Can a connection be wrapped to stop a freon leak ??

I'm sure this is a dumb question, but humor me anyway ...thanks !!!
The air conditioning system has a leak where it connects to the metering valve. (flare nut connection)....because the a/c is
a closed system, the cost of repairing this connection range from 450. to 800.00. The serviceman knows it's leaking due to the film of oil around the connection.. He attempted to tighten it up but says it needs replacement.
Is there something that could be wrapped around the entire connection (like you would use electrical tape around a spliced joint) to keep it from leaking??? There is still a sizeable amount of freon in the system (we had it overcharged to carry us over the recent hot spell).
Boy...like everything else, the cost of having something repaired is so astronomical, it's cheaper in the long run to replace it.
Thanks for your help...
Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Trying to wrap it with tape or anything or the sort is not worth any effort...the A/C system in a car is under enough pressure that it will simply leak around it, and that aside, the molecular size of alot of refrigerants used in the automotive industry today allows it to seep *through* some rubber hoses...so electrical tape or anything of the sort will be of no use.
I'm curious why the quote to replace what could quite possibly be just a simple O-Ring is so high, however... Yes, you'll need to have the system evacuated, repaired, do a leak check and pull a vacuum, and ultimately recharge it...but it shouldn't cost $800.
Now, if there's more then just an O-Ring problem (Actual cracked line or a major repair outside of that) then it could easilly stretch into that dollar figure...but I'd clarify exactly what your repair guy plans on doing for that amount of money before you go any further...and if you do go ahead, ask for your old parts back and verify there are new ones in it's place.
--
Mark
http://www.oshawapilot.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dittos Mark. The system is under enough pressure that there would be no tape that would be able to hold it in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Peter wrote:

You could try putting some of the aftermarket leak stop in the system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What type refrigerant, R12 or R134?
Overcharging the system doesn't accomplish what you think it does, if fact, it makes any slight leak worse because of higher pressures. If the 'serviceman' did this, run away/run away!
Eventually all AC systems leak. You didn't post the year of your vehicle, but if it's more than 3yrs old it's leaking somewhere. Slight leaks around connections are usually bad seals/o-rings. Easy/not expensive to fix. Do Not use any 'sealer' in the AC system! Any honest AC man will tell you that using a sealer will cost you more in the long-run than just fixing the leak. Sealer is just about impossible to remove from the AC system.
You should have posted the make/model/year of your vehicle....a big help to those trying to help you.
Dave S(Texas)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oops, sorry... it's a 1994 Buick Regal 3800 with only about 45K miles on the odometer. The alternator and intake manifold plenum have already been replaced, so I don't know if this is typical of 12 y/o car with low useage or not.
I think the service person was trying to be helpful in slightly overcharging the system. He was trying to give me some additional time to see if the repairs would be worthwhile.... he couldn't guarantee that something else wouldn't fail (i.e. compressor) after the repairs had been made.
Well, wrapping the connection won't work... Thanks for providing that information..... I guess the best thing is to see how long it will take for the freon to leak out and then bring it in for repairs.
What is involved with evacuating and recharging the system..... this seems to be the bulk of the work...how much time would something like that take ??.
Thank you for your help and assistance !!!
Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pulling a vacuum on the system and recharging would take anywhere from 30min to 1hr....depending. If the compressor is 12yrs+old, you are on borrowed time...that is about twice the lifespan of compressors.
Everything depends on how reliable you want the system to be and for how long. If you just want to get the leak(s) fixed and the system then holds a vacuum, you might be good for a short time. Eventually, that compressor is going to throw up and you will have to have a new or rebuilt compressor/new accumulator/orfice tube and then evacuate/recharge again.
Dave S(Texas)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The shop is most likely going to convert you to 134a refrigerant. R-12 is very expensive so it may be cheaper to have the conversion kit installed.
FWIW, my '91 Regal lasted about 11 or 12 years (but 130k miles) and the compressor went. Then the rebuilt went under warranty, then it went again after the warranty so it has not been fixed. Not worth it at this point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it
system
No replace it, or dont have air. It will never hold freon...
--
1984 RZ350

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.