me is that a food stock you would want to use?
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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 10:44:08 -0400, "Chris Thompson"

THey are using food products that would otherwise wind up in animal feed. Nothing is wasted from animal processing plants and was not before it was being used for BIO. BIO will never be a long term solution and like I said it is just a side track right now and little more. Sure somebody may make some money on it now but it will not be viable long term. You can take that to the bank.It is easy to make methanol from coal with distructive distilaltion but it is harder to make a diesel type fuel from it as it really needs to be made for a oil base stock. Diesel fuel supplies are being pinched more daily as it is also heat oil and current Admin pushed unwisely to have hundreds of new power plants built fueled by oil to support big oil lobbies (which further taxes supply) other than coal which we have the largest reserves of in the world. (a 300 to 500 year known supply) To give you even more insight on the problem here and Big Oils grip on government today, one ton of coal trades at about $50 a ton now and when you measure the BTU energy content of this (like for powering power plants) it costs about $350 for the same amount of energy in crude oil or about $450 for the refined heating oil/diesel fuel products at current trade prices. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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SnoMan wrote:

Biodiesel may not be the only answer but it's a start. As long as it can be produced by the home-brewer cheaper than buying diesel fuel at pump prices, it won't go away. Commercially produced biodiesel is being sold at the pumps at an increasing rate. The ideal situation for the longevity of biodiesel would be to sell the commerically produced product at the pump for less than what home-brewers can make it for. I'm not the type of person you would call an enviornmentalist. I do care about pollution and I don't go out of my way to intentionally harm the planet, but a tree-hugger I am not. If diesel fuel prices at the pump didn't go over $2.00 a gallon I probably would have never looked into biodiesel. Well, it did and now I'm making my own fuel for much less than that. Doing so raised my awareness of other energy alternatives too. I wouldn't say it changed my life, but it did change my way of thinking somewhat. Even if biodiesel is only a short term "side track" it sure helps /my/ fuel bill and it puts alternative energy a bit closer to the spotlight. The linked article below is long, but worth reading. It details some of the problems and some possible solutions of replacing all of the petroleum oil burned in the US for transportation with biodiesel (gasoline included). It's probably not going to happen but it addresses some of the issues you mentioned. Also, biodiesel burns very well in home oil furnaces. If I had an oil furnace it would be burning biodiesel this winter.
Coal? How much cleaner does coal burn than oil? I'd be curious to see an emissions comparison as used to fuel power generation facilities.
Widescale biodiesel production article from University of New Hampshire, Physics Department: http://www.unh.edu/p2/biodiesel/article_alge.html
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wrote:

Coal require more scrubbers to be clean but they both give off the same amount of CO2 and maybe when oil was 20/barrel it was cheaper to use oil but given oils volitilty and limited supply and price differentail it would still be cheaper than oil even if you spent a lot on scrubbers. The problem is the fer powerfull oil lobby that controls DC more than you know and they do not want to loose that control and let coal step in and current admin is not going to let it happen either b3ecause big oil is a big financer of current controlling party and they do not want to loose their backing. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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The supply of oil is not limited. According to data it should be at $29 a barrel looking at historical prices to supply history.

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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 17:35:23 -0500, "GeekBoy"

Where are you at Mars??? It is very limited and world demand will exceed world production in the next year or so and then prices will really climb.(it is predicted by some very smart people that we will see $100/barrel or more by end of 2007) It is a real pipe dream to think otherwise. In the US alone we use the equivlent of 125,000 semi tanker truck loads a day and growing and on the global level it is about 500,000 truck loads a day. You honestly beleive this is limitless? Bizzare. BTW we consume little over 25% of the worlds oil and have only 5% of population and our thristy is going to choke use one day because they only way the public will consever is when it gets to costly to buy it. Just since 2001 or lust for big iron and other energy needs has increase our oil consumption from about 20 million barrels a day to almost 25 million and growing and we not make less that 40% of what we use and it is driopping too. By 2020 the Dept of energy predict that we will produce only about 20% of the oil we need. The writing is on the wall but many choose to ignore it. When gas hits 4 to 5 bucks a gallon those 40K SUV's will not be worth squat. Choose wisely because you might get stuck with it in a few years. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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