Ford Taurus 1994 Wagon Rear Camber Bold

My tires on the rear are wearing out on the inside and I have been told that I need to have camber bolts installed. My car if Im correct does not come with them so you have to get an after
market kit to replace the bolts that are there now with camber bolts.
Can anyone tell me where these bolts are on the rear? It sounds like a relatively straight forward job. Albiet perhaps some brut force or blow torch to remove the bolts. I dont know what Im looking for under the car. Can somone show me a picture or web site where I can itentify this. Any other advice would be helpfull.
By the way I would not recomend the ford taurus wagon to anyone. I have had to replace the heads, and transmission to mention big repairs. Not to mention why would they not allow you to adjust the camber on tires.
Regards
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American manufacturers send out vehicles with very limited or no adjustment to alignment every day. They have employees in the factories that they don't trust enough to make sure the bolts are tight, so you get hugh rivets and such. It's a matter of overpaid UAW employees not being good enough at using hand tools to build your car.
I still buy only US made cars because I am an American. But it is getting hard to tell my wife she can't have a Honda or Altima when I read of so many legit problems people have with American cars. I have good luck with them but not many people take the kind of care of vehicles that I do.
Do a search, there is certainly a Taurus website where you can get advice, but you will probably get it here.

that
had
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Scott, Thanks for your response. I have searched and found some info on the net but not specifics. eg. that the camber permanent and that you need an after market kit to replace existing parts to fix. I'm searching out more data.
As far as your opinion on American Cars, While I might agree with you about buying American the problem is that by buying American all you are doing is allowing the American Auto industry, Unions and Management to continue to screw their own people. So on the one hand they say buy American, but with the other they give us the finger once you have bought the car. By continuing to buy American you are only fostering more poorly built cars, there is no motivation to build better cars. For years the common phrase was, it cheap Japanese junk. You don't say that now. I would never buy an American camera for example. ( do we even make one). The Japanese did what car manufactures have never learned. Build it better. Honestly my next car definitely will be a Toyota or some Japanese car. Why should I support the Fat Unions or Fat executives who don't give a darn about building a better car but just making money and relying upon a patriotic customer to buy their rotten cars. In fact they car so little that even when cars kill eg SUV's and tires they hide it until the military finds out, because soldiers where being killed and finally breaks the story. Later discovering that the manufacturers knew all along but felt it was an acceptable loss. The manufacturers are not very patriotic. Why should you be? So I say buy the best (not American). The only thing that will get better cars out of them is hurt them at the bank.
Any way I hope NO ONE response this is not the forum for this. But I suppose some goofy person will. I'm just responding you your email. I'm just looking for technical advice, to keep this junker on the road another year before I buy Japanese. Ford lost me as a customer and I'm sure they could car less, cause if they ve got patriotism why do they need customer satisfaction.
Regards

car.
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news opined in

As a former auto industry employee, (and having about half my family in the car mfg biz) I can sympathize with your statement. Everything you say is true.. to some extent.
But the malaise is far too complicated to go into in a short forum...
The HG and trans problems were NOT due to either Unions or Top Mgmt directly. They were due to "value engineering". Which the Japanese (and Germans) ALSO do.
But if you think that it will all be solved by buying Japanese you may be in for a surprise.
The operative word is REASONABLE value... The Taurus, even with it's Head Gasket and Tranny history is STILL a good deal.
And before you throw too many rocks at Ford, look at the owner satisfaction/reliability ratings for Jaguar, before and after.

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FORD: 1986-97 TAURUS LINCOLN-MERCURY: 1986-97 SABLE
This TSB article is being republished in its entirety to include 1996 and '97 model year vehicles and revise the labor operations.
ISSUE: Premature wear on the inner edges of the rear tires may be caused by rear camber and toe settings that are not within specification.
ACTION: Reset the rear camber and toe to specification. If the camber cannot be set to specification, install a new Rear Suspension Adjustable Camber Kit. Refer to the Instruction Sheet included in the kit for installation details.
The Rear Suspension Adjustable Camber Kit (-5K751-) contains the following components:
Eight (8) Flatwashers Six (6) Tab Washers (Spacers) Four (4) Hex Head Bolts Four (4) Hex Flange Nuts One (1) Instruction Sheet (I.S. 5732 or 6416)
PART NUMBER PART NAME E7DZ-5K751-A Rear Suspension Adjustable Camber Kit (Wagons) E7DZ-5K751-B Rear Suspension Adjustable Camber Kit (Sedans)
OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: NONE
SUPERSEDES: 95-5-6
WARRANTY STATUS: Eligible Under The Provisions Of Bumper To Bumper Warranty Coverage
OPERATION DESCRIPTION TIME 962603A Rear Camber And Toe Check, Install Camber Kit, Set Rear Camber And Toe - Wagons Only 2.8 Hrs. 962603B Rear Camber And Toe Check, Install Camber Kit, Set Rear Camber And Toe - Sedans Only 2.9 Hrs.
DEALER CODING BASIC PART NO. CONDITION CODE 5K751 07
OASIS CODES: 303000, 304000, 306000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Thanks for your response.
I asume that this info if I take it to a ford dealer they will know what Im to order ?
Regards

that
car.
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Considering it is a TSB issued by Ford, with Ford part numbers, you draw the conclusion.

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Could the installation of the kit be a DIY job?

that
car.
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Yes, it is very easy to do.

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By chance do you know the cost of the kit?

told
after
bolts.
a
blow
Any
have
to
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No, don't remember.

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I bought a 94 Taurus wagon 3 months ago and thanks to in part the excellent advice on this board I'm a happy camper. I have a fine mechanic that came with the car, he isn't afraid to suggest ideas, keep on the maintenance, carefully go over any upcoming problem, and luckily work for less than the common ripoff artists.
Sure the VSS needed changing, and the water pump turned out to be making more than noise. I can't stand the Overdrive bullshit, but overall its a decent car even at 120K. Goofy things happen like the wipers stop at the top when finished.
One key was taking care of common problems early, like a worn out key tumbler, some duct tape on the alternator, small brake noises, back door rattles,new shocks in rear.
Its no Lincoln Continental...
wrote:

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