water pump .... one step at a time

As much as I've enjoyed my 97 Ram, and use now as a work truck on a daily basis, sometimes working on it can be a bit of a pain.
Changed the waterpump yesterday.
First lesson I learned was that the fan shroud does not come off first. You must remove clutch fan assembly then pull the shroud and fan out at same time. A lousy 1/2" difference in shroud width and this would not be the case. As for the clutch fan..what a fricken pain in the ass. Using special tools, .... an adjustable wrench and crow bar, I successfully removed it allowing access to pump. Pump came off easily and replacement was quick, cept for one little glitch. The heater hose going to pump secures to a tube that is pressed into pump. This tube does not come with new pump and attempting to reuse the old one didnt work since it did not come out in one piece from old pump. Just glad advance auto was open till eleven last night.
I just have to question some of the engineering that goes into designing the layout of the truck ....ie last project was changing distributor cap and rotor (by feel) since it is placed in a spot that had to be intentionally designed to make it inaccessable, or at least as aggrevating as possible.
with 100k on vehicle, I took opportunity to change belt and thermostat at same time, along with hoses. Now I am wondering if I should have also done timing chain since I spent a fricken day doing a lousy water pump, i do not even want to think about getting in there again anytime soon.
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I have heard from people that have replaced the 'beer keg' intake with the M1, they its a lot easier to get to the distributer with the M1.
I changed the cap and rotor in my Dak, same deal. Maybe if you unbolt the cab, and jack it up about four inches, you sould be able to get to it.

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"" wrote: > As much as I've enjoyed my 97 Ram, and use now as a work truck > on a daily > basis, sometimes working on it can be a bit of a pain. > > Changed the waterpump yesterday. > > First lesson I learned was that the fan shroud does not come > off first. You > must remove clutch fan assembly then pull the shroud and fan > out at same > time. A lousy 1/2" difference in shroud width and this > would not be the > case. As for the clutch fan..what a fricken pain in the ass. > Using > special tools, .... an adjustable wrench and crow bar, I > successfully > removed it allowing access to pump. Pump came off easily and > replacement was > quick, cept for one little glitch. The heater hose going to > pump secures to > a tube that is pressed into pump. This tube does not come > with new pump and > attempting to reuse the old one didnt work since it did not > come out in one > piece from old pump. Just glad advance auto was open till > eleven last > night. > > I just have to question some of the engineering that goes into > designing the > layout of the truck ....ie last project was changing > distributor cap and > rotor (by feel) since it is placed in a spot that had to be > intentionally > designed to make it inaccessable, or at least as aggrevating > as possible. > > with 100k on vehicle, I took opportunity to change belt and > thermostat at > same time, along with hoses. Now I am wondering if I should > have also done > timing chain since I spent a fricken day doing a lousy water > pump, i do not > even want to think about getting in there again anytime soon.
You should increase your antifreeze consentration as the corroded tube/nipple is a sign that your currnet level is not doing it for you. ALso on cars with clutch fans mounted with a single big nut attaching them to water pump pulley, a strap wrench goes a long way it holding the pulley to break nut loose.
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A tip for the next time... leave the belt on. Put the wrench on the nut, handle sticking straight up, and smack it real good with a hammer counter-clockwise. It should come loose (always have for me). Conversely, when re-installing, it's much easier to leave the belt off, slide the shroud/fan into place, hold the fan/clutch still and spin the water pump pulley by hand to thread into the nut.

Yep - that's got to be one of the biggest PITA's... there are aftermarket pumps that have a threaded fitting here, instead of the stock press-in. On a friend's vehicle, we were able to get it out, but it wouldn't re-seal. Some Permatex brass putty (for repairing radiators - amazing stuff) all around the base of the tube finally sealed things up.

Not much consideration is given to servicability, unfortunately. changing the cap/rotor on a 5.2/5.9 isn't the easiest job in the world... it's a whole lot easier on a Hemi (the 426, not the 343 :)

Nah - fortunately, it's an actual chain, not a belt. It should be good to at LEAST 110K :)
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I have a question about my water pump. My 01 Ram 5.9 has a leaking water pump. The coolant doesn't make it to the ground. It seeps out little by little and burns off. You can look up underneath the truck to see the greenish color towards the top of the pump. I realize I could replace the pump now...but how do I know when I really have to replace it soon?
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When it starts making horrendous noise, shaking like a paint mixer, or when your engine overheats and siezes up on you.
If it's leaking coolant, that means the seal is shot, and you're getting coolant in the bearing. It's not long for this life... you can replace it now on your time, or replace it later (as in weeks, not months) when it decides it's time.
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Thanks Tom. I remember a while ago you or someone else directed me to the thermostat may be leaking (why I could smell coolant outside the truck, yet no leaks). I found the leak the other day when I was doing a service to replace the front u-joints. I fill the coolant overflow tank every other month. How long are we talking to replace the pump...and what else should be replaced while i'm at it? Hoses, thermostat, anything else?
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A few hours, if all goes well. Nothing's particularly complicated - just a little time-consuming (as noted previously in this thread)

Without question, the bypass hose (little 90 hose that connects from the pump into the intake manifold). I'd also do upper and lower radiator hoses, and heater hoses (if they're as original as the pump), as well as a thermostat (more of a "might as well", because it's still fairly easy to change out by itself, but as long as you're there....) As I said before, some aftermarket water pumps have a threaded fitting for the heater return hose, which is much more desirable than the factory tube/O-ring. Either get yourself a pump like that, or make sure you get a new tube assembly with the new waterpump. Trying to re-use the old one is more often than not an exercise in futility.
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