Using Dielectric Grease

Simple question....
#1 exactly what is dielectric grease....
#2 where can it be used
#3 when applying to a spark plug boot for the     purpose of making future removal easier
    do I also apply it to the plug?? Where ??     On the ceramic insulator and the plug wire     connection...or just the insulator.
Thanks in advance !!
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1. A non-conductive grease used to help lubricate electrical sockets and things similar, and keep water out.
2. Pretty much anywhere, but is usually used to help keep water out of electrical socket connections and plug wire boots, and keep the connections lubricated to facilitate easier installation and removal.
3. I personally just put a small bead around the inside of the spark plug boot and it's worked great for me.
Peter wrote:

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I use the stuff on every electrical connector under the hood and outside the car. Works great. I was getting some trouble codes that weren't making any sense. I took the computer out, took it apart, clean it out, put it back together and put dielectric grease on all the connectors. All the trouble codes magically went away.
Steve
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Be careful with that stuff ! Using too much on the spark plug boot can result in a poor electrical contact. A small amount either applied on spark plug ribs [ below conductor ] or take a Q tip, and wipe thin coating around open end of boot, avoid going too deep.
If you want your car to last, clean wiring harnesses with mild soap and water, when dry rub some dilectric grease on outer portions of snap connector, this will seal dirt / water out, prolonging life of wiring. Glad I did it 15 years ago to my El Camino, as contacts are all good, and connectors snap apart easily.
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Thanks for all the responses..... I'm going to start using more of the grease on connectors, etc. Another very useful addition for my toolbox !!!
Thanks again !!
On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 12:19:57 -0400, Peter wrote:

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Di-electric grease is not what is used under ignition modules, as far as I know. I believe that stuff is called "heat sink compound" or something like that. Dielectric is made specifically FOR electric contacts (so do not worry about getting it too far in the boot). It is supposed to keep them moisture free and keep them conducting like they're supposed to.
I seem to recall reading that it has pieces of silver in it to help keep the contacts conducting well. (But it seems that would set the system up for current leak)
I use the stuff on pretty much any electric contact. (Never put it on brushes or anything like that... wonder what that'd do?)
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Dielectric grease is used under ignition modules and is also known as heatsink compound. It's usually silicone oil (inert, even at high temperatures) mixed with zinc oxide powder to keep it from dripping and to improve heat conduction. On the other hand, not all heatsink compounds are dielectric, at least no enough to be used safely with high voltage devices (do not rely upon simple ohm meter measurements because even metal powder in grease will usually measure as an open circuit).
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Dielectric grease is used under ignition modules and is also known as heatsink compound. It's usually silicone oil (inert, even at high temperatures) mixed with zinc oxide powder to keep it from dripping and to improve heat conduction. On the other hand, not all heatsink compounds are dielectric, at least no enough to be used safely with high voltage devices (do not rely upon simple ohm meter measurements because even metal powder in grease will usually measure as an open circuit).
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You are probably correct. But the heat sink compound I've been provided for use behind ignition modules is a thick paste. The dielectric grease I use on contacts is like a thin petroleum jelly.
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