Strut tower brace question

The next step after my "Aubrun differential upgrade" project on my 105K mile 1988 straight Camaro is to try and and make the car like an Iroc (handling
wise) as much as possible. So as I'm waiting on my Auburn Posi unit to arrive, I've been researching, and I come accross 2 things (one of which I have a question). Seems like the Iroc's had this "Wonder bar" thing, and I guess in 1988, stress cracks were frequent around the steering box, so thats a no-brainer, I'm gonning to order a 3-hole per side aftermarket Wonder Bar (only likr $60). The question I have is, this "Strut Tower Brace" thing... Was it stock on the Iroc's? and is it a worthwhile addition to an older straight Camaro (for stability, and/or reducing chances of sub-structure fatique due to age, etc) ?
Thanks in advance!
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Mr Wizzard wrote:

You might also consider some SFCs, even on an older model like yours. (Assuming your sub frame is still in decent condition.)
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And SFC is? Sub Frame, somin-somin? "Channel" ? Please explain, I'd like to learn all of it. I barely ever looked under this car since I bought it in 1990, so I'd like to learn every square inch of it like I know my 96 F-150 that I *do* use as my every day vehicle.

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Mr Wizzard wrote:

Sub-Frame Connector. Ties the front and rear sub-frames together. Between tose and the strut tower brace definite improvements in handling will be noticed.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&q=f+body+Sub-Frame+Connector
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Between
Really? Wow!, this is ALL great news! "Because"..... When I was down there changing the clutch, and looking around I was VERY worried about the looks of ALL that thin sheet metal and I couldn't find the frame, no matter HOW hard I looked. All I saw was frame-like members all made out of sheet metal, and that worried the shit out of me. In FACT, so much so, I didn't EVEN know where to put the floot jack to jack the God damn thing up to even begin the clutch job. So I went to the owners book for jacking instructions, and they said somehting about these 4 spots on the rocker panel. But when I put the floor jack under there with a small block of wood (to simulate the surface of the crank-up jack), the damn rocker panel caved in a little bit. I said SHEESE, what the hell is the deal with this tun-foil car anyways? And this all worried me. But with all these aftermkt frame member parts, I'm here to tell ya, I'm *liking* the sounds of it all! So are these SFC's all weld-in parts? Or are some bolt in ? Also, just where IS the safest to use a floor jack on this car for the following:
1) front: body to go up, wheels to hang. (L or R) 2) front: wheels to go up and push body up (L or R) 3) Rear: body to come up and diff axle to hang. (L or R) 4) Rear: push diff up (Ok to push by shock mount bracket ?)
Thanks for all you guy's help - you rule!

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You should weld on the SFCs. I have a pair I bought months ago from Global West and to this day I'm still looking for a guy who knows how to do the job.. well.
If anyone here lives in the SF Bay Area, do you have a recommendation for a place to get my SFCs welded on?
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If you lived 3000 miles east:
What I could do for your car, would make you happy as a pig in shit. But, look who's doing stuff in car craft, hot rod, popular hot rodding and all the other magazines.
There are tons of shops in California, it's where most of this stuff originated!
Good luck!
Refinish King
wrote in message news:sGYqc.81414>

Global
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No It was never offered on any Camaro or Firebird. It keeps the camber in check when turning. Various aftermarket companies make them or you can fab. one yourself. The idea of it is to create a sort of box frame. Once you have it installed, you'll see what I mean. The work well on a lot of cars, but the front of the Camaro is very "beefy to begin with, so I'm not sure if you'll need it. Try urethane control arm bushings and replace all the steering joint before putting one in. Also, a bad pan-hard bar in the rear will make your car handle poorly.

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All that putting a strut tower brace on a Camaro/Firebird will do is add weight!
That platform is one of the strongest uni-bodies out there.
The panhard bar is for the centering of the rear, so as per NOI's advice, I'd go to all urethane bushings, everywhere if they are available. They will keep the suspension geometry where it was designed to be, not mush up and allow change like ordinary rubber does.
Leave the strut tower braces stay on Fords and Subarus!
Good cars don't need any help!
Respectfully submitted,
Refinish King
PS The camber changes when the strut towers flex inward or outward on hard cornering. You'd leave the camber settings where they are if you fabricated a brace.

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