Platinum Plugs in 2.3L Ranger

I'm having my mechanic do the 75K maintence on my 96 Ranger. He calls back and says that the service indicates the use of platinum plugs. I give him
the ok after grumbling about the price(8 motocraft plugs at $12.95 each).
Now, I remember that the plugs were changed at 60k miles with standard copper plugs. I should have told him to put standard plugs in because I planned to have another tune up at 90K.
What would be the recommended tune-up interval now with platinum plugs? With Platinum plugs, can I skip the tune-up at 90K?
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60,000 miles.
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clare wrote:

60,000 or 100,000? All the Fords I own with Platinum plugs have 100,000 mile replacement intervals under normal service or 60,000 miles under special service condition (for spark plugs the special serivce condition that requires the shorther interval is any service that involves a lot of idling or low speed driving like a taxi or a delivery vehicle).
In the case of my 1997 Expedition I waited the entire 1000,000 miles before having the plugs replaced. I saved the old plugs. They looked perfect, with a gap only slightly wider than the new plugs. I keep gas mileage records and there was no change in gas mileage attributable to changing the plugs (aka, the fuel mileage was the same before and after the plug change). For my 2003 Expedtion I had the original plugs changed at 75,000 miles. I had the truck in for other service at that time and figured I'd probably only change the plugs once in the time I planned to own it, so 75,000 miles was as good time as any for theone plug change. As was the case for the 1997 Expedition, the old plugs looked almost perfect and replacing them was not necessary and had no effects on performance.
Ed
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I agree with your post. I have a '93 ranger (4.0L) with ~128K miles on the original plugs. They were supposed to be good for at least 100k. To this day the engine runs fine and I get around 22-24 mpg.
Ed White wrote:

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Marc wrote:

I'll bet ford would love to hear about a truck that went a million miles on a set of plugs .... ;)
Bob

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Generally, 98% of the American/Canadian vehicles see "special service conditions". Up untill the last few years, platinum plug change intervals in Canada were recommended at 100,000km (which is 60,000 miles). Usually the plugs were still good at that interval, but impossible to remove by 160,000km.

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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message

I think you need to read the severe service description carefully before you say 98% of drivers see severe service. This is definitely not the case for Fords. Ford has tried to clarify this in more recent warranty guides, but the oil change establishment keeps hammering the 3000 mile oil change line. Who can blame them - if people only changed their oil when it really needed changing, the oil change business would be cut almost in half.
Ford breaks down "special service conditions" into multiple categories with different schedules for each. For instance for my 2003 Expedition, they have the following categories:
* Normal Conditions - according to Ford this is most owners (not 2% as you claim - see below) * Towing - Towing a trailer or using a camper or car-top carrier * Extensive idling and/or driving at low speeds - Extensive idling and/or low-speed driving for long distances as in heavy commercial use such as delivery, taxi, patrol car or livery * Operating in Dusty Conditions - Operating in dusty conditions such as unpaved or dusty roads * Off-Road Operations - Off-road operation
The only one of these conditions that requires more frequent spark plug changes is "Extensive idling and/or driving at low speeds." Anything but "normal conditions" does require more frequent oil changes (3000 miles), but most car owners aren't regularly doing any of those special service things (Ford says special service schedules do not apply "If you only occasionally operate your vehicle under these conditions"). The "Extensive idling and/or driving at low speeds" condition is not the same as in town driving - they specifically mention delivery, taxi, patrol car or livery service in connection with this condition, not in town driving.
The following is from my Ford warranty guide:
Which Maintenance Schedule Should You Follow?
Normal Schedule
The Normal Schedule applies to those who operate their vehicle under typical, everyday driving conditions. This maintenance frequency represented in this schedule typifies what the vast majority of vehicle operators will require. The listed services should be performed at specified mileage intervals. Items listed in italic type are additional services that only the noted vehicles require.
Special Operating Conditions
If you operate your Ford/Lincoln/Mercury primarily in one of the more demanding "Special Operating Conditions" listed below, you will need to have some items maintained more frequently, see page 36. , it is not necessary to perform the additional maintenance. For specific recommendations, see your dealership service advisor or qualified service professional. These special operating conditions are:
. Towing or carrying heavy loads . Extensive idling and/or driving at low-speeds for long distances . Driving in dusty conditions . Off-road operation . Use of E85 fuel 50% of the time or greater (flex fuel vehicles only)
Exceptions
In addition, there are several exceptions to the Normal Schedule for specific vehicles or special applications on page 33. These exceptions are: . Natural Gas and Propane Vehicles - fuel tank intervals . Class A Motorhome/E-550 - change the brake fluid and automatic transmission fluid . Normal vehicle axle - maintenance and lubrication . Police and Taxi vehicle axles - maintenance and lubrication . Engine oil and Yellow coolant - time and mileage based interval
If you have any questions about your driving conditions, or for further clarification, please see your dealer.

Never had a problem removing the OEM plugs (even after 7 years). Unfortunately I have had problems replacing plugs that were previously replaced. Seems like a lot of plug changers (as opposed to professional mechanics) don't understand how to properly replace plugs. I think the risk associated with semi-skilled labor replacing plugs is far higher then the risk of the OEM plugs freezing in place. Paying to have unnecessary maintenance done poorly is the height of foolishness.
Ed
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On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 11:01:19 -0400, "C. E. White"

How about 60 miles of gridlock? and 85-90F weather?
Regardless, my point is that at 100,000 km, or 60,000 miles, you still have a chance of getting ALL the plugs out without braking one. At 160,000Km, or 100,000 miles, that likelihood decreases substantially. If you are not going to change them at 60,000 miles, at least pull them and take a look. With as difficult as a LOT of plugs are to get at these days, it seems a bit foolish to put them back in without changing them???

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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message

Hard on oil maybe but definitely not hard on spark plugs. And if your cooling system is in good condition, it is not even particularly hard on oil. I've only ever had one car with an oil temperature gauge (as opposed to an oil pressure gauge which it also had) and about the only thing that caused a significant rise in oil temperature was sustained high speed driving (excess of 85 mph for more than 10 minutes and the oil temperature would rise noticeably). Puttering around in rush hour traffic had almost no effect on the oil temperature. If anything it was lower than highway driving (but then the car did not have an oil cooler, at least in the US, the European model did).

Have you actually had any trouble removing manufacturer installed plugs - ever? I haven't - ever - in over 37 years of owning and working on cars. I agree that it makes no sense to reinstall plugs once you have taken them out, but why pull the plugs out in the first place before you reach the recommended mileage for replacement? If you have platinum plugs and no symptoms, what are you looking for? If you have a miss, your PCM will detect it (most are very sensitive - I learned this the hard way). Platinum plugs, unleaded fuel, and high power ignition systems have made spark plugs almost bullet proof. Yanking them out for a look see seems like a bad idea. You are asking for trouble in my opinion. By all means if you are engaging in an activity the manufacturer deems as stressful for the plugs, then replace them at the 60K interval. But just doing it for no reason except you want to see what they look like seems like a good way to waste time and/or money.
Ed
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On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 02:37:43 GMT, "C. E. White"

Yes I have, I have been a licenced mechanic since 1971 and have seen LOTS of broken off plugs, as well as stripped heads, from removing manufacturer installed plugs, as well as professionally installed replacement plugs.

fail and have to do a retest, I generally check the vehicle over before etesting. Change oil, check/change filters (fuel and air, as well as oil) and check the ignition system (at least every second e-test). A compression or cyl leakdown test never hurt either - I run my vehicles for 300,000KM or more.

And know when it's time to start thinking about replacing the vehicle BEFORE it lets me down, yet get maximum service out of it before replacement.

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