W-Body Strut Cartridge Tool

Remember a little while ago I was asking how to make a strut cartridge removal tool for GM W-Body vehicles. Well, I made one. Piece of 1-1/2" x
1-1/2" x 0.100" HSS steel tubing, 10" long. a 32mm 1/2" drive shallow socket, 1/4" round bar. Weld a 2" piece of 1/4" round bar centred on each flat side of the tubing sticking out the end 1/8". Weld the 32mm socket (or whatever size) to the other end of the tubing so you can use a socket wrench on it. Voila, you have a W-Body strut cartidge removal tool, works pretty slick too, changed the struts on Saturday. I'll put pics up on the 'net later if anyone is interested.
Steve
PS - Timing belt will be done this week some time.
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I'd like to see that. You wrote HSS, which stands for High Speed Steel I assume you meant SS for Stainless Steel.

(or
wrench
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I wrote "HSS steel tubing." Sort of redundant since HSS is in itself means tubing. The exact material I used was "1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 0.100" A500 Grade B HSS." HSS in this case actually stands for "Hollow Structural Section."
Steve

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......and I'll put pics on the 'net tonight....

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Here's the pics:
http://www.apicalconveyorsystems.com/steve/struttool001.jpg
http://www.apicalconveyorsystems.com/steve/struttool002.jpg
Steve

x
socket
'net
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Nice job Steve, Snap On makes a tool similar with another interchangeable head for the different spacing found on some GM strut retainers. 75.00

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Didn't know there was different sizes. It should be easy to make one for any spacing. When you buy replacement struts they come with new retainers, so for anyone wanting to make there one for their vehicle, substitute the 1-1/2" square tube for whatever size works.
Although $75 isn't a bad deal, worth the money. I spent $3.99CDN for the socket, the rest of the material was just "laying" around the shop (on the steel rack, in 24' lengths). People who don't have access to the steel may end up spending a little more, and if they don't have aceess to a welder it could be a lot more.
Steve

shallow
on
socket
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cartridge
1-1/2"
shallow
centred on

socket
works
the
Great report and pix, thanx. Could you assist with this though;
1. Is a '96 Buick Regal a W body?
2. Can you relate what the difference is between the Lisle 6270 and the Branick GMW594 GM10 Strut Tools depicted on this page: http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/TTW405.html
3. Are either or both suitable for the replacement of the strut cartridges on the above listed vehicle and if so, is there a compatibility issue with the use of either OEM or aftermarket replacement strut cartridges with either of these tools?
4. These are for the front struts I think. Are there any special tools needed or available for replacing the rear struts?
Thanx in advance for your reply.
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Yes.
Different manufacturers? If it's description is "GM10 W car strut removal tool", it should work.

The nut should be the same regardless of strut manufacturer.

Just a strut spring compressor.
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removal
Great, thanx for your reply and assistance.
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