[article] Clunkers and the Trailer Trash

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Great article on the Cash for Clunkers and how it won't help any of the automakers in the long run...
http://blogs.edmunds.com/straightline/2009/08/clunkers-and-the-trailer-trash.html

This semi-regular column is written (in his own blood) by an automotive sage and noted malcontent, known as The Mechanic. Mercilessly beaten as a child with rolled-up back issues of old car magazines, our free-spoken hero developed a unique "for your own good" take on cars and the auto industry, along with an unfortunate habit of setting himself ablaze. Later, after a distinguished career as an automotive journalist and magazine editor, he cast off the reins of his musty oppressors, carved out his superego with a plastic spork and became The Mechanic.
Cash for Clunkers officially ended exactly one minute ago. Sad. A real shame. Now what is America's trailer trash going to do? Where's their next handout going to come from? Meth isn't getting any cheaper, ya know. Not even in this down market. Obama better get busy figuring out another way to give away my tax dollars.
Oh wait, that's right, his health care system will supply the great unwashed with plenty of my hard-earned money. Something to look forward to.
One good thing about Cash for Clunkers is how quickly it rid the world of Pontiacs. The brand just had its best few months in years. It's practically sold out of the very same crapmobiles it couldn't give away before Obama made Bubba's rusting lawn art worth $4,500.
What's that? You need a Pontiac G5 for target practice (basically the only thing it's good for), well you're out of luck. Some big-bellied, chain-smoker with beer on his breath and food stamps in his pocket just traded in his 1992 Bonneville SSEi on the last one. He's a guest on The Jerry Springer Show tonight and wanted to arrive in style.
Fact is, Pontiac's popularity with the Cash for Clunkers crowd shouldn't surprise. GM's excitement division had been catering to that upscale demographic for decades, and I called them on it back in February in a column titled "Pontiac and the Trailer Trash." Once again I am right. I'm always right.
Whatever. The world is finally scrubbed clean of the G3, the G5 and the G6, if not the chemical toilet crowd that they so strongly appeal to. I think we can all agree that this is a good thing.
By the way, the same Big Mac for breakfast, lunch and dinner detail also bought Chrysler out of Calibers. These people define stupid.
But Detroit's free all-you-can-eat buffet is now closed. And let's face it: The sneeze guard on the sucker was never really up to code.
And now the real fight begins. The New GM, Ford, Fiat and the rest of them are going to have to do it on their own again without the help of Obama's ATM and the sweat off of my hairy back. They're going to need to sell cars people want, to people who can actually afford to pay for them.
It's called the free market. Remember that? It's the same environment that our beloved domestic automakers failed to feed into for the past 35 years. Personally, I think it's nice to have it back. Sink or swim, people, sink or swim. It's the American way, and this is Detroit's last chance to stay above the surface and find its stroke. Fritz, Lutz, Sergio and Mulally better suit up 'cause they're going in the deep end. (Hey, Sergio, this ain't the Riviera. No Speedos, please.)
Considering we'd all like (need) those billions in TARP funds repaid, let's hope they can at least dog paddle this time.
-- The Mechanic, Contributor
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http://blogs.edmunds.com/straightline/2009/08/clunkers-and-the-trailer-trash.html No one is going to accuse BO (Bailout Obama) of being smart, ditto congress and the senate for not pulling out the horns. All BO knows how to do is talk a lot and debt-bailout spend.
September is bound to be a bad month for auto sales. BO debt-spending for clunkers might have just broght in a few would be buyers in September into August, and September buyers are not going to pay $5000 more because it is September.
Which means Government Motors will be out of cash by December.
I wonder how many GM & Chrylsers got traded in on some other brand. Bet the brand demographics shift is bad news for GM.
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Bob the Builder wrote:

http://blogs.edmunds.com/straightline/2009/08/clunkers-and-the-trailer-trash.html
Countries outside the US don't play by the same (idiotic) rules of the American 'free-market'. That's the problem. When America learns to restrict foreign imports, as other countries do, "Made in America" (..by Americans ..using American resources ..etc) will enable Detroit to thrive once again. Some will argue that exports are key, but that is a fallacy - it might be meaningful for government - but not for home-grown industries serving home-grown customers. Some sort of protectionism is the only way to get out of this mess.
Paul
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Protection from government interference would help considerably.
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wrote in message

So bang on!!! Nifty way to put it.
Too bad DC, Ottawa, CAW/UAW politics no longer believe in freedom of choice and individual prosperity. Which is really what this recession/depression is. Too much parasitical baggage on the producers in these countries to foster a health economy. It is also why this recession is far from over, it may just be beginning. It may take decades for recovery. In 1982 it took 8 years for many businesses just to recover. And by most accounts, this time is at least as bad as 1982.
Too bad we could not opt out of the corporate welfare and frivolous debt-spending portions of our income taxes. It is clear the people no longer control government as few really support what is going on. We are indeed enslaving ourselves and our offspring to a lifetime of taxation enslavement for corruption.
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Protectionism will not work. Lets say we closed our borders to imported autos and parts. The next thing is the prices of autos would then double or triple maybe more.
Then far fewer people would buy them, fewer would be built and fewer would drive. Driving would become so costly, a large segment of the population will drive a whole lot less and maybe not even drive at all. The reduction in driving, means less government revenue as it is a major source of such. They will even raise state/provincial taxes just to compensate for the loss of revenue.
All that is left is a grossly inefficient Marxist and failing industry, pretty much what you have today minus the protectionism. Protectionism isn't going to fix Detroit auto, good honest no bullshit management will. Inbreed, dysfunctional and greedy corrupt corporations like GM sucking on the taxpayers for their existence just makes us all poorer and contributes to the recession/depression. And for many, the reduction in monthly net income for bailout corruption will reduce what we can spend on autos in the future.
Protectionism and bailouts are not the answer. The industry needs to quick talking bullshit, and earnestly become efficient and responsive to their customers needs. GM is part of the problem, not the solution. GM is just another parasite on the taxpayers ass at this point.
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On Sun, 30 Aug 2009 10:22:25 -0600, Canuck57 wrote: <snip>

I agree that closing our borders would be problematic, bit imo a partial closing would be a good thing - like Japan, which restricts foreign imports of motor vehicles somewhat - if only to send a msg to Japan, and others, to create "fair trade".

Agreed.
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Japan does not restrict imports, their people don't want to buy it. Huge difference.

Lets hope the message sinks in, the sooner it sinks in the less it will cost us. But even if GM quality became better, I still will not patronize them for taxing people for corporations. It is unforgivable in my books.
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On Sun, 30 Aug 2009 16:39:01 -0600, Canuck57 wrote:

Italy, for example, has limited imports of Japanese autos to 2,000 units annually. France re- stricts Japanese imports to 3 percent of its domestic market, while Great Britain allows no more than 10 percent of total automobile sales to go to the Japanese.4 Furthermore, over thirty countries now impose domestic content requirements on their automobile industries--among them Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and South Korea.5 -- end quote --
If Italy, France and Britain can do it - so can we.
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So do we stop importing those Canadian built cars? Do we kick out all the assembly plants of non US companies and put those workers on the unemployment roles?
Whatever the answer is, it certainly won't be simple.
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On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 17:02:15 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'm in Canada !
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wrote in message

Of course it isn't simple, but why not at least make it fair? The Japanese barley let any American car into the country. Why not make it even? For every car imported from Japan to America, they must take one of ours. Same with all countries. What is wrong with that?
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wrote in message

It is bu11sh1t protectionism. There would be a shortage of Japanese and a glut of worthless GM rust with higher costs to the consumer.
Besides, half you clowns don't know most "Japanese" cars are made in Canada and the US and view them as imports, LOL. Union ignorance talk.
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First, the population difference. Next, what do we ship them? Fords from Mexico? Buicks from Canada? Hyundai or BMW from the US?
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wrote in message

Do you honestly think there is a difference between USA manufacturing and Canadian? Both countries have been partners in auto manufacturing since the beginning. Perhaps if the trade laws were more fair, Ford wouldn't need to build vehicles in Mexico.
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Depends on the degree of protectionism you want. Some local tree tappers complain about cheap maple syrup coming from Canada. But you did not answer the other questions.
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wrote in message

We're talking about autos here, not syrup.

Because I found them to be pointless. Why is it that people like you think it's A-OK to buy a Hyundai built in Korea, or a Toyota built in Japan, but piss on GM, or Ford for building a car in Mexico? Sorry Ed, you can't have your cake, and eat it too.
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No, it is not pointless. I'm talking about Hyundai built in the USA. By American workers Evidently you don't have the answers so you evade the question.
Personally, I'd like to see GM success on their own merits. They have to build better cars than the piece of crap deteriorating in my driveway though. If they do, I'll buy another one. I happen to like the styling of a couple of models. In fact, I think GM builds great cars if you trade them in after about 30,000 miles.
Back to your original question You stated: For every car imported from Japan to America, they must take one

Then I asked for clarification on what qualifies as an American car to export.

You evaded that portion of the question. I've got may cake, you have either a reading comprehension problem or fear of answering. Please, give your definition of "ours" in your trade example.
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wrote in message

Bullshit. Anyone with a brain in there head can get many more then 30,000 miles out of any vehicle.

Why are you being an ass? Hyundai isn't an American company, and I assume you know that. It's damned Korean. Obviously when I said a car for a car, I meant an American built American car (GM, Ford), for a Japanese built Japanese car (Toyota, Honda). What's so difficult to understand? I believe you are trying the bullshit line "my Hyundai is made in America (which, many aren't), so it's American", and I don't buy that. The company who built that car is Foreign. GM, and Ford are not. Buying a Hyundai is helping Korea, not North America.
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I've posted the history of my 2001 Buick Lesabre. Yes, it has many more miles, but has had numerous repairs. Many of the components are not very durable. You should not have to hold a switch in the "on" position by jamming it with a toothpick or the little used heating element in the seat should not need replacing for $672 the second winter (over the 36k mile warranty, but less than 2 years) and on and on. I should have dumped it early on instead of replacing the transmission, propping windows closed with wood stick. As I said, great car for low miles. I really wish I could drive it to work, but the climate system is stuck, hot on driver's side, cold on passenger's side year round. If the mpg qualified it for the government handout, it would be gone

So you are still evading the question. Do we ship a Ford from Mexico or a Buick from Canada? My Hyundai (61,000 perfect miles) did employ American workers to assemble it with 25% US made parts . Protectionism and the one for one swap is no different for cars than for maple syrup from Canada that is selling for a lower price than local produced. If you are going to protect one industry, don't let another lose out. Make the Canadians take an equal quantity of Texas grown watermelons.
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