Mobil 1 or Valvoline Synthetic

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I've used M1 for many/many years in both my truck and car. I use a Wix oil filter and change it at 3K intervals and change the oil at the 4th filter change. (recycle the old filters and oil) I expect V is ok too, but when I started using syn, it was the only choice available that I could afford.
Dave S(Texas)
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I have used Mobil 1 in my 2000 Honda Civic since the first break in oil change. I change it every 7,000 miles. Use a Mobil 1 filter or K&N filter too. I plan on having this car beyond the 200K mark. It is an expensive old change, but I feel confident after 80K miles, it is the oil for me. I drive over 32K a year. Craig
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I ran an 88 Bronco II to over 207K using Mobil 1... it died because the frame, brake calipers, power steering, and other critical components rusted beyond repair. The engine still ran great!

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So, you basically wasted the extra money spent on the synthetic oil.

a
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Great observation! Using a very expensive, superior lubricant instead of an adequate but much less expensive alternative has zero benefit if the engine outlasts the basic vehicle by 3x4 times. Using modern $.84/qt oil will allow most modern engines to exceed the quarter million mile point with ease and leave extra cash for the important things in life. 300,000 miles divided by 5000 mile change interval is 60 oil changes. 60 changes times 5 quarts is 300 quarts. $4 vs $.84 is $3.16 times 300 is ~$1000 to be spent on whatever pleases. No one blows an engine (due to lack of lubrication) while using API certified oil that has been changed regularly and kept up to level. Stan K. Richard and Gwen wrote:

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No other engine of mine has ever gone over 150K, except for the 69 VW Bug I had long ago... it was over 300K when I sold it, still running great.
Even with that, I'd agree - except for the hard use that Bronco II saw over its life. Offroad use in the north maine woods, use by a deputy fire chief for 8 years, and much towing. I don't believe it would have gotten near 200K without an extra tough lubricant. What I really need is something to make the rest of the truck last as well!

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32K
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No one blows an engine (due to lack of lubrication) while using API certified oil that has been changed regularly and kept up to level. -------------------
i will address stan's comments.
i have studied oils since 1961, and have taught lubrication at automotive and industrial businesses. the catch phrase is changing oil regularly. there are so many variables in this dept.
for example - on mineral based oil, the API classification is based on the temp. of 180 degrees in order to come up with it's standards. but the society of automotive engineering states that for every 20 degree rise in the base line, will cut the life of the oil by 50%. so, if one was to put this oil in the family station wagon, pack it full of kids, and people plus luggage, add a heavy trailer to drag down the road, turn on the a/c, and head for the mountains on a hot summer day. what is the life of the oil? could be over in less than 2,000 miles. now, if someone was into abusing the engine, then many of the properties of the oil have changed and may not offer the protection as fresh oil.
i could go into synthetic oils, but let me say this since it is coming upon the growing season. take your old trusty lawn mower out, chank it up and made some passes and push the mower to the choking point, but don't let it die. notice where this point is. then, if you want. change the oil with fresh mineral based oil and do the same thing. after you are satisfied where that choke point is, then put in synthetic oil in. (doesn't make any difference in brands) and go cut the same lawn and notice where the choke point is. remember, you haven't done anything to the mower, just change oil. and if you see any improvement on a 3 1/2 hp engine, think what you would see if you have a 150hp engine. then write back to the newsgroup and tell what you found out. and tell how slow the synthetic oil gets dark. then you decide whether or not it's worth the difference.
it's not me telling. people say put up or shut up. well, there's the challenge and it's your mower, your lawn so how can it be fixed?
you will notice a difference, but you will be surprised of how much.
knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
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I use synthetics because I don't want to worry about oil breakdown..ever. I change oil and filter at 5000 miles. My driving is 99% freeway done in 45 minute stints. I could change at 3500 miles and would if I had the time. However, I don't and I need to be able to run a bit longer between changes. My experience has been that synthetics work better in extremes of heat and cold, seem to have greater detergent qualities and never turn black between changes.
--
R. J. Talley
Teacher/James Madison Fellow
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I think lawn mowers really last a long time, even with severe duty. I replace the cheap oil in my mowers every 4-5 years or so, if I remember. The oldest is a Sears lawn tractor with a Briggs and Stratton 10 HP. I bought it used in 1976 and it still is in use in Texas where we mow frequently, especially during the very hot summers. I think that users of synthetic oil vs mineral oil are basically so risk averse that they "feel" that anything is better than the dreaded engine failure. They probably are the same people who make the selling of extended warranties so profitable. API certified oils are more than good enough for 99% of us. Save your hard earned cash! Stan K. c palmer wrote:

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My '86 Lincoln Mark VII has 188k miles( many miles of towing) and 18 years with cheap oil, and my '92 Mercury Grand Marquis has 203K miles with cheap oil and rarely needs additional oil between changes. I have no doubt both engines will far outlast the usefulness of the interior/exterior and other running gear of the vehicles. As long as oil changes are done regularly (~5000 miles) and the oil level is kept up, engines will outlast the rest of the car every time. Main cause for engine lubrication failure is low/no oil or extending intervals so long that some tiny oil passages get clogged. People don't check. Stan K. Robert A. Matern wrote:

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