90 Accord main relay

My thanks to this news group and several websites that decribe the main relay problem. I had an intermittent problem with flashing sports light and check engine light for 5 years. It was getting bad
enough that I was going to donate the car. Dealer wanted to put in a new transmission. A mechanic said he replaced the main rely. I finally took out the main relay myself and found bad solder joints exactly as pictured on several web sites. Bought a new one for $40 (too timid to try fixing solder myself). Problem is solved.
Thanks again.
G
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Did he charge you for it?

Until the new relay gets the same problem. I believe that people who have resoldered their original relay have had no failures since,but a new relay may develop the same fractures.
(makes me wonder if the relay maker used the right solder alloy for the job???)
Now if you still have the old relay,you could find a friend who knows how to solder and has the tools to re-do the old relay and keep it as a spare.
--
Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

i think that's just a matter of time. i doubt anyone that's re-soldered has had that relay in operation for an additional 10+ years.

no, parts are subject to physical stress. a big no-no for solder joints. bad design - depending on manufacturer objective!

indeed - need a higher wattage iron for that relay - some big copper parts in there that will suck the heat out of a lesser iron and make crappy joints.
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IIRC,some people here have had MR failures 6-7 yrs after purchase.
The MR on my 94 Integra GSR lasted longer than before it was re-soldered. (and failed about at 7 yrs)
Too bad that car got stolen,stripped and torched last month. :-(
Now I have a 2003 Sentra SE-R Spec V.

I've been reading over on sci.electronics.design about the many different solder alloys manufacturers use on wave-soldering lines;some will fracture more easily than others,some may crystalize sooner.(and then fracture) The new lead-free solders are even worse;lots of NEW consumer products with fractured solder joints. Some solder alloys are not as ductile as others.

Yeah,I used a 60 W iron on mine.
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

sad news indeed.

how does that compare?

true enough. eutectic tin/lead for me.

perfect!
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It's got plenty of power(rated 175 HP -before mods),tho I miss the hatchback and fold down rear seats of the Integra.One of the [previous owners installed headers,cold air intake,short throw shifter,cat-back exhaust(a tad noisy for me)and slightly lower springs/shocks.So,it handles well,but rides a bit stiff.It has 17" rims and 215/45 WR17 tires.6 speed manny tranny,and limited-slip diff. I really haven't wrung it out yet. It's hard to keep it to the speed limit!
I would have gotten another Integra GS-R *IF* I had a garage to keep it safe.... you can install all sorts of alarms and protections,but they still will break in and tear the car up trying to take it,and then steal important pieces like the ECU,seats,etc.
Apt.complexes are just mini-shopping malls for Midnite Auto thieves. At least the Spec V has RFID chipped keys.
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

This article may be of interest.

http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-3513_7-6516433.html?tag=txt&tag=nl.e501
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Eric wrote:

post that to seth on the "Honda Pilot EXL 2007 - remote start" thread from july 14.
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Why post it to me? You do know that the exploit being discussed above has nothing to do with a remote starter as they don't use an RFID challenge/response signaling system, don't you?
To clone a remote starter remote control signal you would have to be scanning/reading the code while the button is repeatedly pressed a number of times till the scanner could figure out the algorithm used for the code hopping. They don't transmit when the receive a challenge signal.
If you want to be paranoid about the article mentioned above, then the way to protect oneself is to have their stock Honda (or any other brand) key stored in a lead lined key case when walking around with it in their pocket. The car alarm, remote starter, keyless entry unit, to be cloned would require first getting your hands on the actual FOB, in which case you don't need to clone it as you have the original.
All that aside, I'm guessing the "post that to seth on the "Honda Pilot EXL 2007 - remote start" thread from july 14." was more an attempt at being obnoxious than anything else. I know I never said the system was invulnerable, just not a high-risk threat. Having one's head or house destroyed by a piece of falling debris is also possible, but again, not likely and therefore I'm not losing any sleep worrying about it. Coincidently, neither my home owners insurance, car insurance or life insurance has any clause excluding space debris or remote starters. If they thought it was a high risk possibility you better believe they would have a clause and an additional cost rider as a result to make more money off the customer.
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Seth wrote:

seth, with respect, you're welcome to justify the remote starters you sell any way you want. but in terms of how the key [and replication system] works, you don't understand and are therefore propagating misinformation. that's not to say you haven't read the marketing blurb and can repeat it, but in terms of mechanism, you're still unclear.
it's a challenge/response mechanism - just like you have with computer network authentication. on startup, ecu signals for code with token, key hashes with it's own unique code that the ecu has been programmed to recognize, then transmits it back. if the token has been hashed correctly, the ecu will arm the ignition system. all an outsider has to do to break in is, well, follow the procedure spelled out in the article. the remote starter performs challenge/response just like the key.
are you welcome to have on in your own vehicle? sure. but please don't say they're impossible to hack because they're not. just like the key is not. the remote starter makes vehicle theft easier because there's a "key" permanently attached to the vehicle. as i said at the start, some people do this stuff for the technical challenge. hence the article. which i didn't write.
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Haven't sold them in years.

The key (Honda key from factory) is challenge/response. I didn't say otherwise. The FOB that controls the remote starter is not. It is purely 1-way, rolling code (also called code hopping).

Actually not the same. It (the remote starter RFID over-ride module) is wired direct into the lines that the RFID receiver uses to feed the vehicle ECU.

You need to work on your reading comprehension. Please show me where I said they were impossible to hack. I said it is a small risk due to the complexity of doing it vs. otehr easier methods of stealing ones car. Big difference. Re-read what I wrote and you will see that.
just like the key

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Seth wrote:

so is the honda key - never sends the same code twice. the point is, you can /predict/ what the next code will be if you have a few samples from which to establish the pattern.

it /is/ the same - the ecu still has to challenge and then compare the hash on the response.

apart from problems with engine wear caused by habitual use of remote starters, i mentioned security, a point on which you've taken great offense for reasons i still don't understand. and you continued arguing against that point regardless of the facts, finally resorting to what amounts to "well, if it /does/ get stolen, it's not excluded from your insurance, so hopefully you're ok".
fact: if you have the gear and the knowledge, and a laptop is not exactly an uncommon item, electronic theft is a good deal easier than mechanical. and remote starters mean the driver doesn't need to be present or challenged.
end of story.

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Gene Wagenbreth wrote:

i second that. personally, i prefer to replace, but soldering /definitely/ revives a sick honda most admirably.
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| found bad solder | joints exactly as pictured on several web sites. My '90 accord 's main relay ( made by Mitsuba ) has always been fine, now 85k+ km.
| Bought a new one for $40 Sold in msia @ M$85 ~= US$24.28
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