Mobil 1 or Valvoline Synthetic

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I just bought a 1995 Ford Mustang GT with a 5.0L engine at 109,000 miles. The recommended oil weight to use is 10w30. Is Mobil 1 or Valvoline Synthetic the best? Synthetic is obviously better than
conventional. For me, it's just a question of whether to use Mobil 1 or Valvoline.
Thanks, BTJustice
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Buford T. Justice opined in berlin.de:

If you plan to change it at under 4000 miles, it wont matter.
If you typically run the car for MORE than 20 minutes per start and over highway a lot AND plan extended changes... Mobil 1
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Why do you think synthetic is "obviously" better? Because it costs more?

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Because it is cleaner, proficient, flows more smoothly when hot, has a higher heat point, flows in extreme cold, etc. just to name a few.
BTJustice
----- Original Message ----- From: Richard and Gwen Sent: 4/7/2004 10:27 PM

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addressing your question between mobil 1 or valvoline synthetic. bottom line, it really won't make much difference. each will have their own little bit of additives, but the bulk of the oil is made up of ester base. mobile 1 has the longest track record.
either should perform quite well to your satisfaction.
~ curtis
knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
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http://www.synthetic-oil-tech.com/d.cgi/1102880/articles/api_comparative_motor_oil_testing.htm
----- Original Message ----- From: Buford T. Justice Sent: 4/7/2004 9:09 PM

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Hey, you left off a very important test...the sucker index. Recent studies have shown that those who use Scamsoil consistently rate the highest on this index. They also tend to by things like the "Tornado" and the "vegematic"
--
R. J. Talley
Teacher/James Madison Fellow
  Click to see the full signature.
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I have had very good experience with Mobil 1 and every other mobil synthetic lube i have ever used. However i have never used Valvaline. I am sure it is quality, i meen it is a top name brand. However from ecperience may i suggest AMSOil? I rate them equal to Mobil 1.
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How about a non-biased link?

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Supply one.
BTJustice
----- Original Message ----- From: Robert A. Matern Sent: 4/13/2004 6:45 PM

http://www.synthetic-oil-tech.com/d.cgi/1102880/articles/api_comparative_motor_oil_testing.htm
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You're the one making the argument... YOU do it!
Otherwise, wise folks ignore posts like this as thinly veiled advertising...

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You weirdo. I see no tests like the one I linked to anywhere else. Therefore, I asked you to provide one. So provide one or shut up.
I choose Valvoline MaxLife Synthetic 10w30 anyway.
BTJustice
----- Original Message ----- From: Robert A. Matern Sent: 4/20/2004 3:18 PM

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So Rude... I'm thinking you're a troll now...
I had no trouble finding links with a Google search... though I must admit, most are from some manufacturer or other! Pretty hard to find unbiased testing of any kind... here's one that looked good:
http://neptune.spacebears.com/cars/stories/oil-life.html AMSoil Test in Progress http://neptune.spacebears.com/cars/stories/mobil1.html Mobil 1 18,000 mile test
I just don't want one of those "reclassified" oils that isn't actually a true synthetic at all, qualifying for the name only because the definition was changed. Which makes me wonder if Valvoline is one of those...?

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hi robert - i gave up on trying to say something useful on this subject after my last post, because most people are going to say that the person who is saying something about it - one way or the other is biased.
i figure that anybody who does the lawn mower test with their own unit will definitely see a different between synthetic and mineral base - regardless of brand.
i will shed some light on mobil one since there doesn't seem to be giving credit where credit should be due.
first, mobil one was developed back in the early 60's and was discovered by accident. they brought in to the lab where they use to do a 392 hour dynamic engine oil test. the purpose of this test is to run the engine for 392 hours solid, then the oil drained, and sent to the lab for analysis. the synthetic oil sat there behind the door for a couple of years and when the lab boys ran out of oil to test, they ask about this stuff that had been sitting there. there was a assigned number on the box. well, they put the oil in and did the test. when they went to drain the oil out, it still looked as clean as when they put it in, so they poured it back into the engine and ran the test again. after the second time, they did drain it and sent it to the lab with a note of wanting to know what kind of oil it was. and that's how it came to be.
there were a lot of problems with ester based oils. the amount of type of additives to put it to make it compatible with mineral oil based oils. people don't realize what all is put into engine oil. for example - seal sweller. that's right. it has to be a certain amount to cause the seal to swell at the same given rate the parts are shrinking from wear. if you didn't, you was leak more and more oil as the engine got more wear on it. and that is just one of many. anti foam agents is another, sure don't want to pump oil around in an engine with air bubbles in it. after they achieved the final balance it hit the market.
people were highly skeptical of an oil that was advertised that it could go 25,000 miles without changing. and it was 5 dollars a quart back then. could change a lot of mineral based oil for 5 dollars a quart.
and then everyone people wrote in about what they put the oil through. one person owned an airline company and they would send off their oil samples of their engines to find out when the oil was so contaminated that it needed to be changed and also based on the metal makeup what kind of engine trouble to expect. so, they started to send in the synthetic oil into the lab. the only thing they changed with the oil filters. it was over 100k miles on the oil before the lab said change it and with no sign of engine part failure. the lab company was independent and had no way of knowing what this particular product was.
another person did basically the same thing and at the 100,000 mark, and when they mike the parts, they were still within original factory specs.
in the late 1960's. the daytona 500 made news. because of the track temp being around 180 to 200 degrees and the big block race engine was stuck next to the heat of the exhaust of the car in front of it - that after the race, when they drop the oil plug, no oil would come out. they would drop the pan - take a pocket knife and literally cut the oil out of the pan, rolled into a ball and could bounce it on the floor. total oil breakdown. the ones that had ran mobile one, not only did the oil run out of the pan, but when they tore the engine down, they found that it still have the cross hatch pattern in the cylinder walls. these stories were carried by popular science and popular mechanics at the time.
look how long it took for the other brands to finally come out with their own synthetics and of course, the name of the game is to knock down the leader. in this case - mobile one.
but they are all the same base makeup, just as all the oil companies use mineral based oil for their regular oil.
so, which one is best? i'm not going to side up with one of the other.
but, i will tell you this much. synthetic oil is not suited for extreme high pressure, extreme demand applications, such as use in mining operations. when you have a 7,000 dollar pump the galls up because of the type of oil being used, it gets expensive fast. mineral based oil clearly is the better choice.
but, for light pressure, high temps, hostile environment applications, such as in autos and trucks, they appear to be the best choice, but it depends again and the person's driving habits as to whether or not it would be in their best interest to use them.
i hope this will shed some light on the subject.
~ curtis
knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional "Many more men die with prostate cancer that of it. Growing old is invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so."
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I just got off the phone with Valvoline (1-800-TEAM-VAL). Valvoline Synthetic is PAO based and Group III & IV. I guess I will use Valvoline since I have always used hteir products and all can be found at both Wal-Mart & AutoZone.
BTJustice
----- Original Message ----- From: Buford T. Justice Sent: 4/7/2004 9:09 PM

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They also say it is good for 7500 miles, but I will change mine every 5000 miles.
BTJustice
----- Original Message ----- From: Buford T. Justice Sent: 4/8/2004 10:14 AM

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"Buford T. Justice" wrote:

No one addressed the "109,000 miles" factor. Seems to recall some posts about flushing or the Synthetic acting to loosen deposits and having a negative result.
Frank
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in responce to 'F.H." <disc" yes synthetics do have very high abilities to clean and can negativly effect a high milage engine. You may also notice that most manufaturers recommend using conventioal oil untill the break in point then switching to synthetic for the rest of the engine life. This is usually 3000-5000 for a gas burner and 15,000 - 25,000 for a diesel. I believe they even state that the use of synthetic may effect the correct break in of an an engine when new because it lubs to well.
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No one addressed the "109,000 miles" factor. Seems to recall some posts about flushing or the Synthetic acting to loosen deposits and having a negative result. Frank ------------------------------
i will address this part. i've not had any trouble on engines that were low miles (under 30,000) but i did convert a 5.0 at 55,000 miles to synthetic oil. it was my dad's car and he changes oil when the moon turns blue. he bought the car new and it had a few oil changes. i say few, because he changed the break in oil around the 8,000 mile mark.
anyway, on with the story, all went well with the engine until the 115,000 mile mark. came up to a stop light, the oil light started to flicker. 10 miles later the oil light was bright red, but no engine knocking. finally ended up taking the oil pan off of it only to find the sludge that had built up in the first 50,000 miles had dried out and formed hard crystals. looked some something like large coffee grinds and rock hard. stopped up the sump. cleaned it all up and everything was fine for 4,000 more miles, when the same thing happened. drop pan, same thing. concluded that the synthetic oil draws the oil out of the sludge leaving the carbon crystals. so, my recommendation, if you have a sludged up engine, keep mineral based oil in it and enjoy the engine, unless you want engine troubles down the road later.
~ curtis
knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
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X-No-Archive: Yes Hi Palmer, You are the first person that really know what going on with this synthetic buloney. I have seen these deposits due to the break in oil being mineral. The zeolites also make these clusters and usually they attack the # 1 main journal. Usually clogging the passage and galling the first and second cyl. rod bearings. I've seen as many as 30 engines a year back in the 80's. 1 sure cure was to change that oil filter ever 3k . A fresh filter will catch most of the damaging particles before the filter is so full it bypass's full time.
BeeVee

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