62 m.p.g. could be standard for 2025

62 m.p.g. could be standard for 2025 http://tinyurl.com/286ub8w
WASHINGTON -- Cars and trucks averaging 62 m.p.g.? Seems extraordinary now, but the government suggested Friday that automakers could be
required to build new lineups by 2025 that make today's high-mileage hybrids seem conventional and turn gas guzzlers into relics of the past.
It's all included in potential efficiency ranges the government is considering for new cars and trucks starting in 2017.
By a decade and a half from now, in 2025, a carmaker's fleet of new vehicles may need to meet a standard somewhere from 47 m.p.g. to 62 m.p.g., the Transportation Department and Environmental Protection Agency said.
Those mileage gains would be the equivalent of an annual decrease in carbon dioxide emissions per mile of 3% to 6%. Industry is watching closely
The new standards, while several years away, are closely watched by the auto industry as it develops future vehicles and environmental groups try to curb oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
President Barack Obama has pushed for tougher fuel efficiency standards, and new rules could take on added significance if Congress is unable to pass energy legislation capping greenhouse gases blamed for global warming.
The government envisions gas-electric hybrids making up about half the lineup of new vehicles under the most-aggressive standards, while electrics and plug-ins would make up about 10% of the fleet.
After little progress during the past three decades, rules adopted this year will lift the new vehicle fleet average to 35.5 m.p.g. by 2016, an increase of more than 40% over current standards.
The administration's release on Friday of a technical analysis started the work on mileage standards for the 2017-25 model years.
The government intends to issue a proposal in September 2011 and a final rule by late July 2012.
Friday's "notice of intent" provides an overview of the possible standards, describes the technologies that would be needed to achieve the goals and seeks feedback from the public.
The two federal agencies plan to issue a second notice by Nov. 30 with an updated analysis of potential efficiency targets.
Environmentalists have sought requirements of at least 60 m.p.g. by 2025, arguing that more gas-electric hybrids, electric vehicles and cars and trucks with improved internal combustion engines and reduced weight could dramatically alter the cars and trucks Americans drive.
"The auto industry has 15 years to meet these new standards -- that's plenty of time to use innovation and technology to reach 60 m.p.g.," said Brendan Bell of the Union of Concerned Scientists' clean-vehicles program.
Automakers, who plan their vehicle offerings years in advance, cautioned that pushing gas mileage standards up too quickly could force them to raise prices beyond the reach of many consumers.
Dave McCurdy, head of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents General Motors, Ford, Toyota and others, said many of the assumptions "are based on very preliminary and incomplete data at this point and inevitably will change as more information is brought to the process."
The Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, whose members include Nissan, Honda and others, said the regulations need to balance issues such as environmental objectives, costs and meeting the needs of customers.
The documents estimate that the toughest efficiency standards under consideration would add up to $3,500 to the price of each vehicle. But under that scenario, owners would recoup their investment in three to four years and save up to $7,400 over the vehicle's lifetime.
--
Service Guarantees Citizenship

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 07:29:14 -0400, Jim_Higgins

Along with a maximum speed on all Interstate highways of 25 MPH, and 15 on non-limited access highways.
BTW, both Brigs & Stratton and Techumsa support this initiative, and are working on a new line of single cylinder lawn-mower engines to be used in new cars.
As well, car makers are now considering cars made of recycled beer cans, tires made of wood and iron (for minimal rolling resistance) and solid foam interiors for crash protection, with small cutouts for driver visibility. There appears to be no plans for passenger visibility, and as well electronic controls will prevent these vehicles from being driven unless there are at least four adults in them.
In further news King Obama I has announced that he has named his son to follow him to the throne.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

might as well make it 200 mpg. the govt doesn't have to design build or buy them. just think a 2 passenger car will use exotic materials expensive batteries super tires and cost about 75k or more and sell about 2k a year, how far away is the horse farm and buggy manfacturer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does BO(ZO) wife know he has a son somewhere? What is the bastards name? ;)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 5:29 AM, Jim_Higgins wrote:

Why wait? Ask your representatives why they can't get the Tata Nano that gets well over 50 mpg, Euro crash rated and sells between $2500 and $4300...
No missing zeros in above, it is green in the consumers pocket and at that price should negate the needs for auto loans.
We need to stop propping up a dead Detroit business model.
--
Is government working for you, or are you working for the government?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can see the headlines now, "Gas prices hit a record high in the US of $12.59 in September 2017."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.