125K, original plugs

Mom's '93 GP 3.1L has about 125,000 miles and I've concluded it still has the original plugs, wires, etc. Took her on a long trip yesterday and in overdrive going up a viable
hill it would begin to 'cut out' here & there. Thought it was the tranny slippping at first, but figured that since the car just putts around a very small town, it's unlikely that OD is going out (right?) Anyway, I'm considering replacing the plugs & wires myself, thus saving her probably $100+ compared to having the dealership do it, but I'm TERRIFIED of something going wrong "on Mom's car" and having it turn into a big fiasco; namely 13 year old plugs breaking/siezing in the heads. Is there a high likelihood of that happening, or would it be a pretty routine deal and I'm just being paranoid?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Re: the plugs, make sure the engine is dead cold if it has aluminum heads.

-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Agreed, cold engine will prevent damage. Also, learn how to rotate the engine forward and since they are original be sure to have new wires before beginning. Plug wire pliers will aid in removing usually stuck factory wires.
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not doubting you about changing plugs only when engine is cold, but why does it make a difference?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Aluminum heads expand greatly with heat and the plug hole threads can be damaged removing the plugs.

-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's also so you don't burn your hands while working on the car.
I have seen threads stripping even from a cold motor with aluminium heads. If they have been in there a long time they could be quite stuck and take threads with them. DON'T use a long bar, DON'T use ANY air tool to aid in removing the plug (saw what happens when you do that), DO use a 3/8" ratchet. If the plug just won't break loose, try warming the motor up a little bit or perhaps a little penetrating oil.
Personally I have never had a plug stuck so bad it couldn't be removed with a 3/8" ratchet and some slight muscle.
Not sure what everyone else does, but I always put silver anti-seize on the plugs before reinserting.
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I always use anti-sieze on plugs as well, for that reason (to facilitate later removal) but the copper-looking stuff (not even familiar with silver(?). Still on the fence about changing plugs myself, since "I don't want no problems." If it was anyone elses' car other than my mom, I wouldn't be afraid of it at all. Maybe it's akin to the way surgeons aren't supposed to operate on relatives, like they'll choke LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It sounds more like a plud fuel filter if it is cutting out on heavy loads.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.